1933 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1933 throughout the world.

Headline Events of the Year[edit]

Champions[edit]

Major League Baseball[edit]

Other champions[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

MLB statistical leaders[edit]

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Jimmie Foxx PHA .356 Chuck Klein PHI .368
HR Jimmie Foxx PHA 48 Chuck Klein PHI 28
RBI Jimmie Foxx PHA 163 Chuck Klein PHI 120
Wins Alvin Crowder WSH
Lefty Grove PHA
24 Carl Hubbell NYG 23
ERA Mel Harder CLE 2.95 Carl Hubbell NYG 1.66
SO Lefty Gomez NYY 163 Dizzy Dean STL 199
SV Jack Russell WSH 13 Phil Collins PHI 6
SB Ben Chapman NYY 27 Pepper Martin STL 26

Major league baseball final standings[edit]

American League final standings[edit]

Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
1st Washington Senators 99   53 .651     --
2nd New York Yankees 91   59 .607   7.0
3rd Philadelphia Athletics 79   72 .523   19.5
4th Cleveland Indians 75   76 .497   23.5
5th Detroit Tigers 75   79 .487   25.0
6th Chicago White Sox 67   83 .447   31.0
7th Boston Red Sox 63   86 .423   34.5
8th St. Louis Browns 55   96 .364   43.5

National League final standings[edit]

Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
1st New York Giants 91   61 .599     --
2nd Pittsburgh Pirates 87   67 .565   5.0
3rd Chicago Cubs 86   68 .558   6.0
4th Boston Braves 83   71 .539   9.0
5th St. Louis Cardinals 82   71 .536   9.5
6th Brooklyn Dodgers 65   88 .425   26.5
7th Philadelphia Phillies 60   92 .395   31.0
8th Cincinnati Reds 58   94 .382   33.0

Negro League Baseball final standings[edit]

Negro National League final standings[edit]

Negro National League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Indianapolis American Giants 36 17 .679
Pittsburgh Crawfords 49 31 .613
Homestead Grays 14 9 .609
Detroit Stars 18 12 .600
Nashville Elite Giants 29 22 .569
Columbus/Akron/Cleveland Blue Birds 22 28 .444
Baltimore Black Sox 13 18 .419
  • Homestead was expelled for raiding players.
  • Several games were included in the standings against non-League teams.

Post-season:

  • Indianapolis and Pittsburgh won the first half.
    • Indianapolis beat Pittsburgh in a one-game play-off.
  • Nashville and Pittsburgh won the second half.
    • Pittsburgh beat Nashville in a 3-game play-off.
  • Indianapolis and Pittsburgh tied in a one-game play-off.
    • Pittsburgh owner/League commissioner awarded the Pennant to Pittsburgh, over the objection of Indianapolis.

Events[edit]

January - June[edit]

  • April 12 - The Cleveland Indians defeat the Detroit Tigers, 4-1, in thirteen innings on opening day.
  • May 16 - The Washington Senators beat the Cleveland Indians, 11-10, in twelve innings. Cleveland uses five pitchers; Washington uses six. The combined eleven pitchers used was at the time a record.
  • May 30 - John Stone of the Detroit Tigers becomes the first player in major league history to collect six extra base hits in a regulation length doubleheader‚ as he hit four doubles and two home runs against the St. Louis Browns.

July - September[edit]

  • July 19 - Rick & Wes Ferrell become the first brothers on opposing teams to hit home runs in the same game, as Wes' Indians defeat Rick's BoSox, 8-7, in thirteen innings.
  • July 22 - The Washington Senators and New York Yankees are tied for first with 55-32 records. Washington beats the Detroit Tigers 4-3, while the Yanks fall to the Cleveland Indians 2-1. Washington maintains sole possession of first place for the remainder of the season.
  • August 3 - For the first time since August 2, 1931, the New York Yankees are shut out by their opponent, losing 7-0 to the A's.[4]
  • August 4 - For the second game in a row, the New York Giants defeat the Philadelphia Phillies 18-1.
  • August 22 - The Detroit Tigers defeat the Washington Senators 10-8, snapping Washington's thirteen-game winning streak.
  • August 31 - Dutch Leonard makes his major league debut, pitching 7.1 innings and giving up three earned runs in the Brooklyn Dodgers' 10-3 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals.

