1946 Indianapolis 500

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
30th Indianapolis 500
Indy500winningcar1946.JPG
Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis 500
Sanctioning body AAA
Date May 30, 1946
Winner George Robson
Winning Entrant Thorne Engineering
Average speed 114.820 mph (184.785 km/h)
Pole position Cliff Bergere
Pole speed 126.471 mph (203.535 km/h)
Most laps led George Robson (138)
Pre-race
Pace car Lincoln Continental
Pace car driver Henry Ford II
Chronology
Previous Next
1941 1947

The 1946 International 500-Mile Sweepstakes Race was the 30th running of the Indianapolis 500. It was held at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Thursday, May 30, 1946. This was the first Indianapolis 500 presided over by new track owner Tony Hulman. The track had closed in late 1941 due to World War II, and over the next four years, the facility fell into a terrible state of disrepair. Hulman purchased the Speedway in November 1945, and quickly went to work cleaning up the grounds, which had become overwhelmed by overgrowth and weeds. The Speedway re-opened, and the 1946 race was considered a rousing success.

Race winner George Robson would be killed in a racing crash just months after the victory.

The 1946 running of the 500 was the first of sixty-one consecutive years (1946-2006) that featured popular fixture Tom Carnegie on the Speedway public address system.[1]

During the pre-race ceremonies, James Melton performed the song "Back Home Again in Indiana." It was the first time the traditional song had been performed before the start of the race.[2]

Event details[edit]

Time trials[edit]

The first day of time trials was held on Saturday May 18. Wind and rain kept the cars off the track for over four hours. Cliff Bergere was the first car to qualify,[3][4] and his four-lap qualifying speed clinched the pole position.

On Sunday, May 26, Ralph Hepburn, driving a brand-new Novi Governor front-drive special, shattered the one and four-lap track records with speeds of 134.449 and 133.944 miles per hour, respectively. He would start the race in 19th position.

Race[edit]

At the start, Mauri Rose tied an Indy record by leading the first lap from the 9th starting position. Attrition was high in the first race after WWII, as three of the first four cars on the grid were out before the 50 mile mark.

George Robson took the lead for good on lap 93, and led the rest of the way. Robson's six-cylinder Sparks was the first 6-cylinder winning car since Ray Harroun in 1911. Rookie Jimmy Jackson finished second, at the relatively close margin of 44 seconds.

Ted Horn made two lengthy pit stops and fell seven laps behind the last running car. Horn returned to the track, and charged all the way up third place at the finish. Horn was the fastest car on the track in the second half, and he completed the entire 500 miles, but was 12 minutes behind Robson.

A mild controversy came about after the race, as race winner George Robson was accused of breaking the rules by not exiting the cockpit of the car during pit stops. A protest was filed, but it was later dismissed.[5]

Results[edit]

Finish Start No Name Qual Rank Laps Led Status
1 15 16 Canada George Robson 125.541 5 200 138 Running
2 5 61 United States Jimmy Jackson (R) 120.257 24 200 5 Running
3 7 29 United States Ted Horn 123.980 11 200 0 Running
4 11 18 United States Emil Andres 121.139 20 200 0 Running
5 12 24 United States Joie Chitwood 119.816 28 200 0 Running
6 6 33 United States Louis Durant (R) 118.973 31 200 0 Running
7 28 52 Italy Luigi Villoresi (R) 121.249 18 200 0 Running
8 29 7 United States Frank Wearne 121.233 19 197 0 Flagged
9 25 39 United States Bill Sheffler (R) 120.611 23 139 0 Flagged
10 31 17 United States Billy Devore 119.876 27 167 0 Throttle
11 27 4 United States Mel Hansen 121.431 17 143 0 Crankshaft
12 10 25 United States Russ Snowberger 121.593 15 134 0 Differential
13 18 14 United States Harry McQuinn 124.499 9 124 0 Out of oil
14 19 2 United States Ralph Hepburn 133.944 1 121 44 Stalled
15 13 12 United States Al Putnam 116.283 33 120 0 Magneto
16 1 3 United States Cliff Bergere 126.471 3 82 2 Out of oil
17 8 45 United States Duke Dinsmore (R) 123.279 12 82 0 Rod
18 17 5 United States Chet Miller 124.649 8 64 0 Oil line
19 16 63 United States Jimmy Wilburn (R) 125.113 6 52 0 Engine
20 26 42 United States Tony Bettenhausen (R) 123.094 13 47 0 Rod
21 33 59 United States Danny Kladis (R) 118.890 32 46 0 Towed
22 32 54 United States Duke Nalon 119.682 29 45 0 Universal joint
23 9 8 United States Mauri Rose 124.065 10 40 8 Crash T3
24 30 38 United States George Connor 120.006 26 38 0 Piston
25 23 48 Canada Hal Robson (R) 121.466 16 37 0 Rod
26 22 15 United States Louis Tomei 119.193 30 34 0 Oil line
27 21 31 United States Henry Banks 120.220 25 32 0 Pinion shaft
28 20 64 United States Shorty Cantlon 122.432 14 28 0 Clutch
29 24 26 United States George Barringer 120.628 22 27 0 Gears
30 14 1 United States Rex Mays 128.861 2 26 3 Manifold
31 3 32 United States Sam Hanks 124.762 7 18 0 Oil line
32 4 47 United States Hal Cole (R) 120.728 21 16 0 Fuel leak
33 2 10 United States Paul Russo 126.183 4 16 0 Crash T3
[6]

Alternates[edit]

Broadcasting[edit]

Radio[edit]

The race was carried live on the Mutual Broadcasting System, the precursor to the IMS Radio Network. The broadcast was sponsored by Perfect Circle Piston Rings and Bill Slater served as the anchor. The broadcast feature live coverage of the start, the finish, and live updates throughout the race.

Mutual Broadcasting System
Booth Announcers Turn Reporters Pit/garage reporters

Booth Announcer: Bill Slater
Analyst: Norman Perry
Commercials: Rand McFarland

South turns: E.Z. Gwynn
Mainstretch: Carl Page
North turns: Jim Shelton

Gene Kelly

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

Works cited[edit]

  • 1946 Indianapolis 500 Radio Broadcast, Mutual: Re-broadcast on "The All-Night Race Party" - WFNI (May 28, 2011)

References[edit]


1941 Indianapolis 500
Mauri Rose
Floyd Davis
1946 Indianapolis 500
George Robson
1947 Indianapolis 500
Mauri Rose