1923 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1923 throughout the world.  

Champions[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

Statistical leaders[edit]

American League National League
AVG Harry Heilmann DET .403 Rogers Hornsby STL .384
HR Babe Ruth NYY 41 Cy Williams PHI 41
RBI Babe Ruth NYY 141 Irish Meusel NYG 125
Wins George Uhle CLE 26 Dolf Luque CIN 27
ERA Stan Coveleski CLE 2.76     Dolf Luque CIN 1.93
Ks Walter Johnson WSH 130 Dazzy Vance BRO 197

Major league baseball final standings[edit]

American League final standings[edit]

American League W L Pct. GB Home Road
New York Yankees 98 54 0.645 46–30 52–24
Detroit Tigers 83 71 0.539 16 45–32 38–39
Cleveland Indians 82 71 0.536 16½ 42–36 40–35
Washington Senators 75 78 0.490 23½ 43–34 32–44
St. Louis Browns 74 78 0.487 24 40–36 34–42
Philadelphia Athletics 69 83 0.454 29 34–41 35–42
Chicago White Sox 69 85 0.448 30 30–45 39–40
Boston Red Sox 61 91 0.401 37 37–40 24–51


National League final standings[edit]

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
New York Giants 95 58 0.621 47–30 48–28
Cincinnati Reds 91 63 0.591 46–32 45–31
Pittsburgh Pirates 87 67 0.565 47–30 40–37
Chicago Cubs 83 71 0.539 12½ 46–31 37–40
St. Louis Cardinals 79 74 0.516 16 42–35 37–39
Brooklyn Robins 76 78 0.494 19½ 37–40 39–38
Boston Braves 54 100 0.351 41½ 22–55 32–45
Philadelphia Phillies 50 104 0.325 45½ 20–55 30–49


Negro League Baseball final standings[edit]

Negro National League final standings[edit]

Negro National League (West)
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Kansas City Monarchs 57 33 .633
Detroit Stars 40 27 .597
Chicago American Giants 41 29 .586
Indianapolis ABCs 45 34 .570
Cuban Stars 27 31 .466
St. Louis Stars 29 33 .468
Toledo Tigers / Cleveland Tate Stars 21 30 .423
Milwaukee Bears 14 32 .304

Memphis Red Sox

17 8 .680

†Memphis was not in the league but their games counted in the standings.

Eastern Colored League final standings[edit]

Eastern Colored League (East)
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Hilldale 32 17 .673
Cuban Stars 23 17 .575 4.5
Brooklyn Royal Giants 18 18 .500 7.5
Atlantic City Bacharach Giants 19 23 .452 9.5
New York Lincoln Giants 16 22 .421 10.5
Baltimore Black Sox 19 30 .388 13

Events[edit]

January–April[edit]

May–August[edit]

  • May 19 – For the first time in major league history, brothers on opposite teams hit home runs in the same game. Boston Red Sox catcher Rick Ferrell homers off his brother Wes Ferrell in the second inning, but the Cleveland Indians pitcher returns the favor as he homers in the third on a pitch called by his sibling. It is the only time that the Ferrell brothers homer in the same game.

September[edit]

  • September 7 – Boston Red Sox pitcher Howard Ehmke tosses a no-hitter in a 4–0 win over the Philadelphia Athletics, marking the second time in four days Philadelphia is no-hit.
  • September 17 – The New York Giants' George Kelly sets a major-league record by hitting home runs in three consecutive innings (3rd, 4th and 5th) against the Chicago Cubs' Vic Aldridge as New York rolls to a 13–6 win. Kelly adds a single and double to run his total bases to 15 for the game. Kelly has now hit a record six homers off cousin Aldridge this year, a mark off one pitcher that will be tied by Ted Williams in the 1941 season, off Johnny Rigney, and Ted Kluszewski in 1954, off Max Surkont.
  • September 24 – Hall of Famer Bill Terry makes his major league debut in the New York Giants' 6–3 loss to the Cincinnati Reds.
  • September 28 – The New York Yankees defeat the Boston Red Sox by twenty runs at Fenway Park, 24-4.
  • September 29 – Hall of Famer Hack Wilson makes his major league debut in the New York Giants' 5–1 loss to the Brooklyn Dodgers.