October - December[edit]

  • October 1
    • At Yankee Stadium, Babe Ruth attracts 25‚000 fans as he takes the mound against the Boston Red Sox. Ruth hits a fifth-inning home run and takes a 6–0 lead into the sixth inning‚ then hangs on for a 6–5, complete-game victory. Boston pitcher Bob Kline takes the loss. The Yankees back the Babe with 18 outfield putouts. It is the final pitching appearance of his career. Ruth now has ten winning seasons in ten years as a pitcher‚ a mark that will be matched in 2004 by Andy Pettitte. Ruth's record on the mound for the Yankees is a perfect 5-0.
    • At 57 years old, former Washington Senators pitcher and current coach Nick Altrock takes a pinch hit at-bat in the Senators' eleven inning 3-0 loss to the Philadelphia A's.
  • October 4 - A six run sixth inning and superb pitching by Hal Schumacher carry the Giants to victory in game two of the World Series.
  • October 5 - Earl Whitehill shuts out the Giants in game three of the World Series, as Washington takes game three, 4-0.
  • October 6 - Blondy Ryan's eleventh-inning single gives the Giants the 2-1 victory in game four of the World Series.
  • October 7 - In Game 5 of the World Series, the Giants defeat the Senators 4-3 in ten innings, to win their fourth World Championship, four games to one. This would be the last World Series the Senators franchise would play in the nation's capital.
  • November 21 - Philadelphia Phillies right fielder Chuck Klein, who won the National League Triple Crown after hitting .368 with 28 home runs and 120 RBI, is sold to the Cubs for $125,000 and three players. Klein, who also led the NL in hits (223), doubles (44), extra bases (79), total bases (365), slugging (.602), on-base % (.422) and OPS (1.025), and finished second in runs (102) and fourth in stolen bases (15), is the only player in major league history to be traded after a Triple Crown season.
  • December 20 - The Washington Senators trade Goose Goslin to the Detroit Tigers for John Stone.

Movies[edit]

Births[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January[edit]

  • January   2 - Kid Gleason, 66, best known as the betrayed manager of the infamous 1919 Chicago White Sox; who previously collected four 20-wins seasons as a pitcher from 1890–1893, with a career-high 38 victories in 1890, and later became a timely hitter and steady second baseman, hitting a .300 average four times, while helping the Baltimore Orioles win a pennant in 1895; later serving as a coach, then winning the American League pennant as a rookie manager for the White Sox in 1919, when his heart was broken by his eight players implicated in the 1919 World Series scandal.
  • January   4 - Hal Deviney, 39, reflief pitcher for the Boston Red Sox during the 1920 season.
  • January 18 - Dan Marion, 43, pitcher who played with the Brooklyn Tip-Tops.43 in the 1914 and 1915 seasons.
  • January 19 - Con Starkel, 52, pitcher for the 1906 Washington Senators.
  • January 19 - Harry Hinchman, 54, pitcher for the Cleveland Naps in the 1907 season.
  • January 27 - Art Madison, 62, second baseman/shortstop who played for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1895 and the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1899.
  • January 31 - Beany Jacobson, 51, pitcher for the Washington Senators, St. Louis Browns and Boston Americans in the 1900s decade.

February[edit]

  • February 17 - Harry Smith, 59, British-born baseball player and manager, who catched from 1901 through 1909 for the Philadelphia Athletics, Pittsburgh Pirates and Boston Doves, also managing the Doves in 1909, and later in the minor leagues in a span of five seasons from 1913–1917.
  • February 22 - Bill Shettsline, 69, manager for the Philadelphia Phillies during five seasons spanning 1898–1902, who later owned the team from 1905 to 1909.

March[edit]

  • March 15 - Otis Stocksdale, 61, valuable utility who played all-positions except catcher for the Washington Senators, Boston Beaneaters and Baltimore Orioles from 1893 to 1896, while helping the Orioles win the National League pennant in 1896.
  • March 16 - Jack Wieneke, 39, pitcher who played briefly for the Chicago White Sox during the 1921 season.
  • March 20 - Dan Burke, 64, catcher/outfielder who played from 1890 to 1892 for the Rochester Broncos, Syracuse Stars and Boston Beaneaters.
  • March 21 - Bob Black, 70, outfielder/pitcher who played for the Kansas City Cowboys of the Union Association in 1884.
  • March 25 - Tom Donovan, 60, outfielder for the 1901 Cleveland Blues of the American League.
  • March 28 - Tom McCarthy, 48, pitcher who played from 1908 to 1909 with the Cincinnati Reds, Pittsburgh Pirates and Boston Doves.
  • March 29 - Harry Salisbury, 77, pitcher for the 1879 Troy Trojans of the National League and the 1882 Pittsburg Alleghenys of the American Association, who finished in the top ten in eighteen categories during the 1882 season, including wins (20), strikeouts (135), earned run average (2.63), complete games (32), and innings pitched (335).
  • March 29 - Ed Watkins, 55, outfielder for the 1902 Philadelphia Phillies.

