1936 Marquette Golden Avalanche football team

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1936 Marquette Golden Avalanche football
Cotton Bowl Classic vs. TCU, L 16–6
Conference Independent
Ranking
AP #20
1936 record 7–2
Head coach Frank Murray (15th year)
Home stadium Marquette Stadium
Seasons
« 1935 1937 »

The 1936 Marquette Golden Avalanche football team represented Marquette University in the 1936 college football season. Marquette was led by long-time head coach Frank Murray. The team competed as a football independent and played their home games at Marquette Stadium in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The squad finished the season with a 7–2 record after losing to TCU in the inaugural Cotton Bowl Classic.

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result Attendance
October 3 at Wisconsin Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI W 12–6   34,000
October 10 vs. St. Louis Soldier FieldChicago, IL W 32–6   30,000
October 17 Kansas State Marquette StadiumMilwaukee, WI W 13–0   9,000
October 24 Michigan Statedagger Marquette Stadium • Milwaukee, WI W 13–7   19,000
October 30 vs. St. Mary's (CA) Soldier Field • Chicago, IL W 20–6   55,000
November 7 at Creighton Creighton StadiumOmaha, NE W 7–6   8,000
November 14 Mississippi Marquette Stadium • Milwaukee, WI W 33–0   17,000
November 21 at Duquesne Forbes FieldPittsburgh, PA L 13–0   27,871
January 1 vs. #16 TCU #20 Cotton BowlDallas, TX (Cotton Bowl Classic) L 16–6   17,000
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll.

Game notes[edit]

Wisconsin[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Marquette 6 0 6 0 12
Wisconsin 0 0 0 6 6
  • Location: Madison, Wisconsin
  • Game attendance: 34,000
Source:[1]

In their 1935 meeting, Marquette defeated the rival Wisconsin Badgers 33–0 and with many players returning from that squad entered the game as an eight to five favorite.[2] On the road at Camp Randall Stadium the Golden Avalanche were victorious 12–6.[1][3] Both of Marquette's touchdowns came on a pair of Arthur Guepe receptions from Ray Buivid in the first and third quarters.[1][3] The Badgers responded with their lone touchdown in the fourth quarter when Irv Windward threw a three-yard touchdown pass to Roy Bellin.[1] Although the Badgers outgained the Golden Avalanche in total offense 201 yards to 177, they lost the game 12–6.[3]

St. Louis[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
St. Louis 0 0 0 6 6
Marquette 6 7 7 12 32
  • Location: Chicago, Illinois
  • Game attendance: 30,000
Source:[4]

A week after their victory over Wisconsin to open the season, Marquette traveled to Soldier Field in Chicago and defeated the St. Louis Billikens 32–6.[4][5] The Golden Avalanche took a 6–0 lead on their first possession after driving 65-yards with Ray Buivid making the touchdown score after he recovered his own fumble from six-yards out.[6] Their lead was then extended further to 13–0 on the second play of the second quarter when Arthur Guepe scored on a 72-yard touchdown run.[4][6] After a Guepe touchdown run extended the Marquette lead to 20–0 in the third, the Golden Avalanche scored on a pair of fourth-quarter touchdowns. Both scores came on touchdown passes to Raymond Sonnenberg, the first from Guepe and the second from Buivid. The Billikens did score a late touchdown to ruin the shutout after Ralph Hemp connected with Carl Totsch for a 35-yard touchdown. Marquette outgained St. Louis in total offense 318 yards to 91 in their 32–6 victory.[6]

Kansas State[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Kansas State 0 0 0 0 0
Marquette 0 0 0 13 13
  • Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • Game attendance: 9,000
Source:[7]

In the first game played at Marquette Stadium for the season, the Golden Avalanche defeated the Kansas State Wildcats 13–0.[7][8] After a scoreless tie through three quarters, Marquette scored a touchdown on the second play of the fourth quarter when Al Guepe scored on a three-yard run.[7] Arthur Guepe then scored the final Golden Avalanche points later in the quarter.[7] Although the Wildcats outgained Marquette in total offensive yardage 164 to 127 yards, the Golden Avalanche won 13–0.[8]

Michigan State[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan State 0 0 7 0 7
Marquette 0 6 0 7 13
  • Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • Game attendance: 19,000
Source:[9]

On homecoming at Marquette, the Golden Avalanche defeated the previously unbeaten Michigan State Spartans 13–7.[9][10] After a scoreless first quarter, Marquette scored first after Ray Buivid threw a 40-yard touchdown pass to Arthur Guepe to give the Golden Avalanche a 6–0 halftime lead.[10] In the third quarter, the Spartans took a 7–6 lead after John Pingel threw a seven-yard touchdown strike to Ernest Bremer.[10] Trailing for the first time all season, Marquette secured the 13–7 victory with a fourth-quarter touchdown. The score came on a Ray Buivid touchdown pass to Herbert Anderson.[10]

