1943 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1943 throughout the world.

Champions[edit]

Major League Baseball[edit]

Other champions[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

Statistical leaders[edit]

American League National League
AVG Luke Appling CHW .328 Stan Musial STL .357
HR Rudy York DET 34 Bill Nicholson CHC 29
RBI Rudy York DET 118 Bill Nicholson CHC 128
Wins Spud Chandler NYY
Dizzy Trout DET
20 Mort Cooper STL
Elmer Riddle CIN
Rip Sewell PIT
21
ERA Spud Chandler NYY 1.64 Max Lanier STL 1.90
Ks Allie Reynolds CLE 151 Johnny Vander Meer CIN 174

Major league baseball final standings[edit]

American League final standings[edit]

American League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
1st New York Yankees 98   56 .636    --
2nd Washington Senators 84   69 .549   13.5
3rd Cleveland Indians 82   71 .536   15.5
3rd Chicago White Sox 82   72 .532   16.0
5th Detroit Tigers 78   76 .506   20.0
6th St. Louis Browns 72   80 .474   25.0
7th Boston Red Sox 68   84 .461   29.0
8th Philadelphia Athletics 49   105 .318   49.0

National League final standings[edit]

National League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
1st St. Louis Cardinals 105   49 .682    --
2nd Cincinnati Reds 87   67 .565   18.0
3rd Brooklyn Dodgers 81   72 .529   23.5
4th Pittsburgh Pirates 80   74 .519   25.0
5th Chicago Cubs 74   79 .484   30.5
6th Boston Braves 68   85 .444   36.5
7th Philadelphia Phillies 64   90 .416   41.0
8th New York Giants 55   98 .359   49.5

Negro league baseball final standings[edit]

Negro American League final standings[edit]

Negro American League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Birmingham Black Barons 20 14 .588
Memphis Red Sox 15 11 .577
Cleveland Buckeyes 25 20 .556
Kansas City Monarchs 29 29 .500
Chicago American Giants 20 23 .465
Cincinnati Clowns 15 18 .455
  • Birmingham won one half; Chicago won the other half.
  • Birmingham beat Chicago 3 games to 2 games in a play-off.

Negro National League final standings[edit]

Negro National League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Washington Homestead Grays 44 15 .746
Baltimore Elite Giants 15 26 .366
New York Cubans 23 16 .590
Philadelphia Stars 26 21 .553
Newark Eagles 19 20 .487
New York Black Yankees 0 8 .000

Events[edit]

  • November 23 - Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis rules that Philadelphia Phillies owner William D. Cox is permanently ineligible to hold office or be employed for having bet on his own team. The Carpenter family of Delaware will buy the Philadelphia club and Bob Carpenter, at age 28, will become president. The Phillies, in an effort to change their image, will conduct a contest for a new name. The winning entry, the Philadelphia Blue Jays, submitted by a Mrs. John Crooks, will be the unofficial team name for 1944-45 until abandoned in 1946.
  • December 2 - With only nine leagues operating during the season, the minor league convention in New York has an incipient revolt to oust longtime head William G. Bramham in favor of Frank Shaughnessy, president of the International League, who had five pledges. But Bramham rules that 15 non operating circuits which had paid dues are eligible to vote. Five of the leagues had given proxies. A later appeal to Commissioner Landis fails.

Births[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January[edit]

  • January   3 – Bid McPhee, 83, Hall of Fame second baseman who played his entire 18-year career with the Cincinnati Reds, beginning in 1882 when the organization was a part of the American Association and called the Red Stockings, widely regarded as one of the best defensive second basemen in the 19th century, even though he took the field without benefit of a glove, retiring in 1899 with a career .272 batting average, 2,258 hits, 1,684 runs, 189 triples, 568 stolen bases and a .944 fielding average, while also managing the Reds in 1901 and 1902.