April[edit]

  • April   2 - Joe Cross, 75, right fielder who played briefly for the Louisville Colonels during the 1888 season.
  • April 13 - Ody Abbott, 44, outfielder for the 1910 St. Louis Cardinals.
  • April 17 - Thomas Griffin, 76, first baseman for the Milwaukee Brewers of the Union Association in 1884.
  • April 23 - Tim Keefe, 76, Hall of Fame pitcher who posted a 342–225 record and a 2.63 ERA in 600 games, including six 30-win campaigns for the New York Metropolitans/Giants teams from 1883–1888, with 40-win seasons in 1883 and 1886, while leading the National League in ERA three times and strikeouts twice, with career strikeout mark (2500+) being record until 1908, also winning 19 straight in 1888, leading the Giants to their first pennant while going 4-0 with 0.51 ERA in the championship series.
  • April 26 - Roy Graham, 38, backup catcher who played from 1922 to 1923 for the Chicago White Sox.

May[edit]

  • May   1 - Bobby Mitchell, 77, National League pitcher who played for the Cincinnati Reds, Cleveland Blues and St. Louis Brown Stockings in parts of four seasons spanning 1877–1882.
  • May   3 - Lefty James, 43, pitcher who played from 1912 through 1914 for the Cleveland Naps of the American League.
  • May   5 - Steve Dunn, 74, Canadian first baseman who played for the 1884 St. Paul Saints of the Union Association.
  • May 17 - Bill Van Dyke, 69, outfielder who played with the Toledo Maumees, St. Louis Browns and Boston Beaneaters in a span of three years from 1890–1893.
  • May 19 - Wes Curry, 73, American Association umpire for six seasons between 1885 and 1898, who previously pitched two games for the Richmond Virginians in the 1884 season.
  • May 20 - Billy Lauder, 59, third baseman who played four seasons between 1898 and 1903 for the Philadelphia Phillies, Philadelphia Athletics and New York Giants, and later coached for the Chicago White Sox.
  • May 21 - Charlie Osterhout76, outfielder/catcher for the 1879 Syracuse Stars.of the National League.
  • May 22 - Bunny Pearce, 48, backup catcher for the Cincinnati Reds from 1908–1909.
  • May 24 - Phonney Martin, 87, player/manager for the 1872 Brooklyn Eckfords of the National Association, who also played for the 1872 Troy Trojans and the 1873 New York Mutuals.
  • May 30 - Burley Bayer, 59, shortstop for the 1889 Louisville Colonels of the American Association.

June[edit]

  • June  3 - Jack O'Brien, 60, outfielder for four clubs between 1899 and 2003, who became the first player to pinch-hit in World Series history, as a member of the 1903 Boston Americans.
  • June  5 - Sam LaRocque, 70, Canadian second baseman for the Detroit Wolverines, Pittsburgh Alleghenys/Pirates and Louisville Colonels in parts of three seasons spanning 1888–1891.
  • June 13 - Gat Stires, 83, outfielder who played from 1868 to 1871 for the Rockford Forest Citys of the National Association.

July[edit]

  • July  2 -Tommy Dowd, 64, center fielder for seven clubs in two different leagues between 1891 and 1901, mainly for the St. Louis Browns of the National League, who posted a career average of .271 with 368 stolen bases and also managed the Browns from 1896–1897.
  • July  7 - Neal Finn, 29, second baseman who played for the Brooklyn Robins/Dodgers and the Philadelphia Phillies from 1930 through 1933.
  • July 12 - Joseph Herr, 68, National League infielder/outfielder during three seasons from 1887–1890 for the Cleveland Blues and the St. Louis Browns.
  • July 23 - Rip Williams, 51, versatile utility who played in four seasons for the Boston Red Sox, Washington Senators and Cleveland Indians between 1911 and 1918.
  • July 30 - Frank Allen, 44, National League pitcher who played from 1912–1917 for the Brooklyn Dodgers/Robins, Pittsburgh Rebels and Boston Braves.

August[edit]

  • August  7 - Bill Irwin, 73, pitcher for the 1886 Cincinnati Red Stockings of the American Association.
  • August 10 - George Mangus, 43, outfielder who played for the 1912 Philadelphia Phillies.
  • August 13 - Elliot Bigelow, 35, outfielder for the Boston Red Sox in the 1929 season.

