1927 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1927 throughout the world.

Headline Event of the Year[edit]

Champions[edit]

Awards[edit]

Statistical leaders[edit]

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Harry Heilmann DET .398 Paul Waner PIT .380
HR Babe Ruth NYY 60 Hack Wilson CHC
Cy Williams PHI
30
RBI Lou Gehrig NYY 175 Paul Waner PIT 131
Wins Waite Hoyt NYY 22 Charlie Root CHC 26
ERA Wilcy Moore NYY 2.28 Ray Kremer PIT 2.47
Ks Lefty Grove PHA 174 Dazzy Vance BRO 184

Major league baseball final standings[edit]

American League final standings[edit]

American League W L Pct. GB Home Road
New York Yankees 110 44 0.714 57–19 53–25
Philadelphia Athletics 91 63 0.591 19 50–27 41–36
Washington Senators 85 69 0.552 25 51–28 34–41
Detroit Tigers 82 71 0.536 27½ 44–32 38–39
Chicago White Sox 70 83 0.458 39½ 38–37 32–46
Cleveland Indians 66 87 0.431 43½ 35–42 31–45
St. Louis Browns 59 94 0.386 50½ 38–38 21–56
Boston Red Sox 51 103 0.331 59 29–49 22–54


National League final standings[edit]

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Pittsburgh Pirates 94 60 0.610 48–31 46–29
St. Louis Cardinals 92 61 0.601 55–25 37–36
New York Giants 92 62 0.597 2 49–25 43–37
Chicago Cubs 85 68 0.556 50–28 35–40
Cincinnati Reds 75 78 0.490 18½ 45–35 30–43
Brooklyn Robins 65 88 0.425 28½ 34–39 31–49
Boston Braves 60 94 0.390 34 32–41 28–53
Philadelphia Phillies 51 103 0.331 43 34–43 17–60


Negro League Baseball final standings[edit]

Negro National League final standings[edit]

Negro National League (West)
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Chicago American Giants 54 28 .659
Kansas City Monarchs 58 33 .637
St. Louis Stars 60 35 .632
Detroit Stars 70 53 .569
Birmingham Black Barons 53 41 .564
Cuban Stars 21 40 .344
Cleveland Hornets 17 42 .288
Memphis Red Sox 28 74 .275
  • Chicago won the first half, Birmingham won the second half.
  • Chicago beat Birmingham 4 games to 0 games in a play-off.

Eastern Colored League final standings[edit]

Eastern Colored League (East)
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Atlantic City Bacharach Giants/Bees 64 39 .621
Baltimore Black Sox 36 30 .545
Harrisburg Giants 45 31 .523
Newark Cuban Stars 28 28 .500
New York Lincoln Giants 21 22 .488
Hilldale 47 70 .402
Brooklyn Royal Giants 14 26 .350

Homestead Grays

7 0 1.000

†Homestead was not in the league, but these games counted in the standings. Atlantic City won both first and second halves.

Events[edit]

