1930 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1930 Alabama Crimson Tide football
National Champions (various selectors)
Rose Bowl Champions
Southern Conference Co-Champions
Conference Southern Conference
1930 record 10–0 (8–0 SoCon)
Head coach Wallace Wade
Captain Charles B. Clement
Home stadium Denny Stadium
Legion Field
Cramton Bowl
Seasons
« 1929 1931 »
1930 Southern Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Alabama § 8 0 0     10 0 0
Tulane § 5 0 0     8 1 0
Tennessee 6 1 0     9 1 0
Duke 4 1 1     8 1 2
Vanderbilt 5 2 0     8 2 0
Maryland 4 2 0     7 5 0
Florida 4 2 1     6 3 1
North Carolina 4 2 2     5 3 2
Clemson 3 2 0     8 2 0
Georgia 3 2 1     7 2 1
Kentucky 4 3 0     5 3 0
South Carolina 4 3 0     6 4 0
Virginia Tech 2 3 1     5 3 1
Mississippi State 2 3 0     2 7 0
Georgia Tech 2 4 1     2 6 1
LSU 2 4 0     2 6 1
Virginia 2 5 0     4 6 0
Sewanee 1 4 0     3 6 1
NC State 1 5 0     2 8 0
Ole Miss 1 5 0     3 5 1
Auburn 1 6 0     3 7 0
Washington & Lee 0 4 1     3 6 1
VMI 0 5 0     3 6 0
§ – Conference co-champions

The 1930 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1930 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 37th overall and 9th season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Wallace Wade, in his eighth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, at Legion Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with a perfect record (10–0 overall, 8–0 in the SoCon), as Southern Conference champions and as national champions after they defeated Washington State in the Rose Bowl.[1]

In April 1930, coach Wade announced his resignation effective at the end of the 1930 season, and his last Alabama team might have been his best. For psychological effect, Wade routinely started games with his second team, and the backups never allowed a point.[2] The first team defense only allowed the opposition to score 13 points over the course of the season en route to a 9–0 record. Only the Vanderbilt game was close, as the Commodores scored a late touchdown that cut Alabama's lead to five in their 12–7 loss. Vanderbilt's touchdown and a touchdown scored by Tennessee accounted for 13 points and all of the scoring by Alabama's opponents in 1930.

Alabama received its third Rose Bowl invitation in six seasons, this time against the also undefeated Cougars of Washington State. In the game, Wade started his second team. Once again, the second team did not allow any points and neither did the first team in their 24–0 victory. The win clinched the second perfect season in school history after 1925, and the Crimson Tide claims the 1930 national championship along with the Notre Dame Fighting Irish.

Johnny Cain starred at fullback, linebacker, and punter in 1930, and he was named punter for the Alabama Crimson Tide All-Century Team and was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Other players from the 1930 Alabama team included Fred Sington, who went on to play baseball for the Washington Senators and Frank Howard, who later became famous as the long-time head coach at Clemson. Jennings B. Whitworth, who kicked a field goal in the Rose Bowl, was hired as Alabama's football coach a quarter-century later.

Wade resignation[edit]

After eight seasons as Alabama's head coach, on April 1, 1930, Wallace Wade announced he would resign his position at the conclusion of the 1930 season to take the same position with Duke.[3] At the time of his announcement, Wade did not give a reason for his departure other than that his contract was set to expire on September 1, 1931.[3] Although never publicly stated by Wade himself, friends and former players attributed his resignation due to criticism he received during the 1927, 1928 and 1929 seasons as well as his desire to return to a private university.[2] Wallace Wade completed his Alabama tenure with a 61–13–3 record (.812), four conference titles, three national championships and having coached several star players. Wade, who followed up his success at Alabama with a longer and almost as successful run at Duke, was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.[4]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent Site Result Attendance
September 27 Howard* Denny StadiumTuscaloosa, AL W 43–0   6,000
October 4 Ole Miss Denny Stadium • Tuscaloosa, AL (Rivalry) W 64–0    
October 11 Sewanee Legion FieldBirmingham, AL W 25–0    
October 18 Tennesseedagger Denny Stadium • Tuscaloosa, AL (Third Saturday in October) W 18–6   18,000
October 25 Vanderbilt Legion Field • Birmingham, AL W 12–7   20,000
November 1 at Kentucky McLean StadiumLexington, KY W 19–0   22,000
November 8 at Florida Florida FieldGainesville, FL W 20–0   18,000
November 15 LSU Cramton BowlMontgomery, AL (Rivalry) W 33–0    
November 27 Georgia Legion Field • Birmingham, AL W 13–0   28,000
January 1, 1931 vs. Washington State* Rose BowlPasadena, CA (Rose Bowl) W 24–0   60,000
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming.
  • Source: Rolltide.com: 1930 Alabama football schedule[5]

Game notes[edit]

Howard[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Howard 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 0 34 0 9 43
  • Date: September 27
  • Location: Denny Stadium
    Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Game attendance: 6,000