February[edit]

  • February   3 – Jake Virtue, 77, first baseman who played from 1890 through 1894 for the Cleveland Spiders.
  • February   4 – Frank Dwyer, 74, pitcher for five teams in a span of twelve years from 1888–1899, who posted a 176–152 record and a 3.85 ERA in 365 pitching appearances, including two 20-win season, 12 shutouts and 270 complete games.
  • February   7 – Floyd Ritter, 72, backup catcher for the 1890 Toledo Maumees of the American Association.
  • February   8 – Dan Casey, 80, pitcher who posted a 96-90 record with a 2.18 earned run average for four teams in seven seasons from 1884–1890, twice winning more than 20 games for the Philadelphia Quakers, while leading the National League in 1887 in both ERA (2.86) and shutouts (4), and ending third in W–L% {6.83) and fourth in wins (28).
  • February 11 – Ralph McLaurin, 57, fourth outfielder for the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1908 season.
  • February 12 – Bart Cantz, 83, catcher who played from 1888 through 1890 with the Baltimore Orioles and the Philadelphia Athletics of the American Association.
  • February 15 – John Deering, pitcher who played in 1903 with the Detroit Tigers and the New York Highlanders of the American League.

March[edit]

  • March   2 – Earle Gardner, 59, backup infielder who played from 1908 through 1912 for the New York Highlanders of the American League.
  • March   3 – Bill Whaley, 44, outfielder for the 1923 St. Louis Browns of the American League.
  • March   6 – Jimmy Collins, 73, Hall of Fame third baseman and manager who spent the majority of his fourteen-year Major League career in Boston with either the Beaneaters and the Americans; a fine hitter but best remembered for his defensive play at third base, whether it setting up defensively away from the bag or mastering the art of defense against the bunt; a .300 hitter five times, with a high of .346 in 1897, he won the National League home run crown with 15 in 1898, driving in well over 100 runs in both seasons and scoring more than 100 runs four times; specifically credited with having developed the barehanded pickup and off-balance throw to first base in defending bunts, his 601 total chances accepted at third base in 1899 remain a National League record, additionally leading his league's third basemen in putouts five times, assists four times, double plays twice, he still stands second all-time in career putouts at third base, and also managed the Americans to two American League pennants and a triumph over the Pittsburgh Pirates in the first modern World Series in 1903.
  • March 13 – Earl Smith, 52, corner outfielder and third baseman for the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Browns and Washington Senators in seven seasons from 1916 through 1923.
  • March 20 – Heinie Wagner, shortstop who played for the New York Giants and the Boston Red Sox in a span of 14 seasons from 1902–1918, and later managed the Red Sox in 1930.
  • March 21 – Joe Daly, 74, outfielder and catcher for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Spiders and Boston Beaneaters during three seasons from 1890–1892.
  • March 30 – Tex McDonald, 52, right fielder who played from 1912 to 1913 with the Cincinnati Reds and Boston Braves of the National League, and for the Pittsburgh Rebels and Buffalo Buffeds/Blues of the Federal League from 1914 to 1915.

April[edit]

  • April   1 – Pat Deasley, 85, Irish bare-handed catcher who played from 1881 through 1888 for the Boston Red Caps, St. Louis Browns, New York Giants and Washington Nationals.
  • April 11 – Tom Knowlson, 47, pitcher for the 1915 Philadelphia Athletics.
  • April 22 – Kirby White, 59, pitcher for the Boston Doves and the Pittsburgh Pirates in three seasons from 1909 to 1911.
  • April 23 – Cliff Curtis, 61, pitcher who played for the Boston Doves/Rustlers, Chicago Cubs, Philadelphia Phillies and Brooklyn Dodgers during five seasons from 1909 to 1913.
  • April 26 - Bob Emslie, 84, Canadian umpire who set records with 35 seasons of officiating and over 1000 games worked single-handedly, and previously, as a pitcher, won 32 games for the 1884 Baltimore Orioles of the American Association.
  • April 26 – Gene McCann, 66, pitcher for the Brooklyn Superbas in the 1901 and 1902 seasons.
  • April 28 - Dennis Berran, 55, outfielder for the 1912 Chicago White Sox.
  • April 29 – Elijah Jones, 61, pitcher who played for the Detroit Tigers in 1907 and 1909.

