1951 Tennessee Volunteers football team

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1951 Tennessee Volunteers football
National Champions
SEC Co-Champions
Sugar Bowl, L 28–13 vs. Maryland
Conference Southeastern Conference
Ranking
Coaches #1
AP #1
1951 record 10–1 (5–0 SEC)
Head coach Robert Neyland
Offensive scheme Single-wing
Base defense Multiple
Home stadium Shields-Watkins Field
Seasons
« 1950 1952 »
1951 SEC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#5 Georgia Tech § 7 0 0     11 0 1
#1 Tennessee § 5 0 0     10 1 0
LSU 4 2 1     7 3 1
Ole Miss 4 2 1     6 3 1
#15 Kentucky 3 3 0     8 4 0
Auburn 3 4 0     5 5 0
Vanderbilt 3 5 0     6 5 0
Alabama 3 5 0     5 6 0
Florida 2 4 0     5 5 0
Georgia 2 4 0     5 5 0
Mississippi State 2 5 0     4 5 0
Tulane 1 5 0     4 6 0
† – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1951 Tennessee Volunteers football team represented the University of Tennessee in the 1951 season. In his next to last season as head coach, Robert Neyland led the Vols to their second consecutive national title and the fourth during his tenure. The 1951 title was also the first undisputed, at the time, national title in school history. Maryland has since been retroactively credited with the 1951 national championship by several selectors, including analyst Jeff Sagarin, as they went undefeated that year and beat Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl. At the time, the AP awarded the title before the bowl games were played. 1951 was also Neyland's ninth undefeated regular season in his career. The 1950 Tennessee team had gone 11–1, winning its last nine games and capping the season off with a victory over Texas in the Cotton Bowl. In 1951, The Vols put together a 10–0 regular season and were voted national champs by the AP Poll before the bowl season began, as was the convention at the time. The game against Alabama on the Third Saturday in October that season was the first ever nationally televised game for both teams. The Vols were a dominant team in the regular season, winning their first nine games by a combined score of 338 to 61 before thwarting a spirited effort by in-state rival Vanderbilt in the last game of the regular season, 35–27.

Prominent players[edit]

The 1951 Tennessee Volunteers featured Hank Lauricella, that season's Heisman Trophy runner up, and Doug Atkins, a future member of both the College Football Hall of Fame and the Pro Football Hall of Fame. James Haslam Jr., a future business and civic leader in Knoxville, was a captain on the 1952 team, and a prominent member of the 1951 squad. The team featured six all-conference players: Lauricella, Atkins, Ted Daffer, John Michaels, Bill Pearman, and Bert Rechichar. Laricella, Daffer, and Pearman were also named All-Americans following the year.

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 29 Mississippi State #1 Shields-Watkins FieldKnoxville, TN W 14–0    
October 6 #16 Duke* #3 Shields-Watkins Field • Knoxville, TN W 26–0    
October 13 Chattanooga* #3 Shields-Watkins Field • Knoxville, TN W 42–13    
October 20 at Alabama #2 Legion FieldBirmingham, AL (Third Saturday in October) CBS W 27–13    
October 27 Tennessee Tech* #1 Shields-Watkins Field • Knoxville, TN W 68–0    
November 3 at North Carolina* #1 Kenan Memorial StadiumChapel Hill, NC W 27–0    
November 10 Washington & Lee* #1 Shields-Watkins Field • Knoxville, TN W 60–14    
November 17 at Ole Miss #2 Hemingway StadiumOxford, MS W 46–21    
November 24 at #9 Kentucky #1 McLean StadiumLexington, KY (Battle for the Barrel) W 28–0    
December 1 Vanderbiltdagger #1 Shields-Watkins Field • Knoxville, TN (Rivalry) W 35–27    
January 1, 1952 vs. #3 Maryland* #1 Tulane StadiumNew Orleans, LA (Sugar Bowl) L 13–28    
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll.
  • Reference:[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 2011 Tennessee Football Record Book. Knoxville, Tennessee: University of Tennessee Athletics Media Relations Office. 2011. p. 122.