Alabama opened the 1930 season with their only scheduled non-conference game against Howard College (now Samford University) at Denny Stadium. Before an estimated crowd of 6,000 fans, Alabama shutout Howard 43–0.[6][7] After a scoreless first quarter, the Crimson Tide scored 34 second quarter points. Touchdowns were scored on runs by Johnny Cain, John Henry Suther (one on a 56-yard run and another on a 96 yard kickoff return), Hillman D. Holley and John Campbell.[7] The final points of the game came in the fourth on a Hugh Miller run and 33-yard drop kick to make the final score 43–0.[7] In the game, Alabama gained 513 total yards on 66 plays and held Howard to only 84 yards on 32 plays.[8] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Howard to 11–0.[9]

Ole Miss[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Ole Miss 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 6 13 13 32 64
  • Date: October 4
  • Location: Denny Stadium
    Tuscaloosa, AL

Alabama opened conference play game against the Ole Miss Rebels, and for a second consecutive week shutout their opponent. This time the Rebels were defeated Howard 64–0.[7][10] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Ole Miss to 14–2–1.[11]

Sewanee[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Sewanee 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 0 6 0 19 25
  • Date: October 11
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, AL

For the third week in a row, Alabama shutout their opponent, and this time it was the Sewanee Tigers at Legion Field 25–0.[12] The team was led by assistant coach Hank Crisp as both head coach Wade and assistant Jess Neely were in Knoxville to scout the Volunteers for their game the following week.[12] John Campbell gave Alabama their first points with his 58-yard touchdown run in the second quarter.[12] After Campbell scored his second touchdown, John Tucker scored two more to make the final score 25–0.[12] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Sewanee to 13–10–3.[13]

Tennessee[edit]

Third Saturday in October
1 2 3 4 Total
Tennessee 0 0 0 6 6
Alabama 0 12 6 0 18
  • Date: October 18
  • Location: Denny Stadium
    Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Game attendance: 18,000

On homecoming in Tuscaloosa, Alabama defeated the Tennessee Volunteers 18–6 before the largest crowd to see an Alabama game in Tuscaloosa.[14] The loss was Tennessee's first in 34 games dating back to a 20–3 loss to Vanderbilt during the 1926 season.[14] Alabama took a 6–0 lead after Johnny Cain scored on a 13-yard touchdown run.[15] John Henry Suther extended their lead to 12–0 later in the quarter on his 33-yard touchdown run.[15] After Hugh Miller scored on a short run in the third, Tennessee responded with their only points of the game on a short Buddy Hackman run in the fourth to make the final score 18–6.[15] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Tennessee to 9–4–1.[16]

Vanderbilt[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Vanderbilt 0 0 7 0 7
Alabama 0 6 6 0 12
  • Date: October 25
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 20,000

Against the favored Vanderbilt Commodores, Wallace Wade defeated his coaching mentor Dan McGugin 12–7 at Legion Field.[17] After a scoreless first quarter, Alabama scored the first touchdown of the game on a short John Campbell run.[17] The Crimson tide lead was extended to 12–0 in the third after a 13-yard John Henry Suther run. The Commodores then scored their only points of the game later in the third when Benny Parker threw a 26-yard touchdown pass to William Schwartz.[17] Late in the game, Vandy drove to the Alabama 27-yard line before they stalled out and never threatened again, and after a scoreless fourth quarter, Alabama won 12–7.[17] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Vanderbilt to 3–8.[18]

Kentucky[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 6 0 0 13 19
Kentucky 0 0 0 0 0
  • Date: November 1
  • Location: McLean Stadium
    Lexington, KY
  • Game attendance: 22,000

In what was the first road game of the season, Alabama traveled to Lexington and defeated the Wildcats 19–0.[19] Alabama scored their first points on a 49-yard Jimmy Moore touchdown pass to John Henry Suther for a 6–0 lead.[20] Still with only a 6–0 lead, Alabama scored 13 fourth quarter points to seal the victory. John Campbell and Leon Long each scored a touchdown on a short run to make the final score 19–0.[19] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Kentucky to 9–1.[21]

Florida[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 0 6 0 14 20
Florida 0 0 0 0 0
  • Date: November 8
  • Location: Florida Field
    Gainesville, FL
  • Game attendance: 18,000

In the first game ever played at Florida Field, Alabama defeated the Gators on their homecoming 20–0.[22] After a scoreless first quarter, Alabama scored their first points on a 21-yard John Campbell touchdown run for a 6–0 lead.[20] Still with only a 6–0 lead, Alabama scored 14 fourth quarter points to seal the victory. Campbell and John Tucker each scored a touchdown on short runs to make the final score 20–0.[22] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Florida to 4–3.[23]

LSU[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
LSU 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 14 13 6 0 33
  • Date: November 15
  • Location: Cramton Bowl
    Montgomery, AL

In the only game of the season played at the Cramton Bowl, Alabama defeated their rival LSU 33–0.[24] Alabama touchdowns were scored on an 80-yard John Campbell kickoff return and on runs by John Tucker, Hillman D. Holley, Leon Long and Bellini.[20] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against LSU to 11–3–2.[25]

