1943 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1943 throughout the world.  

Champions[edit]

Major League Baseball[edit]

Other champions[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

Statistical leaders[edit]

American League National League
AVG Luke Appling CHW .328 Stan Musial STL .357
HR Rudy York DET 34 Bill Nicholson CHC 29
RBI Rudy York DET 118 Bill Nicholson CHC 128
Wins Spud Chandler NYY
Dizzy Trout DET
20 Mort Cooper STL
Elmer Riddle CIN
Rip Sewell PIT
21
ERA Spud Chandler NYY 1.64 Max Lanier STL 1.90
Ks Allie Reynolds CLE 151 Johnny Vander Meer CIN 174

Major league baseball final standings[edit]

American League final standings[edit]

American League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
1st New York Yankees 98   56 .636    --
2nd Washington Senators 84   69 .549   13.5
3rd Cleveland Indians 82   71 .536   15.5
3rd Chicago White Sox 82   72 .532   16.0
5th Detroit Tigers 78   76 .506   20.0
6th St. Louis Browns 72   80 .474   25.0
7th Boston Red Sox 68   84 .461   29.0
8th Philadelphia Athletics 49   105 .318   49.0

National League final standings[edit]

National League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
1st St. Louis Cardinals 105   49 .682    --
2nd Cincinnati Reds 87   67 .565   18.0
3rd Brooklyn Dodgers 81   72 .529   23.5
4th Pittsburgh Pirates 80   74 .519   25.0
5th Chicago Cubs 74   79 .484   30.5
6th Boston Braves 68   85 .444   36.5
7th Philadelphia Phillies 64   90 .416   41.0
8th New York Giants 55   98 .359   49.5

Negro league baseball final standings[edit]

Negro American League final standings[edit]

Negro American League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Birmingham Black Barons 20 14 .588
Memphis Red Sox 15 11 .577
Cleveland Buckeyes 25 20 .556
Kansas City Monarchs 29 29 .500
Chicago American Giants 20 23 .465
Cincinnati Clowns 15 18 .455
  • Birmingham won one half; Chicago won the other half.
  • Birmingham beat Chicago 3 games to 2 games in a play-off.

Negro National League final standings[edit]

Negro National League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Washington Homestead Grays 44 15 .746
Baltimore Elite Giants 15 26 .366
New York Cubans 23 16 .590
Philadelphia Stars 26 21 .553
Newark Eagles 19 20 .487
New York Black Yankees 0 8 .000

Events[edit]

  • November 23 - Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis rules that Philadelphia Phillies owner William D. Cox is permanently ineligible to hold office or be employed for having bet on his own team. The Carpenter family of Delaware will buy the Philadelphia club and Bob Carpenter, at age 28, will become president. The Phillies, in an effort to change their image, will conduct a contest for a new name. The winning entry, the Philadelphia Blue Jays, submitted by a Mrs. John Crooks, will be the unofficial team name for 1944-45 until abandoned in 1946.
  • December 2 - With only nine leagues operating during the season, the minor league convention in New York has an incipient revolt to oust longtime head William G. Bramham in favor of Frank Shaughnessy, president of the International League, who had five pledges. But Bramham rules that 15 non operating circuits which had paid dues are eligible to vote. Five of the leagues had given proxies. A later appeal to Commissioner Landis fails.

Births[edit]

January–April[edit]

May–August[edit]

September–December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

  • January 3 - Bid McPhee, 83, second baseman for Cincinnati from 1882 to 1899 who was the last at his position to play without a glove; scored 100 runs ten times, set every career fielding mark at his position and was seventh player to reach 2000 hits
  • January 3 - Jim Tyack, 83, outfielder for the 1943 Philadelphia Athletics
  • March 6 - Jimmy Collins, 73, third baseman who batted .300 five times and led NL in home runs in 1898; led league in putouts five times and set career records for putouts, total chances and double plays at third base; after jumping to the American League, managed Boston to upset victory in inaugural 1903 World Series
  • April 26 - Bob Emslie, 84, umpire who set records with 35 seasons of officiating and over 1000 games worked single-handedly; as pitcher, won 32 games for 1884 Baltimore Orioles
  • May 6 - William Slocum, 59, sportswriter and editor for several New York newspapers since 1910
  • May 23 - Pat Malone, 40, pitcher who led the National League with 22 wins in 1929, and with 20 wins and 166 strikeouts in 1930
  • June 21 - Chet Chadbourne, 58, outfielder for the Boston Red Sox, Kansas City Packers and Boston Braves, who became a minor league institution after collecting 3.216 hits over 21 minors seasons, and later managed and umpired at the same level
  • August 14 - Joe Kelley, 71, left fielder who batted .317 lifetime, including marks over .360 for the 1894-97 Baltimore Orioles; 194 triples ranked 4th all-time upon retirement, and had six seasons of 100 runs and five of 100 RBI
  • August 15 - Art Whitney, 85, infielder who played for eight teams during his 11-season career, from 1880 to 1891.
  • August 27 - Frank Truesdale, 59, second baseman who played from 1910 to 1918 for the St. Louis Browns, New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox
  • September 1 - Joe Connolly, 59, Boston Braves left fielder, who was the offensive star of the 1914 "Miracle Braves" World Champions
  • September 5 - George Ferguson, 60, pitcher for the New York Giants and the Boston Doves/Rustlers from 1906–1911, who led the National League in saves in 1906
  • December 18 - Bill Conway, 82, 19th century catcher who played for the Philadelphia Quakers and Baltimore Orioles

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ All-American Girls Professional Baseball League Record Book – W. C. Madden. Publisher: McFarland & Company, 2000. Format: Softcover, 294pp. Language: English. ISBN 978-0-7864-3747-4]
  2. ^ ESPN Page 2 – Reel Life: A League of Their Own - Article by Jeff Merron

External links[edit]