October[edit]

  • October 11 – The New York Yankees win their first World Series game against the New York Giants in nine tries on two home runs by Babe Ruth. Going back to the 1921 World Series, they were 0-8-1, with a tie game in the 1922 World Series.
  • October 12 – A solo home run by Casey Stengel in the seventh inning is the only run of the third game of the World Series.
  • October 13 – The Yankees get off to an 8–0 lead in game four of the World Series, and win it, 8–3.
  • October 14 – Joe Dugan hits the second inside the park home run of the World Series, as the Yankees defeat the Giants, 8-1.
  • October 15 – The New York Yankees defeat the New York Giants, 4-2, in Game 6 of the World Series to win their first World Championship, four games to two. The Yankees opened their new Yankee Stadium in April making it the third time that a team had inaugurated a new stadium with a World Series win. The three consecutive matchups between the Yankees and Giants (1921–1923) marked the only time, to date, that three straight World Series featured the same two clubs.

November–December[edit]

  • December 16 – The Eastern Colored League is formed with Ed Bolden serving as chairman.

Births[edit]

January–February[edit]

March–April[edit]

May–June[edit]

July–August[edit]

September–October[edit]

November–December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January–February[edit]

  • January   1 – Willie Keeler, 50, Hall of Fame right fielder and prolific bunter who compiled a .341 lifetime batting average, two National League batting champion titles, batted over .370 from 1894–99, including a .424 mark and record 44-game hitting streak for 1897 Orioles, while leading the league in singles seven times, hits three times and runs once, ranking second all-time in hits and runs upon retirement.
  • January 22 – Fred Cooke, 49, outfielder for the 1897 Cleveland Spiders of the National League.
  • January 25 – Nick Wise, 56, catcher/outfielder for the 1888 Boston Beaneaters of the National League.
  • January 28 – John Meister, 59, infield/outfield utility for the New York Metropolitans of the American Association during the 1886–1887 seasons.
  • February   4 – George Tebeau, 61, outfielder nicknamed ″White Wings″ for his blazing speed, who hit .269 and stole 228 bases in 627 games for four teams, and later became the owner of the Kansas City Blues American Association franchise.
  • February 17 – George Meakim, 57, pitcher who played between 1890 and 1895 with the Louisville Colonels, Chicago Colts, Philadelphia Athletics and Cincinnati Reds.
  • February 28 – Jim Britt, 67, pitcher who played from 1872 to 1873 for the Brooklyn Atlantics of the National Association.

March–April[edit]

  • March   3 – Harry Clarke, 62, right fielder for the 1889 Washington Nationals of the National League.
  • March   3 – Ducky Hemp, 60, outfielder for the Louisville Colonels, Pittsburgh Alleghenys and Stars between 1887 and 1890.
  • March 15 – Pete Wood, 56, Canadian-born pitcher for the Buffalo Bisons in 1885 and the Philadelphia Quakers in 1889.
  • March 15 – Goat Anderson, 43, outfielder for the 1907 Pittsburgh Pirates.
  • March 17 – Mortimer Hogan, 61, outfielder for the Milwaukee Brewers, New York Metropolitans and Cleveland Blues between 1884 and 1888.
  • April 10 – Jay Faatz, 62, first baseman for three teams, who also played and managed for the 1890 Buffalo Bisons of the Players' League in the 1890 season.
  • April 10 – Jim Gill, 57, second baseman/centerfielder for the 1889 St. Louis Browns of the American Association.
  • April 13 – Gene Krapp, 35, pitcher who played with the Cleveland Naps of the American League (1911–1912) and the Buffalo Buffeds/Blues of the Federal League (1914–1915).
  • April 20 – Jack Lynch, 66, pitcher who posted a 110–105 record and a 3.69 ERA in 221 games for three teams, and a member of the New York Metropolitans team who won the American Association pennant in 1884.
  • April 21 – Joe Ellick, 69, right fielder for four different teams and a player/manager for the Chicago Browns/Pittsburgh Stogies of the Union Association in 1884.
  • April 27 – Paul Sentell, 43, infielder who played from 1906 to 1907 for the Philadelphia Phillies.

