1949 Indianapolis 500

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33rd Indianapolis 500
Indy500winningcar1949.JPG
Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis 500
Sanctioning body AAA
Date May 30, 1949
Winner Bill Holland
Winning Entrant Lou Moore
Average speed 121.327 mph (195.257 km/h)
Pole position Duke Nalon
Pole speed 132.939 mph (213.945 km/h)
Most laps led Bill Holland (146)
Pre-race
Pace car Oldsmobile 88
Pace car driver Wilbur Shaw
Chronology
Previous Next
1948 1950

The 1949 International 500-Mile Sweepstakes Race was the 33rd running of the Indianapolis 500. It was held at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Monday, May 30, 1949.

After two years of failures to his teammate, Bill Holland finally wins one for himself, giving Lou Moore his third consecutive victory. Mauri Rose is fired by the team after the race when he again ignores orders and tries to pass Holland, only to see his car fail with 8 laps to go.

Results[edit]

Finish Start No Name Qual Rank Laps Led Status
1 4 7 United States Bill Holland 128.673 9 200 146 Running
2 12 12 United States Johnnie Parsons (R) 132.900 2 200 0 Running
3 6 22 United States George Connor 128.228 13 200 0 Running
4 13 2 United States Myron Fohr (R) 129.776 3 200 0 Running
5 16 77 United States Joie Chitwood 126.863 27 200 0 Running
6 7 61 United States Jimmy Jackson 128.023 15 200 0 Running
7 9 98 United States Johnny Mantz 127.786 18 200 0 Running
8 19 19 United States Paul Russo 129.487 5 200 0 Running
9 32 9 United States Emil Andres
(Relieved by Walt Brown)
126.042 31 197 0 Flagged
10 24 71 United States Norm Houser (R) 127.756 20 181 0 Flagged
11 21 68 United States Jim Rathmann (R) 126.516 29 175 0 Flagged
12 18 64 United States Troy Ruttman (R) 125.945 32 151 0 Flagged
13 10 3 United States Mauri Rose (W) 127.759 19 192 0 Magneto strap
14 5 17 United States Duane Carter 128.233 12 182 0 Spun T3
15 15 29 United States Duke Dinsmore 127.750 21 174 0 Radius rod
16 14 8 United States Mack Hellings 128.260 11 172 0 Valve
17 22 4 United States Bill Sheffler 128.521 10 160 0 Rod
18 28 32 United States Johnny McDowell (R) 126.139 30 142 0 Magneto
19 11 14 United States Hal Cole 127.168 24 117 0 Rod bearing
20 25 38 United States George Fonder (R)
(Relieved by Mel Hansen)
127.289 22 116 0 Valve
21 30 74 United States Bill Cantrell 127.191 23 95 0 Drive shaft
22 17 57 United States Jackie Holmes (R) 128.087 14 65 0 Drive shaft
23 20 6 United States Lee Wallard 128.912 7 55 19 Gears
24 29 69 United States Bayliss Levrett (R) 129.236 6 52 0 Drain plug
25 2 5 United States Rex Mays 129.552 4 48 12 Engine
26 3 33 United States Jack McGrath 128.884 8 39 0 Oil pump
27 31 15 United States Fred Agabashian 127.007 25 38 0 Overheating
28 33 52 United States Manny Ayulo (R) 125.799 33 24 0 Rod
29 1 54 United States Duke Nalon 132.939 1 23 23 Crash T3
30 23 18 United States Sam Hanks 127.809 17 20 0 Oil leak
31 27 10 Belgium Charles Van Acker 126.524 28 10 0 Crash T4
32 8 26 United States George Lynch (R) 127.823 16 1 0 Crash T1
33 26 37 United States Spider Webb 127.002 26 0 0 Transmission
[1]

Alternates[edit]

Broadcasting[edit]

Radio[edit]

The race was carried live on the Mutual Broadcasting System, the precursor to the IMS Radio Network. The broadcast was sponsored by Perfect Circle Piston Rings and Bill Slater served as the anchor. The broadcast feature live coverage of the start, the finish, and live updates throughout the race.

Mutual Broadcasting System
Booth Announcers Turn Reporters Roving reporters

Booth Announcer: Bill Slater
Analyst: Gordon Graham

South turns: Sid Collins
Backstretch: Gene Kelly
North turns: Jim Shelton

Barry Lake

Television[edit]

The race was carried live for the first time in history on local television on WFBM-TV channel 6 of Indianapolis. The station signed on for the first time race morning May 30, 1949, with a documentary about the race entitled The Crucible of Speed, the covered the race itself. The race broadcast utilized three cameras located along the mainstrech. Earl Townsend, Jr. who had worked previously as a radio reporter, was the first television announcer. Dick Pittenger and Paul Roberts joined Townsend along with engineer Robert Robbins. The telecast reached approximately 3,000 local households.

WFBM-TV Television
Play-by-play Pit reporters

Announcer: Earl Townsend, Jr.
Color: Dick Pittenger
Color: Paul Roberts

Robert Robbins

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

Works cited[edit]

  • 1949 Indianapolis 500 Radio Broadcast, Mutual: Re-broadcast on "The All-Night Race Party" – WIBC-AM (May 28, 2005)
  • Van Camp's Pork & Beans Presents: Great Moments From the Indy 500 – Fleetwood Sounds, 1975

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Indianapolis 500 1949". Ultimate Racing History. Archived from the original on 16 January 2012. Retrieved 16 January 2012. 
  2. ^ The Talk of Gasoline Alley1070-AM WIBC, May 14, 2004


1948 Indianapolis 500
Mauri Rose
1949 Indianapolis 500
Bill Holland
1950 Indianapolis 500
Johnnie Parsons
Preceded by
119.814 mph
(1948 Indianapolis 500)
Record for the fastest average speed
121.327
mph
Succeeded by
124.002 mph
(1950 Indianapolis 500)