1964–65 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team

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1964-65 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball
A blue block M with maize-colored borders and the word Michigan across the middle.
Big Ten Conference Champion
Conference Big Ten Conference
Ranking
Coaches #1
AP #1
1964-65 record 24-4 (13-1 Big Ten)
Head coach Dave Strack
Assistant coach James Skala
Assistant coach Tom Jorgensen (Freshman coach)
MVP Cazzie Russell
MVP Bill Buntin}
Captain Larry Tregoning
Home arena Fielding H. Yost Field House
Seasons
« 1963-64 1965–66 »
1964–65 Big Ten Conference men's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
#1 Michigan 13 1   .929     24 4   .857
#7 Minnesota 11 3   .786     19 5   .792
Illinois 10 4   .714     18 6   .750
Indiana 9 5   .643     19 5   .792
Iowa 8 6   .571     14 10   .583
Ohio State 6 3   .667     12 12   .500
Purdue 5 9   .357     12 12   .500
Wisconsin 4 10   .286     9 13   .409
Northwestern 3 11   .214     7 17   .292
Michigan State 1 13   .071     5 18   .217
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1964–65 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team represented the University of Michigan in intercollegiate college basketball during the 1964–65 season. The team played its home games at Fielding H. Yost Field House (renamed Yost Ice Arena in 1973) on the school's campus in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Under the direction of head coach Dave Strack, the team won the Big Ten Conference Championship.[1][2]

Season review[edit]

This was the second of three consecutive Big Ten titles and Michigan's second visit to the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament final four.[2][3] The team earned the Big Ten team statistical championships for both scoring offense (92.9) and scoring margin (12.2).[4] Junior Cazzie Russell averaged 25.7 points per game and senior Bill Buntin added 20.1.[2] The team spent the entire 15-week season ranked in the Associated Press Top Ten Poll, starting and ending the season ranked number one and holding that position in ten of the fifteen weeks of the poll.[5] The team also finished the season ranked number one in the final UPI Coaches' Poll.[6] Larry Tregoning served as team captain, while Russell and Buntin shared team MVP.[7]

The team was the first Michigan team to defeat the number one ranked team in the country when it beat Wichita State on December 14 by an 87–85 margin. As of 2010 only two Michigan teams have done so.[8] On March 20, 1965, Oliver Darden went 11 for 11 in free throw attempts against UCLA, which was a school single-game record for most without a miss until Craig Dill made 12 on February 18, 1966.[9]

Post season[edit]

In the 23-team 1965 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, Michigan improved upon its 1964 tournament final four appearance by reaching the championship game against the UCLA Bruins where it lost 91–80. As it had the year before the team had an opening round bye. Then it defeated the Dayton Flyers 98–71 and the Vanderbilt Commodores 87–85 to win the Mideast region. In the final four, the team defeated the Bill Bradley-led Princeton Tigers team 93–76 bowing to UCLA.[3] In the championship game, Michigan had three players disqualified, which was an NCAA tournament championship game record that stood until March 31, 1997.[10][11][12] The season marked John Wooden's second consecutive championship as UCLA coach and the second of what would become nine championships in ten seasons.[13]

NCAA tournament summary[edit]

  • Mideast
    • Michigan 98, Dayton 71
    • Michigan 87, Vanderbilt 85
  • Final Four
    • Michigan 93, Princeton 76
    • UCLA 91, Michigan 80

[14]

Accomplishments[edit]

Various members of the team earned significant recognitions: Strack earned the UPI College Basketball Coach of the Year.[2] Russell won the Chicago Tribune Silver Basketball as Big Ten MVP.[2][15] Russell and Buntin were both 1965 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans.[16] Following the season Bill Buntin became the first Wolverine selected in the NBA Draft.[2]

That season, Buntin surpassed John Tidwell and established the Michigan career scoring record with 1725 and a 21.8 average, but Russell would end his career the following year with superior numbers.[17] Russell eclipsed his own single-season point total record of 670 with a total of 694 ( a number he would surpass the following season).[17] Buntin also surpassed, M. C. Burton, Jr.'s 1957–59 career rebound total of 831 and average of 12.59 with 1037 and 13.13, but Rudy Tomjanovich would set the current standards by surpassing both of these in 1970.[18] However, Buntin's total of 58 career point-rebound double doubles remains a Michigan record.[19] While Russell eclipsed Buntin's single-season school free throw record of 151 by one, Buntin set the school's career total record of 385, but both of these marks would be eclipsed by Russell the following season.[9] The team continues to hold the single-season Big Ten Conference rebounding record with 1521, a total that was tied by the national champion 2000 Michigan State Spartans[20] The team set the single-season team points per game Big Ten Conference record with 92.9 (1,300 in 14 conference games). The record would be broken the following season by the Wolverines.[21] The team set the school single-season free throws made record of 494, which would last until 1977.[22] On December 1, 1964, the team began a 17-game home winning streak against the Ball State that continued through a January 29, 1966 victory over Wisconsin. This surpassed the 16-game streak from February 22, 1947 – February 7, 1949 and stood as the longest home winning streak in school history until a 22-game streak that started on January 12, 1976.[23]

