1951 Pan American Games

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I Pan American Games
Pan am 1951.jpg
Official logo of the
Buenos Aires 1951 Pan American Games.
Host city Buenos Aires
Country Argentina
Nations participating 21
Athletes participating 2513
Events 140 in 17 sports
Opening ceremony February 25
Closing ceremony March 9
Officially opened by Juan Domingo Perón
Main venue River Plate Stadium

The 1951 Pan American Games (the I Pan American Games) were held in Buenos Aires, Argentina between 25 February-9 March 1951. The Pan American Games' origins were at the Games of the X Olympiad in Los Angeles, United States, where officials representing the National Olympic Committees of the Americas discussed the staging of an Olympic-style regional athletic competition for the athletes of the Americas.[1]

During the Pan American Exposition at Dallas in 1937, a limited sports program was staged. These included Athletics, Boxing, and Wrestling among others. This program was considered a success and a meeting of Olympic officials from the Americas was held.

At the Pan American Sports Conference held in 1940, It was decided to hold the 1st Pan American Games at Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1942. The Pan American Sports Committee was formed to govern the games. Avery Brundage, President of the USOC and Vice-President of the IOC, was elected as the first President. However, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor brought much of the Americas into World War II, thus forcing the cancellation of the 1942 games.

A second conference was held in 1948. Avery Brundage was re-elected as the President of the PASC. It was decided that Buenos Aires would still host the 1st Pan American Games, this time in 1951.

Medal count[edit]

1 Host nation

To sort this table by nation, total medal count, or any other column, click on the icon next to the column title.

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Argentina (ARG) 1 a 68 44/47 38/39 150/154
2  United States (USA) a 44/46 33 18/19 95/98
3  Chile (CHI) a 9/8 20/19 12 41/39
4  Cuba (CUB) 9 9 10 28
5  Brazil (BRA) 5 15 12 32
Note

^ The medal counts for Argentina, the United States and Chile are disputed.

Sports[edit]

References[edit]