September[edit]

  • September   3 - Ed Cartwright, 73, first baseman for the St. Louis Browns in 1890 and the Washington Senators from 1894 to 1897, who collected seven runs batted in in one inning of an American Association game in 1890, setting a major league record that would stand for 109 years until it was broken by St. Louis Cardinals' Fernando Tatís, who belted two grand slams in one inning during a 1999 game to drive in eight runs.[5]
  • September 13 - Bill Brennan, 52, umpire who worked during seven seasons in the National League (1909–1913, 1921) and the Federal League (1914–1915), including the 1911 World Series, and also spent many years of umpiring in the minor leagues with the American Association and the Southern Association.
  • September 16 - George Gore, 76, center fielder who played 14 seasons in three leagues from 1879–1892, who batted a career .301 average, won the 1880 National League batting title and appeared in four World Series, while leading the league in walks three times and runs twice, and setting a single-game record with seven stolen bases.
  • September 22 - George Fields, 80, third baseman who played briefly for the Middletown Mansfields of the National Association during the 1872 season.
  • September 24 - Mike Donlin, 36, outfielder for six teams between 1899 and 1912; a superb hitter during the deadball era who topped the .300 mark in 10 of his 12 major league seasons, hitting .356 and leading the National League with 124 runs in 1905, then guiding the New York Giants with six hits in their 1905 World Series victory over the Philadelphia Athletics, while retiring with a .333 career average in 1050 games.
  • September 25 - Ring Lardner, 48, sports columnist and short story writer for several newspapers since 1907, mainly for the Chicago Tribune, who pioneered the satirical cynic's view of sports reporting in the early 1920s.

October[edit]

  • October   5 - William Veeck, Sr., 55, sports writer and baseball executive, who was president of the Chicago Cubs from 1919 until the time of his death, whose leadership led the Cubs win three National League pennants in the 1918, 1929 and 1932 seasons.
  • October 10 - Joe Kostal, 57, pitcher who played briefly for the 1896 Louisville Colonels.
  • October 13 - Al Mannassau, 67, minor league outfielder/manager during six seasons from 1890–1895, who later served as an umpire in the National League (1899), American League (1901), and the Federal League (1914).
  • October 20 - Lou Gertenrich, 58. outfielder who played with the Milwaukee Brewers and the Pittsburgh Pirates in a span of two seasons from 1901–1903.
  • October 22 - Bobby Clack, 83, English outfielder the Brooklyn Atlantics and the Cincinnati Reds from 1874 through 1876, who also served as an umpire during five games in 1876.
  • October 31 - Charlie Loudenslager, 52, second baseman who played in one game for the 1904 Brooklyn Superbas of the National League.

November[edit]

  • November   1 - Ed Scott, 63, pitcher from 1900–1901 for the Cincinnati Reds and Cleveland Blues.
  • November   2 - Lew Phelan, 69, manager for the 1895 St. Louis Browns of the National League.
  • November   5 - Frank Freund, 58, backup catcher for the 1896 Louisville Colonels.
  • November 18 - Charles Strick, 75, catcher/second baseman/centerfielder who played for the 1882 Louisville Eclipse of the American Association.
  • November 29 - John Humphries, 72, Canadian catcher/outfielder/first baseman who played from 1883 through 1885 for the New York Gothams of the National League and the Washington Nationals of the American Association.

December[edit]

  • December   7 - Fred Hoey, 68, manager for the 1899 New York Giants of the National League.
  • December 11 - Harry Croft, 58, National League OF/IF utility man who played in 1899 with the Louisville Colonels and the Philadelphia Phillies, before joining the Chicago Orphans in 1901.
  • December 17 - Charlie DeArmond, 56, third baseman for the 1903 Cincinnati Reds.
  • December 18 - Fred Robinson, 77, second baseman for the 1884 Cincinnati Outlaw Reds of the Union Association.
  • December 21 - Louie Heilbroner, 72, manager for the St. Louis Cardinals during the 1902 season.
  • December 22 - Nin Alexander, 75, catcher who played in 1884 for the Kansas City Unions of the Union Association and the St. Louis Browns of the American Association.
  • December 22 - Joe Flynn, 71, outfielder who played in 1884 for the Philadelphia Keystones and Boston Reds of the Union Association.
  • December 27 - Fritz Buelow, 57, fine defensive catcher during nine seasons from 1899–1907 for the St. Louis Perfectos/Cardinals, Detroit Tigers, Cleveland Naps and St. Louis Browns, who is regarded as the first ballplayer born in Berlin, Germany to appear in a major league game.
  • December 31 - James Donnelly, 66, third baseman for the 1884 Kansas City Cowboys of the Union Association.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p.210, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, NY, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0
  2. ^ Buddy Myers at Baseball Reference
  3. ^ Much More than a Game: Players, Owners, & American Baseball Since 1921, Robert F. Burk, p.50, University of North Carolina Press, ISBN 0-8078-2592-1
  4. ^ Baseball Reference (retrieved 26 June 2012)
  5. ^ Baseball Almanac – St. Louis Cardinals vs Los Angeles Dodgers, April 23, 1999 Box Score