1956 in baseball

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The following are the baseball events of the year 1956 throughout the world.  

Champions[edit]

Major League Baseball[edit]

Other champions[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

Major League Baseball statistical leaders[edit]

American League National League
AVG Mickey Mantle1 NYY .353 Hank Aaron MLB .324
HR Mickey Mantle1 NYY 52 Duke Snider BRO 43
RBI Mickey Mantle1 NYY 130 Stan Musial STL 109
Wins Frank Lary DET 21 Don Newcombe BRO 27
ERA Whitey Ford NYY 2.47   Lew Burdette MLB 2.70  
Ks Herb Score CLE 263 Sam Jones CHC 176

1 Major League Triple Crown Batting Winner

Major league baseball final standings[edit]

American League final standings[edit]

American League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
New York Yankees 97 57 .630 --
Cleveland Indians 88 66 .571 9
Chicago White Sox 85 69 .552 12
Boston Red Sox 84 70 .545 13
Detroit Tigers 82 72 .532 15
Baltimore Orioles 69 85 .448 28
Washington Senators 59 95 .383 38
Kansas City Athletics 52 102 .338 45

National League final standings[edit]

National League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Brooklyn Dodgers 93 61 .604 --
Milwaukee Braves 92 62 .597 1
Cincinnati Reds 91 63 .591 2
St. Louis Cardinals 76 78 .494 17
Philadelphia Phillies 71 83 .461 22
New York Giants 67 87 .435 26
Pittsburgh Pirates 66 88 .429 27
Chicago Cubs 60 94 .390 33

Events[edit]

January–March[edit]

  • February 6 - Supporting the Wagner-Cashmore plan to build a $30-million downtown Brooklyn sports center, Brooklyn Dodgers owner Walter O'Malley promises to buy four million dollars worth of bonds.

April–June[edit]

  • May 26 - Al Simmons died in Milwaukee, at the age of 54. A former Philadelphia Athletics outfielder as well as a three-time All-Star and two-time champion bat, Simmons posted a .334 average with 307 home runs and 1827 RBI in a 20-season major league career that included stints with six other teams besides the Athletics. Simmons was enshrined into the Hall of Fame in 1953.
  • May 30 - Mickey Mantle of the New York Yankees narrowly misses hitting the first home run ever hit completely out of Yankee Stadium. With Hank Bauer and Gil McDougald on base in the fifth inning of Game One of a doubleheader against the Washington Senators, Mantle, batting left-handed against Pedro Ramos, hits a towering drive above the level of the stadium roof. However, a stiff wind cuts down the ball, which strikes the right-field facade, 18 inches (460 mm) above the level of the roof. The home run gives the Yankees a 3-1 lead; they go on to win 4-3.

July–September[edit]

October–December[edit]

  • October 9 - The Dodgers bounce back. Brooklyn's Clem Labine comes out of the bullpen to pitch a 1-0 victory for the Dodgers in Game 6 of the World Series. Yankee Enos Slaughter misjudges Jackie Robinson's fly ball, and Jim Gilliam scores from second base; it turned out to be Robinson's last major league hit. The series is tied at 3 games apiece.
  • November 27:
    • Don Newcombe, who posted a 27-7 record with 139 strikeouts and a 3.06 ERA for the National League pennant-winning Brooklyn Dodgers, becomes the first MLB Cy Young Award winner. Only one pitcher will be selected each season for this prestigious pitching award until 1967, when each league will name a winner.
    • Outfielder Charlie Peete, given a good shot at being the first black starter on the St. Louis Cardinals, is killed in a plane crash in Caracas, Venezuela. Peete, who hit .192 in 23 games for St. Louis in 1956, was returning from playing winter ball.

Births[edit]

January–February[edit]

March–April[edit]

May–June[edit]

July–August[edit]

September–October[edit]

November–December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

  • January 4 - John Beckwith, 55, star infielder of the Negro Leagues
  • January 10 - Algie McBride, 86, outfielder for the Chicago Colts, Cincinnati Reds, and New York Giants from 1896 to 1901.
  • January 23 - Billy Evans, 71, American League umpire from 1906 to 1927, later the general manager of the Indians and Tigers
  • January 31 - Buck Weaver, 65, one of the eight Chicago White Sox players suspended for life in the Black Sox scandal
  • February 8 - Long Tom Hughes, 77, pitcher for the Chicago Orphans at the turn of the 20th century and one of the first World Series pitchers ever, in 1903, with the Boston Americans
  • February 8 - Connie Mack, 93, Hall of Fame manager of the Philadelphia Athletics from 1901 to 1950, retiring with a record 3,731 victories
  • February 25 - Jack Lewis, 72, second baseman for the Boston Red Sox and Pittsburgh Rebels between 1911 and 1915
  • April 18 - John Heydler, 86, National League president from 1918 to 1934
  • May 6 - Harry Ostdiek, 75, catcher who played for the Cleveland Naps (1904) and Boston Red Sox (1908)
  • May 26 - Al Simmons, 54, Hall of Fame outfielder who batted a career .334 and was named the AL's MVP in 1929 by The Sporting News
  • June 2 - Denny Sullivan, 73, center fielder for the Washington Senators, Boston Red Sox/Americans and Cleveland Naps between 1905 and 1909
  • September 22 - Jesse Tannehill, 82, 6-time winner of 20 games with the Pittsburgh Pirates and Boston Red Sox
  • October 13 - George Dumont, 60, pitcher for the Washington Senators and Boston Red Sox between 1915 and 1919
  • October 30 - Dick Midkiff, 42, pitcher for the 1938 Boston Red Sox
  • November 22 - Roy Carlyle, 55, outfielder for the Washington Senators, Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees in the 1920s
  • November 27 – Charlie Peete, 27, St. Louis Cardinals outfielder, in a plane crash in Venezuela while playing winter baseball
  • November 30 - John Shea, 59, pitcher for the 1928 Boston Red Sox
  • December 27 - Hob Hiller, 63, infielder for the Boston Red Sox in the early 1920s