St. Mary's[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
St. Mary's 6 0 0 0 6
Marquette 13 0 0 7 20
  • Location: Chicago, Illinois
  • Game attendance: 55,000
Source:[11]

Before the largest crowd to ever witness a Marquette football game at Chicago's Soldier Field, the Golden Avalanche defeated the St. Mary's Gaels 20–6.[11][12] Ray Buivid scored the first touchdown of the game on a 13-yard run to give Marquette a 7–0 lead.[12] On the ensuing Gaels drive, St. Mary's quarterback Edward O'Laughlin threw an interception that was returned by Buivid 75-yards for a touchdown and a 13–0 Golden Avalanche lead.[12] O'Laughlin responded on the ensuing 65-yard drive with a rushing touchdown to cut the Marquette lead to 13–6.[12] The final points of the game came late in the fourth quarter when Red Higgins caught a deflected Buivid pass for a touchdown.[11] The 20–6 loss by the Gaels was their worst intersectional defeat since Slip Madigan took over as their head coach in 1921.[13]

Creighton[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Marquette 0 0 0 7 7
Creighton 0 6 0 0 6
  • Location: Omaha, Nebraska
  • Game attendance: 8,000
Source:[14]

In the 1936 homecoming game for the Creighton Bluejays, the visiting Golden Avalanche did not score an offensive touchdown, but was able to secure a 7–6 victory to remain undefeated for the season.[14][15] After a scoreless first, Creighton scored the first points of the game in the second quarter. Frank Wilcox intercepted a Ray Buivid pass and returned it for a touchdown.[14] Frank Jones then missed the extra point and the Bluejays took a 6–0 lead, which they retained through the fourth quarter.[14] In the fourth, Arthur Guepe returned a Creighton punt 80-yards for an apparent touchdown only to be called back due to a Marquette offsides penalty.[15] After failing to score on the ensuing drive and holding the Bluejays scoreless on their next possession, Guepe returned the next Creighton punt 75-yards for a game tying touchdown.[15] Ward Cuff then successfully converted the extra point and the Golden Avalanche took a 7–6 lead that they would not relinquish to remain undefeated.[15]

Mississippi[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Mississippi 0 0 0 0 0
Marquette 0 13 7 13 33
  • Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • Game attendance: 17,000
Source:[16]

In the final regular season home game, Marquette shutout the Mississippi Rebels 33–0.[16][17] After a scoreless first, Arthur Guepe scored the first of his three touchdowns on a 14-yard run in the second quarter to give Marquette a 7–0 lead after a successful extra point.[17] Later in the period, Ray Buivid threw a five-yard touchdown strike to Raymond Sonnenberg to cap an 11-play, 80-yard drive.[17] The Golden Avalanche lead was then extended to 20–0 after a one-yard Guepe touchdown run in the third quarter.[17] In the fourth quarter, Guepe scored his final touchdown of the game on a 40-yard punt return and Buivid connected with LeRoy McMahon on a 27-yard touchdown pass to make the final score 33–0.[16][17]

Duquesne[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Marquette 0 0 0 0 0
Duquesne 6 0 0 7 13
  • Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Game attendance: 27,871
Source:[18]

Before the largest crowd to ever see Duquesne play at Forbes Field, the Dukes shutout the favored Golden Avalanche 13–0 for their first loss of the season.[18][19][20] Boyd Brumbaugh was responsible for both of the Dukes' touchdowns. The first came on a Brumbaugh pass to Ernie Hefferle in the first and the second on a three-yard run in the fourth quarter.[18]

TCU[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
#20 Marquette 6 0 0 0 6
• #16 TCU 10 6 0 0 16
  • Location: Dallas, Texas
  • Game attendance: 17,000
Source:[21][22]

With a regular season record of 7–1, on December 16 the TCU Horned Frogs were granted permission from the Southwest Conference to compete against the Golden Avalanche in the inaugural Cotton Bowl Classic in Dallas, Texas.[22][23] Billed as a battle between college football's two most prolific passes of the previous two seasons, TCU's Sammy Baugh and Marquette's Ray Buivid, the Horned Frogs prevailed 16–6.[24][25] L. D. Meyer opened the scoring with a 33-yard field goal to give TCU an early 3–0 lead.[26] The Avalanche responded with their only points of the game later in the quarter when Arthur Guepe returned a punt 60-yards to give Marquette their only lead of the game at 6–3.[22][25] The Horned Frogs retook the lead at the end of the first quarter when Baugh threw a 55-yard touchdown pass to Meyer to give TCU a 10–6 lead which they would not relinquish.[26] The final points of the game came in the second quarter on an 18-yard Vic Montgomery touchdown strike again to Meyer to give the Horned Frogs the 16–6 victory.[26]

