1964–65 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team

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1964–65 Princeton Tigers men's basketball
Ivy League Champion
Conference Ivy League
1964–65 record 23–6 (13–1, 1st Ivy League)
Head coach Butch van Breda Kolff
Captain Bill Bradley
Home arena Dillon Gymnasium
Seasons
« 1963–64 1965–66 »

The 1964–65 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team represented Princeton University in intercollegiate college basketball during the 1964–65 NCAA University Division men's basketball season. Butch van Breda Kolff served as head coach and the team captain was Bill Bradley.[1] The team played its home games in the Dillon Gymnasium in Princeton, New Jersey.[2] The team was the champion of the Ivy League, earning an invitation to the 23-team 1965 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament.[3]

The team posted a 23–6 overall record and a 13–1 conference record.[1] The team won its NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament East region first round contest against the Penn State Nittany Lions by an 60–58 margin at The Palestra on March 8, 1965. Then in the East Regional at Cole Field House in College Park, Maryland the team defeated NC State 66–48 on March 12 and Providence 109–69 on March 13. Then on March 19 in the national semifinal at the Memorial Coliseum Portland, Oregon the team was defeated by the Cazzie Russell-led Michigan Wolverines 93–76 before beating the Wichita State Shockers 118–82 the following night.[1][3][4] Bill Bradley earned the NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player award.[5]

Bradley, who for third consecutive season led the conference in scoring with a 28.8 points per game average in conference games, was a first team All-Ivy League selection. In addition, Bradley was a repeat consensus first team 1965 NCAA Men's Basketball All-American selection by numerous panels: First team (Associated Press, United Press International, National Association of Basketball Coaches, United States Basketball Writers Association, Sporting News, Converse, NEA, Helms Foundation). Bradley also won a Rhodes Scholarship and was a territorial first round selection in the 1965 NBA Draft by the New York Knicks.[6] Bradley surpassed Arthur Loeb (1921–22 and 1922–23) and Cyril Haas (1915–16 and 1916–17) as the school's only three-time men's basketball All-American selection.[3][7] Over the course of the season, Bradley won the national statistical championship for free throw percentage (88.6%, 273–308).[8]

As a result of his performance against Witchita State in the final four, Bradley holds the following NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament records: single-game points scored in a final four (58),[9][10] single-game field goals made in a final four (22),[10] single-year two-game points scored in a final four (87),[11] and single-year two-game field goals made in a final four (34).[11] Additionally, Bradley formerly held the final four single-game free throw percentage record of 93.3% (minimum 10 made, 14–15), which was broken on March 23, 1972 and single-year two-game free throw percentage record 95.0% (minimum 12 made, 19–20), which was broken in 1972.[10][11]

The team's performance against Witchita State established the current final four victory margin record (36) and the final four single-team single-half points scored record (65, tied).[12][13] The team's performance formerly held two other final four records: single-half two-team points scored (108, broken March 25, 1972) and single-year two-game field goals made (78, broken in 1977).[11][13]

Bradley continues to hold the single-game, single-season, and career total and average points Ivy League records. In addition, he holds the Ivy records for single-game, single-season, and career field goals made as well as single-season, and career free throws made. His career points, career average, career field goals achieved in 1965 surpassed Tony Lavelli (1949), Chet Forte (1957) and Ernie Beck (1953), respectively. His single-game points record surpassed Lavelli's 52 set on February 26, 1949.[14] His 1965 career 87.6% free throw percentage, which surpassed Gus Broberg's 1941 mark of 85.8%, stood as the Ivy League record until it was eclipsed by Joe Hieser in 1968.[15]

Regular season[edit]

The team posted a 23–6 (13–1 Ivy League) record.[16]