Georgia[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Georgia 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 6 0 0 7 13
  • Date: November 27
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 28,000

In their final regular season game, Alabama defeated the Georgia Bulldogs 13–0 to capture the Southern Conference championship.[24] John Campbell scored Alabama's first touchdown in the first quarter on a short run and Johnny Cain in the fourth quarter on a one-yard run.[20] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Georgia to 11–11–3.[27]

Washington State[edit]

Rose Bowl
1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 0 21 3 0 24
Washington State 0 0 0 0 0
  • Date: January 1, 1931
  • Location: Rose Bowl
    Pasadena, CA
  • Game attendance: 60,000

Immediately after their victory over Georgia in the season finale, University president George Denny accepted an invitation to play in the 1931 Rose Bowl against the Washington State Cougars.[29] In the game, the Crimson Tide overwhelmed the Cougars with their 24–0 victory before 60,000 fans at Pasadena.[28] After a scoreless first, Alabama scored three second-quarter touchdowns in a six-minute blitz to take a 21–0 lead. The first score came on a 61-yard Jimmy Moore touchdown pass to John Henry Suther with the other two coming on touchdown runs of one and 43-yards by John Campbell.[28] Jennings B. Whitworth scored the final points of the game with his 30-yard field goal to give Alabama the 24–0 victory.[28]

National championship claim[edit]

The NCAA recognizes consensus national champions as the teams that have captured a championship by way of one of the major polls since the 1950 college football season. Prior to 1950, national championships were chosen by a variety of selectors, and in the 1980s, Alabama claimed the 1930 championship as one of its 15 claimed/recognized national championships.[1][30] As such, Alabama claims a share of the 1930 national championship, with Notre Dame, due to each school being selected national champion by various major selectors.[1] Specifically, Alabama was selected national champion in 1934 by Football Research, Parke Davis, Sagarin and Sagarin (ELO-Chess).[1]

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

General

  • "1930 Season Recap" (PDF). RollTide.com. University of Alabama Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 

Specific

  1. ^ a b c d National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). "National Poll Champions" (PDF). 2011 NCAA Division I Football Records. NCAA.org. p. 73. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Richard, Scott (2004). Legends of Alabama Football. Champaign, Illinois: Sports Publishing, LLC. p. 4. ISBN 9781582612775. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "Wade will leave 'Bama in 1931". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). April 1, 1930. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee search: Wallace Wade". National Football Foundation. Retrieved February 17, 2013. 
  5. ^ "1930 Alabama football schedule". RollTide.com. University of Alabama Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b "'Bama 43, Howard 0". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). September 28, 1930. p. 11. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b c d "Suther stars in Tide win". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). September 28, 1930. p. 11. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Alabama gains 513 yards with scrimmage play". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). September 28, 1930. p. 11. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  9. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Samford". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  10. ^ a b "Tide trounces Ole Miss 64–0". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). September 28, 1930. p. 12. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  11. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Mississippi". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  12. ^ a b c d e "Tide gains force in last quarter to defeat Tigers". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). October 12, 1930. p. 11. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  13. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Sewanee". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  14. ^ a b c "Tide drowns Vols, 18–6". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). October 19, 1930. p. 1. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  15. ^ a b c "How they scored". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). October 19, 1930. p. 11. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  16. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Tennessee". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  17. ^ a b c d e "Running attack beats air raid of Commodores". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). October 26, 1930. p. 9. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  18. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Vanderbilt". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  19. ^ a b c "Tide doused Wildcats 19 to 0". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). November 2, 1930. p. 9. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  20. ^ a b c d 1930 Season Recap
  21. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Kentucky". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  22. ^ a b c "Tide gets Gator hides, 20–0". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). November 9, 1930. p. 9. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  23. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Florida". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  24. ^ a b c "Tide 33 LSU 0". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). November 16, 1930. p. 9. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  25. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Louisiana State". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  26. ^ "Tide drowns Bulldogs 13 to 0 for Southern Conference title". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). November 28, 1930. p. 7. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  27. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Georgia". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  28. ^ a b c d Zimmerman, Paul (January 2, 1931). "Tide trounces Cougars in bowl classic, 24 to 0". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). Associated Press. p. 7. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  29. ^ "Tide takes coast bid". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). Associated Press. November 28, 1930. p. 1. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  30. ^ Solomon, Jon (January 6, 2010). "Got 12? Here's how Alabama bumped up its claim to a dozen national titles". The Birmingham News (AL.com). Retrieved April 8, 2012. 
  31. ^ "All-Time Tide Football Lettermen". 2011 Alabama Crimson Tide Football Record Book. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: University of Alabama Athletics Media Relations Office. 2011. pp. 127–141. 
  32. ^ "All-Time Assistant Coaches". 2011 Alabama Crimson Tide Football Record Book. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: University of Alabama Athletics Media Relations Office. 2011. pp. 142–143.