Statistics[edit]

The team posted the following statistics:[24]

Name GP GS Min Avg FG FGA FG% 3FG 3FGA 3FG% FT FTA FT% OR DR RB Avg Ast Avg PF DQ TO Stl Blk Pts Avg
Cazzie Russell 27 27 271 558 0.486 -- -- 152 186 0.817 208 7.7 66 3 694 25.7
Bill Buntin 28 28 221 454 0.487 -- -- 122 159 0.767 323 11.5 87 8 564 20.1
Oliver Darden 28 25 152 322 0.472 -- -- 59 95 0.621 246 8.8 88 4 363 13.0
Larry Tregoning 28 28 133 292 0.455 -- -- 44 63 0.698 211 7.5 73 2 310 11.1
George Pomey 28 20 86 194 0.443 -- -- 37 57 0.649 104 3.7 59 0 209 7.5
John Thompson 23 11 52 119 0.437 -- -- 18 25 0.720 29 1.3 43 0 122 5.3
Jim Myers 26 0 44 140 0.314 -- -- 14 23 0.609 117 4.5 35 0 102 3.9
Craig Dill 20 0 32 66 0.485 -- -- 30 42 0.714 54 2.7 27 0 94 4.7
John Clawson 16 0 22 48 0.458 -- -- 6 11 0.545 23 1.4 21 1 50 3.1
Tom Ludwig 11 0 5 17 0.294 -- -- 4 4 1.000 7 0.6 9 0 14 1.3
Dennis Bankey 7 0 0 6 0.000 -- -- 5 6 0.833 5 0.7 5 0 5 0.7
Dan Brown 6 0 1 7 0.143 -- -- 1 3 0.333 8 1.3 6 0 3 0.5
Van Tillotson 3 0 0 1 0.000 -- -- 2 5 0.400 4 1.3 2 0 2 0.7
TEAM 28 173 6.2 26
Charles Adams 1 0 0 1 0.000 -- -- 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0.0
Season Total 28 1019 2225 0.458 494 679 0.728 1512 54.0 521 18 2532 90.4
Opponents 28 876 1979 0.443 -- -- 448 651 0.688 1156 41.3 514 20 2200 78.6

Rankings[edit]

Ranking movements
Legend: ██ Increase in ranking. ██ Decrease in ranking.
NR = Not ranked. RV = Received votes. ( ) = First place votes.
Week
Poll Pre 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Final 
AP Poll[5] 1 1 2 1 1 3 2 2 2 6 6 6 6 6 6


Team players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Five players from this team were selected in the NBA Draft.[25][26][27]

Year Round Pick Overall Player NBA Club
1965 1 Territorial 2 Bill Buntin Detroit Pistons
1965 15 3 103 George Pomey St. Louis Hawks
1966 1 1 1 Cazzie Russell New York Knicks
1966 3 2 22 Oliver Darden Detroit Pistons
1967 4 11 42 Craig Dill San Diego Rockets

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 54. Retrieved 2010-09-02. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f 2007-08 Men's Basketball Media Guide. University of Michigan. 2007. p. 11. 
  3. ^ a b "The Final Four". National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 8. Retrieved 2010-08-29. 
  4. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 36. Retrieved 2010-09-03. 
  5. ^ a b "Division I Records". National Collegiate Athletic Association. pp. 68–83. Retrieved 2010-08-28. 
  6. ^ "Division I Records". National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 85. Retrieved 2010-08-28. 
  7. ^ "All-Time Accolades". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. pp. 9–10. 
  8. ^ "Division I Records". National Collegiate Athletic Association. pp. 63–66. Retrieved 2010-08-28. 
  9. ^ a b 2007-08 Men's Basketball Media Guide. University of Michigan. 2007. p. 174. 
  10. ^ "The Final Four". National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 13. Retrieved 2010-08-29. 
  11. ^ "1965 Men's College Basketball Bracket". CBS Sports. Retrieved 2010-09-04. 
  12. ^ "1965 NCAA Basketball Tournament Bracket". databaseSports.com. Retrieved 2010-09-04. 
  13. ^ "Division I Championship". National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 3. Retrieved 2010-08-29. 
  14. ^ http://www.databasesports.com/ncaab/tourney.htm?yr=1965
  15. ^ "College headlines". Chicago Tribune. 
  16. ^ "All-Time Accolades". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. pp. 4–7. 
  17. ^ a b 2007-08 Men's Basketball Media Guide. University of Michigan. 2007. p. 162. 
  18. ^ 2007-08 Men's Basketball Media Guide. University of Michigan. 2007. p. 166. 
  19. ^ 2007-08 Men's Basketball Media Guide. University of Michigan. 2007. p. 169. 
  20. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 29. Retrieved 2010-09-02. 
  21. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 31. Retrieved 2010-09-02. 
  22. ^ "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 14. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  23. ^ "Through The Years". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 7. Retrieved 2010-09-10. 
  24. ^ "Men's Basketball Statistic Archive Query Page". CBS Interactive. Retrieved 2010-03-28. 
  25. ^ "1965 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  26. ^ "1966 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  27. ^ "1967 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25.