  • April 15 - Babe Ruth hits a bases-empty homer against Howard Ehmke of the Philadelphia Athletics in the first inning. It is Babe's first of the year. The Yankees win, 6–3.
  • May 3
    • Jesse & Virgil Barnes become the first big league brothers to pitch against each other. Virgil and the New York Giants defeat Jesse and the Brooklyn Robins, 7–6.
    • The Pittsburgh Pirates score a run in the eighth and two in the ninth to come from behind and defeat the St. Louis Cardinals 11-10, and move into a tie for first place in the National League.
  • May 10 - In Detroit, it's Ty Cobb day and more than 30,000 pay to see the Detroit Tigers legend in his first appearance at Navin Field in a Philadelphia Athletics uniform. With Eddie Collins on base in the first inning, Cobb drives a double into the overflow crowd to send home Collins for the first run of the game as the Athletics would eventually beat the Tigers 6–3.
  • May 11 - For the second day in a row, a baseball legend faces his former team for the first time in his career. Rogers Hornsby leads the New York Giants to a 10–1 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals at the Polo Grounds with a home run and five RBIs.
  • May 14 - Tris Speaker is held hitless by George Uhle in four at-bats in his first game against the Cleveland Indians.
  • May 22 - The Yankees are in high spirits in Cleveland as they beat the Indians, 7–2, with Babe Ruth hitting his 10th home run of the young season. Ruth's homer is described as a popup that goes over the fence. The Yankees, who wear Indian headdresses during the game, now lead the Al by four and a half games.
  • May 31 – For the first time in Major League history, an unassisted triple play is turned on consecutive days. This time the trick was turned by Detroit Tigers first baseman Johnny Neun, for the seventh time in history, in a 1–0 win over the Cleveland Indians.
    • Babe Ruth homers for the fourth consecutive game in the fifth inning of the nightcap in Shibe Park. Ruth, who hits his 15th against Jack Quinn and 16th off Howard Ehmke, finishes May with 12 round-trippers. They lose the opener, 10–3. The Athletics' Jimmie Foxx hits his first major league homer; it comes off Urban Shocker.
  • June 11 - In Cleveland, Babe Ruth hits his 19th and 20th home runs against left-hander Garland Buckeye. The Yankees win, 6–4.
  • June 12 - For the second day in a row, the Brooklyn Robins defeat the Pittsburgh Pirates by a score of 11–10.
  • June 16 - The Chicago Cubs complete a twelve-game winning streak to move within a game of first place in the National League.
  • July 5 - The Boston Red Sox defeat the Philadelphia Athletics, 6–5, to end a fifteen-game losing streak.
  • July 9 - Johnny Neun steals five bases in the Detroit Tigers' 14–4 victory over the New York Yankees.
  • July 13 - The Detroit Tigers' Johnny Neun steals home in both games of a doubleheader with the Washington Senators.
  • July 24 - Babe Ruth hits his 31st home run of the season and his first of 1927 at Comiskey Park; he now has homered in every AL park. The homer, off Tommy Thomas, breaks a 12-day drought for the Bambino. The Yanks win the game, 3–2.
  • August 16 - At Comiskey Park, Babe Ruth hits a home run against Tommy Thomas. It is Ruth's 37th of the season, but he trails Lou Gehrig, who has 38. The Yankees win the game, 8–1.
  • September 3
    • The New York Yankees are shut out for the only time all season by Lefty Grove and the Philadelphia Athletics.
    • Tied for first, the Pittsburgh Pirates sweep a two-game series from the St. Louis Cardinals. They maintain sole possession of first place for the remainder of the season.
  • September 4 - At Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Babe Ruth hits his 400th career home run and his 44th of the year. The landmark homer comes against Rube Walberg in a 12–2 Yankees win.
  • September 5 - The Boston Red Sox beat the New York Yankees 12–11 in eighteen innings.
  • September 6 - Babe Ruth and the Yankees come to Fenway Park for a doubleheader. In game 1, Ruth hits his 45th and 46th home runs of the year against Tony Welzer, and the Yankees win, 14–2. One of Ruth's round-trippers clears the center-field fence and is reputedly the longest ever hit at Fenway. In game 2, the Red Sox win, 5–2, despite Ruth's 47th home run, hit against Jack Russell.
  • September 7 - Babe Ruth follows up on his three-homer day at Fenway Park with two more. Against Danny MacFayden, Ruth hits his 48th and later cracks number 49 against Slim Harriss. The Yankees win, 12–10, and Ruth now has 8 home runs at Fenway Park.
  • September 11 - Back At Yankee Stadium, Babe Ruth continues his home run barrage. He hits number 50, this one against Milt Gaston of the Browns; the Yankees lose nonetheless, 6–2.
  • September 13 - A big day for the Yankees and Babe Ruth. In a doubleheader against the Indians, Ruth hits his 51st home run against Willis Hudlin and his 52nd off Joe Shaute. The Yankees win both games by the score of 5–3 and clinch the AL pennant in their 139th game of the season. In addition, Waite Hoyt wins his 20th game.
  • September 18 - At Yankee Stadium, New York sweeps Chicago in a doubleheader, 2–1 and 5–1. In the nightcap, against Ted Lyons, Babe Ruth hits his 54th home run of the year. Lou Gehrig weighs in with his third grand slam home run of 1927.
  • September 22 - At Yankee Stadium, Babe Ruth homers against the Tigers Ken Holloway for his 56th of the season. Earl Combs hits three consecutive triples, and the Yankees win, 8-7.
  • September 27 - Babe Ruth homers with the bases loaded against Lefty Grove of the Athletics. it is Ruth's 57th of the season. The Yankees win, 7-4.
  • September 29 - Babe Ruth of the New York Yankees hits two home runs to tie his own 1921 record of 59 home runs as the Yankees beat the Washington Senators, 15–4.
  • September 30 - With the score tied 2–2 in the eighth inning, and a runner on third, Babe Ruth hits his 60th home run of the season off Washington Senators pitcher Tom Zachary for a Yankees 4–2 victory. Ruth's 60-HR season-record would not be broken for 34 years.
  • October 2 - Harry Heilmann goes seven-for-nine with a walk in a double header on the final day of the season to miss a .400 batting average for the season by .002.
  • October 6 - Once again, sloppy play by the Pittsburgh Pirates helps the Yankees cruise to a game two victory as they score runs on an error, wild pitch and hit batsman.
  • October 7 - A three-run home run by Babe Ruth caps off a six-run seventh inning as the Yankees cruise to an 8–1 victory in game three of the World Series.
  • October 8 – The New York Yankees defeat the Pittsburgh Pirates, 4–3, in Game 4 of the World Series, to win their second World Championship, four games to none. This was the first sweep by an American League team over the National League. Babe Ruth's fifth-inning home run gives the Yankees a 3–1 lead, but Pittsburgh ties the game later. In the top of the ninth inning, Earle Combs walks, Mark Koenig beats out a bunt, and Ruth walks to fill the bases. Two outs later, a wild pitch rolls far enough away for Combs to score the winning run.
  • November 28 – Billy Evans quits as American League umpire to becomes business manager of the Cleveland Indians, following the purchase of the club by a group headed by Alva Bradley, to become the first General Manager in major league history. Evans, who worked as an AL umpire from 1906 to 1927, became, at age 22, the youngest umpire in major league history, and later became the youngest to officiate in the World Series at age 25.