May[edit]

  • May   6 – William J. Slocum, 59, sportswriter and editor for several New York newspapers since 1910.
  • May 13 – Pat Malone, 40, pitcher who led the National League with 22 wins in 1929, and with 20 wins and 166 strikeouts in 1930.

June[edit]

  • June 21 – Chet Chadbourne, 58, outfielder for the Boston Red Sox, Kansas City Packers and Boston Braves, who became a Minor League institution after collecting 3,216 hits over 21 seasons, and also managed and umpired at the same level.

July[edit]

August[edit]

  • August 11 – Fred Woodcock, 75, pitcher for the 1892 Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League.
  • August 16 – Beals Becker, 57, outfielder for five teams during eight seasons spanning 1908–1915, who made a name for himself in the Major Leagues as a dangerous slugger, ranking four times among the top-ten in home runs in the National League, while becoming the first player to hit two pinch-hit home runs in a single season, and the first to hit two inside-the-park homers in the same game.
  • August 14 – Joe Kelley, 71, Hall of Fame outfielder who along with John McGraw, Willie Keeler and Hughie Jennings made up the Big Four of the great Baltimore Orioles teams of the middle 1890s, playing on six pennant-winning teams during his 17-year stint in the Major Leagues and finishing with a .317 career batting average, 443 stolen bases, .402 on-base percentage and 194 triples, also driving in 100 or more runs in five straight seasons and scoring over 100 runs six times, while posting a lifetime .955 fielding percentage in the outfield to go along with 212 assists.
  • August 15 - Art Whitney, 85, third baseman and shortstop who played for eight teams during eleven seasons from 1880 to 1891, also a member of the New York Giants clubs that won the World Series in 1888 and 1889.
  • August 27 - Frank Truesdale, 59, second baseman who played from 1910 to 1918 for the St. Louis Browns, New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox.

September[edit]

  • September   1 – Eddie Matteson, 58, pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1914 and the Washington Senators in 1918.
  • September   4 – Harry Hardy, 67, pitcher for the Washington Senators in the 1905 and 1906 seasons.
  • September   5 – Cecil Ferguson, 60, pitcher for the New York Giants and the Boston Doves/Rustlers in six seasons from 1906–1911, who led the National League in saves in 1906.
  • September 11 – Kid Durbin, 57, pitcher who played from 1907 to 1909 with the Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Reds and Pittsburgh Pirates.
  • September 14 – Bill Murray, 50, second baseman for the 1917 Washington Senators.
  • September 22 – Larry Hesterfer, 65, pitcher for the New York Giants during the 1901 season, who is best known as the only player to have hit into a triple play in his first at bat in Major League history.

October[edit]

  • October 15 – Joe Rickert, 66, outfielder who played for the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1898 season and the Boston Beaneaters in 1901.
  • October 23 – Heinie Peitz, 72, catcher for four teams in a span of 16 seasons from 1892–1913, who formed part of the famed Pretzel Battery along with pitcher Ted Breitenstein while playing for the St. Louis Browns and the Cincinnati Reds in the 1890s.
  • October 30 – Frank Whitney, 87, outfielder who played for the Boston Red Caps in the 1876 season.

November[edit]

  • November   7 – Bill Wolff, 67, pitcher for the 1902 Philadelphia Phillies.
  • November 10 – Charlie Bastian, 71, shortstop who played for seven teams in four different Major Leagues during eight seasons spanning 1884–1891.
  • November 16 – Frank McPartlin, 71, pitcher for the New York Giants in the 1899 season.

December[edit]

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ All-American Girls Professional Baseball League Record Book – W. C. Madden. Publisher: McFarland & Company, 2000. Format: Softcover, 294pp. Language: English. ISBN 978-0-7864-3747-4]
  2. ^ ESPN Page 2 – Reel Life: A League of Their Own - Article by Jeff Merron

External links[edit]