Personnel[edit]

Coaching staff[edit]

The Golden Avalanche was led by head coach Frank Murray who entered his 15th season in that role at Marquette. He resigned his position in February 1937 to assume the role of head coach at Virginia.[27]

Name Position Seasons at
Marquette
Alma Mater
Frank Murray Head coach 15 Tufts (1908)
Red Dunn Backfield coach Marquette (1923)
John Taylor Line coach 8 Ohio State
Reference:[28]

Players[edit]

References:[29][30]

References[edit]

General

  • Kneeland, Joseph; Riordan, Robert, eds. (1937). The Hilltop. Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Raynor Memorial Libraries, Marquette University. pp. 72–91. Retrieved October 11, 2011. 

Specific

  1. ^ a b c d The Hilltop, p. 77
  2. ^ "Marquette rules 8–5 favorite to defeat Wisconsin Saturday". The Milwaukee Journal. October 2, 1936. Retrieved October 11, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c Kuechle, Oliver E. (October 4, 1936). "Fighting Badgers hold Marquette to 12–6 score". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved October 10, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c The Hilltop, p. 78
  5. ^ Barry, Howard (October 11, 1936). "St. Louis crushed by Marquette eleven, 36 to 2". The Chicago Tribune. Retrieved October 11, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b c Walfroot, Cleon (October 11, 1936). "Hilltops win St. Louis tilt easily, 36–2". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved October 10, 2011. 
  7. ^ a b c d The Hilltop, p. 79
  8. ^ a b Walfroot, Cleon (October 18, 1936). "Hilltop passes beat fighting Kansas State, 13–0". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved October 10, 2011. 
  9. ^ a b The Hilltop, pp. 80–81
  10. ^ a b c d Walfroot, Cleon (October 24, 1936). "Marquette beats Michigan State, 13–7". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved October 11, 2011. 
  11. ^ a b c The Hilltop, p. 82
  12. ^ a b c d Walfroot, Cleon (October 31, 1936). "Buivid shows All-American class as Hilltops down Gaels, 20–6". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved October 10, 2011. 
  13. ^ "Gaels handed worst defeat". The Pittsburgh Press. October 31, 1936. Retrieved October 11, 2011. 
  14. ^ a b c d The Hilltop, p. 83
  15. ^ a b c d Walfroot, Cleon (November 7, 1936). "Marquette beats Creighton, 7–6". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved October 12, 2011. 
  16. ^ a b c The Hilltop, p. 84
  17. ^ a b c d e Walfroot, Cleon (November 15, 1936). "Art Guepe scored three touchdowns". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved October 10, 2011. 
  18. ^ a b c The Hilltop, p. 85
  19. ^ Walfroot, Cleon (November 22, 1936). "Duquesne ends Marquette streak, 13–0". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved October 10, 2011. 
  20. ^ Biederman, Lester (November 22, 1936). "Dukes snap Marquette's win streak, 13–0". The Pittsburgh Press. Retrieved October 10, 2011. 
  21. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). "Bowl/All-Star Game Records: Major Bowl Game Attendance" (PDF). 2011 NCAA Division I Football Records. NCAA.org. p. 33. Retrieved October 10, 2011. 
  22. ^ a b c The Hilltop, p. 86
  23. ^ "Marquette-Texas Christian game all set for Cotton Bowl Jan. 1". The Milwaukee Journal. Associated Press. December 16, 1936. Retrieved October 12, 2011. 
  24. ^ "Nations two best passers clash in Cotton Bowl". The Pittsburgh Press. United Press. December 20, 1936. Retrieved October 12, 2011. 
  25. ^ a b Walfroot, Cleon (January 2, 1937). "TCU passes give Hilltop 16–6 beating". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved October 12, 2011. 
  26. ^ a b c "1937 Cotton Bowl Classic Game Summary" (PDF). AT&T Cotton Bowl Classic. October 5, 2011. 
  27. ^ "Murray leaves Marquette for Virginia post". The Milwaukee Journal. February 14, 1937. Retrieved October 11, 2011. 
  28. ^ The Hilltop, p. 75
  29. ^ The Hilltop, p. 76
  30. ^ Marquette University Archives. "Marquette football team, 1936". Flickr.com. Retrieved October 11, 2011.