Births[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January[edit]

  • January 13 - Bob Ingersoll, 44, pitcher for the 1914 Cincinnati Reds.
  • January 27 - Drummond Brown, 41, pitcher from 1912 to 1914 for the National League Boston Braves and the Kansas City Packers of the Federal League.

February[edit]

  • February 11 - Bobby Rothermel, 56, infielder who played with the 1899 Baltimore Orioles.
  • February 13 - Vive Lindaman, 49, pitcher for the Boston Doves/Beaneaters of the National League from 1906 to 1909.
  • February 17 - Harry Little, 76, outfielder/second baseman for the St. Louis Brown Stockings and Louisville Grays of the National League during the 1877 season.
  • February 19 - Katsy Keifer, 35, pitcher for the 1914 Indianapolis Hoosiers of the Federal League.
  • February 21 - Ike Rockenfield, 50, second baseman for the St. Louis Browns of the American League in the 1905 and 1906 seasons.
  • February 24 - Charlie Bennett, 72, star catcher whose career was ended when a train accident cost him his legs.

March[edit]

  • March   4 - Horace Wilson, 84, American professor of English at Tokyo University during the modernization of Japan after the Meiji Restoration, who is credited with introducing baseball to Japan in either 1872 or 1873.
  • March   6 - John Tilley, 72, left fielder for the Cleveland Blues, Toledo BlueStockings and St. Paul WhiteCaps in parts of two seasons spanning 1882-1884.
  • March 16 - Jake Wells, 63, catcher and left fielder for the 1888 Detroit Wolverines and the 1890 St. Louis Browns.
  • March 27 - Joe Start, 84, prominent first baseman of the 1860s and 1870s.

April[edit]

  • April   1 - Ben Harris, 37, pitcher for the Kansas City Packers of the Federal League from 1914 to 1915.
  • April   2 - Mike Lynch, 46, pitcher for the Pittsburgh PIrates and New York Giants from 1904 through 1907.
  • April   7 - Billy Alvord, 63, third baseman for five seasons from 1885 to 1893.
  • April   7 - Ray Miller, 39, pitcher for the Cleveland Indians and the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1917.
  • April 13 - Kirtley Baker, 57, National League pitcher for the Pittsburgh Alleghenys, Baltimore Orioles and Washington Senators in parts of five seasons spanning 1890-1899.
  • April 13 - Tommy Johns, 75, left fielder for the Baltimore Marylands of the National Association during the 1873 season.
  • April 18 - Pop Smith, 70, infielder for 12 seasons from 1880 to 1891.
  • April 26 - Bill Gannon, 54, outfielder for the Chicago Orphans of the National League in 1901.