May–June[edit]

  • May   1 – Henry Adkinson, 48, outfielder who played briefly for the 1895 St. Louis Browns of the National League.
  • May 23 – Willard Mains, 54, pitcher who posted a 16–17 record and a 3.53 ERA in parts of four seasons for the Chicago White Stockings, Cincinnati Kelly's Killers, Milwaukee Brewers and Boston Beaneaters.
  • June   3 – Harry Billiard, 39, pitcher who played with the New York Highlanders (1908), Indianapolis Hoosiers (1914) and Newark Pepper (1915).
  • June 10 – Bill Annis, 66, outfielder for the 1884 Boston Beaneaters of the National League.
  • June 11 – George Hall, 74, British-born outfielder who played from 1866 through 1877 for nine different teams, while hitting a .322 average in 365 career games and leading the National League in home runs in 1876.
  • June 12 – Cliff Carroll, 63, outfielder who hit a .251 average in 991 games for six different teams between 1882 and 1893.
  • June 19 – Tom Jones, 46, first baseman who hit .251 with 964 hits and 135 stolen bases for three American League teams between 1902 and 1910.
  • June 21 – Claude Elliott, 46, pitcher who played from 1904 to 1905 for the Cincinnati Reds and New York Giants.
  • June 21 – Bill Grevell, 25, pitcher for the 1919 Philadelphia Athletics of the American League.

July–August[edit]

  • July 10 – Joe Stabell, [?], outfielder for the 1885 Buffalo Bisons of the National League.
  • July 19 – Nate Kellogg, 64, shortstop who played briefly for the 1885 Detroit Wolverines of the National League.
  • August 15 – Marty Hogan, 53, British-born outfielder who played from 1894 through 1895 for the Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Browns of the National League.
  • August 16 – Bill Day, 56, pitcher for the Philadelphia Quakers/Phillies and the Pittsburgh Alleghenys of the National League from 1889 to 1890.
  • August 16 – Jim Scoggins, 32, pitcher for the 1913 Chicago White Sox of the American League.
  • August 22 – Jay Budd, 57, left fielder who played one game in 1890 for the Cleveland Infants of the short-lived Players' League.
  • August 29 – Jocko Milligan, 62, catcher/first baseman who played from 1884 to 1893 for six National League teams, most prominently with the Philadelphia Athletics.

September–October[edit]

  • September   1 – Frank McManus, 48, catcher who played between 1899 and 1904 with the Washington Senators and Brooklyn Superbas of the National League and the Detroit Tigers and New York Highlanders of the American League.
  • September   3 – Jack Barnett, 43, backup outfielder for the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1907 season.
  • September   5 – Dots Miller, 36, infielder who spent twelve seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies, and a member of the Pittsburgh team that won the National League pennant and defeated the Detroit Tigers in the 1909 World Series.
  • September   9 – George Keerl, 76, second baseman for the 1875 Chicago White Stockings of the National League.
  • September 18 – General Stafford, 55, versatile fielder who played over 100 games at three different positions for five teams, and a member of the 1898 National League Champion Boston Beaneaters.
  • October 21 – Biff Sheehan, 55, outfielder/first baseman for the St. Louis Browns of the National League during the 1895 and 1896 seasons.
  • October 22 – Warren McLaughlin, 47, pitcher who played for the Philadelphia Phillies and Pittsburgh Pirates between 1900 and 1903.
  • October 29 – Jack Nabors, 35, pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics of the American League from 1915 to 1917, who lost 19 consecutive decisions in 1916 to set a major league record that has never been matched.
  • October 29 – Jimmy Ryan, 60, center fielder for five teams between 1895 and 1903; a .306 career hitter who led the National League in hits, home runs, doubles and slugging in 1888; recovered from a serious injury in 1893 train wreck to hit .361 the next year, and finished third all-time in hits, fourth in runs and home runs upon retirement.

November–December[edit]

  • November   5 – Buck Becannon, 64, pitcher who played from 1884 to 1885 for the New York Metropolitans of the American Association and with the 1887 New York Giants of the National League.
  • November 12 – Mark Polhemus, 63, outfielder who played in 1887 with the Indianapolis Hoosiers of the Union Association.
  • November 16 – Fred House, 33, pitcher who posted a 1–2 record and a 5.20 ERA for the Detroit Tigers in 1913.
  • November 19 – Frank Pears, 57, pitcher for the 1889 Kansas City Cowboys of the American Association and the 1893 St. Louis Browns of the National League.
  • December   9 – Wild Bill Donovan, 47, pitcher who had 25-win seasons with 1901 Brooklyn and 1907 Detroit teams; later managed Highlanders and Phillies

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Strange and Unusual Plays". www.retrosheet.org. Retrieved June 13, 2012.