1939 in poetry

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            List of years in poetry       (table)
... 1929 . 1930 . 1931 . 1932 . 1933 . 1934 . 1935 ...
1936 1937 1938 -1939- 1940 1941 1942
... 1943 . 1944 . 1945 . 1946 . 1947 . 1948 . 1949 ...
   In literature: 1936 1937 1938 -1939- 1940 1941 1942     
Art . Archaeology . Architecture . Literature . Music . Philosophy . Science +...
As the clever hopes expire

Of a low dishonest decade

W. H. Auden, from "September 1, 1939"

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

Events[edit]

Works published in English[edit]

Canada[edit]

India, in English[edit]

New Zealand[edit]

  • Ursula Bethell, Day and Night : Poems 1924-34, by the author of 'Time and Place, Christchurch: Caxton Press[6]
  • Charles Brasch, The Land and the People, and Other Poems, Christchurch: Caxton Press[7]
  • Allen Curnow, Not in Narrow Seas, Christchurch: Caxton Press[8]

United Kingdom[edit]

United States[edit]

Other in English[edit]

Works published in other languages[edit]

France[edit]

  • Aimé Césaire, Cahier d'un retour au pays natal ("Notebook of a Return to My Native Land"), a landmark work in French Caribbean literature, which had previously been characterized by literary works derrivative of European models and often marked by exoticism; this book-length poem, according to Bonnie Thomas, "laid the foundations for a new literary style in which Caribbean writers came to reject the alienating gaze of the Other in favour of their own Caribbean interpretation of reality", a change expressed in the theory of négritude; Martinique poet published in France,[12] Volontés (Paris), August; (enlarged edition in book format, 1947; definitive edition, 1956)
  • Paul Éluard, pen name of Paul-Eugène Grindel, Chanson complète[13]
  • Luc Estang, Transhumances[13]
  • Leon-Paul Fargue, Le Piéton de Paris[14]
  • Tristan Tzara, Midis gagnés[14]

Indian subcontinent[edit]

Including all of the British colonies that later became India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal. Listed alphabetically by first name, regardless of surname:

Urdu[edit]

Other Indian languages[edit]

Other languages[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

United States[edit]

Births[edit]

Death years link to the corresponding "[year] in poetry" article:

Yeats' gravestone, with his famous epitaph, erected 1948.

Deaths[edit]

Birth years link to the corresponding "[year] in poetry" article:

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Carole Gerson, ""Arthur Stanley Bourinot Biography". jrank.org. Archived from the original on February 20, 2010. ," Encyclopedia of Literature, 7466, JRank.org, Web, Apr. 20, 2011.
  2. ^ "Anne Marriott (1913-1997)", Canadian Woman Poets, BrockU.ca, Web, Apr. 21, 2011.
  3. ^ Vinayak Krishna Gokak, The Golden Treasury Of Indo-Anglian Poetry (1828-1965), p 316, New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi (1970, first edition; 2006 reprint), ISBN 81-260-1196-3, retrieved August 6, 2010
  4. ^ Vinayak Krishna Gokak, The Golden Treasury Of Indo-Anglian Poetry (1828-1965), p 319, New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi (1970, first edition; 2006 reprint), ISBN 81-260-1196-3, retrieved August 6, 2010
  5. ^ Vinayak Krishna Gokak, The Golden Treasury Of Indo-Anglian Poetry (1828-1965), p 322, New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi (1970, first edition; 2006 reprint), ISBN 81-260-1196-3, retrieved August 6, 2010
  6. ^ Web page titled "Ursula Bethell / New Zealand Literature File" at the University of Auckland Library website, accessed April 30, 2008
  7. ^ Web page titled "Charles Brasch: New Zealand Literature File" at the University of Auckland Library website, accessed April 26, 2008
  8. ^ Allen Curnow Web page at the New Zealand Book Council website, accessed April 21, 2008
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Cox, Michael, ed. (2004). The Concise Oxford Chronology of English Literature. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-860634-6. 
  10. ^ "Works by Enoch Powell". enochpowell.net. [dead link]
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Ludwig, Richard M., and Clifford A. Nault, Jr., Annals of American Literature: 1602–1983, 1986, New York: Oxford University Press
  12. ^ Thomas, Bonnie, "Aimé Césaire", article in The Literary Encyclopedia, retrieved August 5, 2009. Archived 2009-08-11.
  13. ^ a b Bree, Germaine, Twentieth-Century French Literature, translated by Louise Guiney, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1983
  14. ^ a b Auster, Paul, editor, The Random House Book of Twentieth-Century French Poetry: with Translations by American and British Poets, New York: Random House, 1982 ISBN 0-394-52197-8
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Das, Sisir Kumar, "A Chronology of Literary Events / 1911–1956", in Das, Sisir Kumar and various, History of Indian Literature: 1911-1956: struggle for freedom: triumph and tragedy, Volume 2, 1995, published by Sahitya Akademi, ISBN 978-81-7201-798-9, retrieved via Google Books on December 23, 2008
  16. ^ Eugenio Montale, Collected Poems 1920-1954, translated and edited by Jonathan Galassi, New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1998, ISBN 0-374-12554-6
  17. ^ a b Web page titled "César Vallejo" at the website of the Academy of American Poets, retrieved August 28, 2011
  18. ^ http://www.canadacouncil.ca/NR/rdonlyres/E22B9A3C-5906-41B8-B39C-F91F58B3FD70/0/cumulativewinners2010rev.pdf "Cumulative List of Winners of the Governor General's Literary Awards", Canada Council. Web, Feb. 10, 2011. http://www.canadacouncil.ca/NR/rdonlyres/E22B9A3C-5906-41B8-B39C-F91F58B3FD70/0/cumulativewinners2010rev.pdf
  19. ^ Fox, Margalit, "Diane Wood Middlebrook, Biographer, Dies at 68", obituary, The New York Times, December 17, 2007, retrieved December 10, 2008