May[edit]

  • May   3 - Otto Schomberg, 62, first baseman and right fielder for the 1886 Pittsburgh Alleghenys of the American Association and the 1887-88 Indianapolis Hoosiers of the National League.
  • May 16 - Pat Murphy, 70, backup catcher who played from 1887 through 1890 for the New York Giants of the National League.
  • May 18 - Patrick O'Loughlin, 67, Irish outfielder who appeared in one game for the 1883 Baltimore Orioles of the American Association.
  • May 26 - Herm Merritt, 26, shortstop for the 1921 Detroit Tigers of the American League.

June[edit]

  • June   7 - Pat Griffin, 34, pitcher for the 1914 Cincinnati Reds of the National League.
  • June 18 - Jack Harper, 33, pitcher for the 1915 Philadelphia Athletics of the American League.

August[edit]

  • August   6 - Chick Pedroes, 57, Cuban outfielder in two games for the 1902 Chicago Cubs of the National League.
  • August   8 - Billy Gilbert, 51, second baseman for four different teams from 1901 through 1909, and member of the 1905 New York Giants World Champion team.
  • August 16 - Jerry Denny, 68, third baseman for seven National League teams in 13 seasons spanning 1881-94.
  • August 22 - Mike Shea, 60, pitcher in two games for the 1887 Cincinnati Red Stockings of the American Association.
  • August 25 - Harry Cheek, 48, backup catcher for the 1910 Philadelphia Phillies of the National League.

September[edit]

  • September   6 - Lave Cross, 61, third baseman and catcher for over 20 seasons, captain of the 1902 and 1905 AL champion Philadelphia Athletics, and one of the first ten players to collect 2,500 hits.
  • September 27 - Ben Hunt, 38, pitched for the Red Sox and Cardinals in the early 1910s.
  • September 30 - Hank Morrison, 61, pitcher for the 1887 Indianapolis Hoosiers of the National League.

October[edit]

  • October   4 - John Richter, 54, third baseman for the 1898 Louisville Colonels of the National League.
  • October 11 - Mike Corcoran, 69, pitcher in one game for the 1884 Chicago White Stockings of the National League.
  • October 14 - Ed Hughes, 47, pitcher for the Boston Americans of the American League in the 1905 and 1906 seasons.
  • October 22 - Ross Youngs, 30, Hall of Fame right fielder who hit a career .322 batting average for the New York Giants over 10 seasons from 1917 to 1926, which included four National League pennants and two World Series championships in 1921 and 1922.
  • October 25 - Tom Brown, 67, outfielder who played from 1892 through 1898 for nine teams in four different leagues, collecting 1951 hits in 1788 games, while managing two seasons for the 1897–1898 Washington Senators, and umpiring three full seasons.

November[edit]

  • November   7 - Ed Clark, 64, pitcher for the 1886 Philadelphia Athletics of the American Association,
  • November   8 - Phil Bedgood, 29, pitcher from 1922 to 1923 for the Cleveland Indians of the American League.
  • November 22 - John McGlone, 66, third baseman for the 1886 Washington Senators of the National League and the 1887-88 Cleveland Blues of the American Association.
  • November 30 - Jimmy Wood, 84, player/manager for the Chicago White Stockings, Troy Haymakers, Brooklyn Eckfords and Philadelphia White Stockings from 1871 to 1873, who hit .333 in 102 games and posted a 105–99 managerial record.

December[edit]

  • December   1 - Danny Shay, 51, shortstop for the Cleveland Blues, St. Louis Cardinals and New York Giants in parts of four seasons spanning 1901-07.
  • December   1 - Germany Smith, 64, shortstop who played from 1884 through 1898 for seven different teams, most notably for the Brooklyn Grays/Bridegrooms during seven seasons.
  • December 17 - Bill Gilbert, 59, pitcher for the 1892 Baltimore Orioles of the National League.
  • December 24 - Al Myers, 64, second baseman who played from 1894 to 1891 for five teams, most prominently with the Washington Nationals of the National League.
  • December 31 - Jack Sharrott, 58, pitcher/outfielder who posted a 20–17 record with a 3.12 ERA and a .237 batting average for the New York Giants and Philadelphia Phillies from 1890 to 1893.