LAFAYETTE W 83–74
Army W 64–60
Villanova L *60–61
COLGATE W 81–53
NAVY W 77–67
Rutgers W 92–79
St. Louis L 71–90
Syracuse ! W 79–69
Michigan ! L 78–80
Cincinnati ! L 69–71
YALE W *57–56
BROWN W 80–58
Columbia W 78–68
Cornell L 69–70
Pennsylvania W 83–72
Brown W 69–49
Yale W 67–62
HARVARD W 76–55
DARTMOUTH W 103–64
Dartmouth W 83–57
Harvard W 82–72
COLUMBIA W 93–60
CORNELL W 107–84
PENNSYLVANIA W 81–71
Penn State @ W 60–58
North Carolina State # W 66–48
Providence # W 109–69
Michigan $ L 76–93
Wichita State $ W 118–82
! = ECAC Holiday Classic at New York
@ = NCAA first round at Philadelphia
# = NCAA East Regional at College Park, Md.
$ = NCAA Final Four at Portland, Ore.

Home games in CAPS

NCAA tournament[edit]

The team advanced to the 1965 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament Final four.[17][18]

3/8/65 in Philadelphia, Pa.: Princeton 60, Penn State 58

East Regional

3/12/65 in College Park, Md.: Princeton 66, N.C. State 48
3/13/65 in College Park, Md.: Princeton 109, Providence 69

Final Four

3/19/65 in Portland, Ore.: Michigan 93, Princeton 76
3/20/65 in Portland, Ore.: Princeton 118, Wichita State 82

Awards and honors[edit]

Team players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Two players from this team were selected in the NBA Draft.[21][22]

Year Round Pick Player NBA Club
1965 1 2 Bill Bradley New York Knicks
1967 6 17 Ed Hummer Boston Celtics

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Men's Basketball Record Book • All-Time Results". Princeton Athletic Communications. September 27, 2010. 
  2. ^ Princeton Athletic Communications (June 12, 2009). "Men's Basketball Record Book • Coaching Record & Program Facts". Princeton University. Retrieved September 28, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c 2009–10 Ivy League Basketball Media Guide. IvyLeagueSports.com. p. 30. 
  4. ^ Princeton Athletic Communications (June 22, 2009). "Men's Basketball Record Book • Men's Basketball in the Postseason". Princeton University. Retrieved September 27, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Final Four Most Outstanding Players". cbs.sportsline.com. Retrieved September 29, 2010. 
  6. ^ 2009–10 Ivy League Basketball Media Guide. IvyLeagueSports.com. p. 31. 
  7. ^ a b Princeton Athletic Communications (June 12, 2009). "Men's Basketball Record Book • Ivy League & National Awards". Princeton University. Retrieved September 29, 2010. 
  8. ^ "Division I Records". National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 35. Retrieved September 29, 2010. 
  9. ^ Princeton Athletic Communications. "1965 NCAA Final Four Team". Princeton University. Retrieved September 29, 2010. 
  10. ^ a b c "The Final Four". National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 9. Retrieved September 29, 2010. 
  11. ^ a b c d "The Final Four". National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 17. Retrieved September 29, 2010. 
  12. ^ "The Final Four". National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 10. Retrieved September 29, 2010. 
  13. ^ a b "The Final Four". National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 11. Retrieved September 29, 2010. 
  14. ^ 2009–10 Ivy League Basketball Media Guide. IvyLeagueSports.com. 
  15. ^ 2009–10 Ivy League Basketball Media Guide. IvyLeagueSports.com. p. 52. 
  16. ^ Princeton Athletic Communications (June 12, 2009). "Men's Basketball Record Book • All-Time Results". Princeton University. Retrieved March 27, 2010. 
  17. ^ "1965 NCAA Basketball Tournament Bracket". databaseSports.com. Retrieved March 27, 2010. 
  18. ^ a b c d e "1964–65 Ivy Men's Basketball". ivyleaguesports.com. Archived from the original on January 31, 2009. Retrieved March 27, 2010. 
  19. ^ "Final Four Most Outstanding Players". cbs.sportsline.com. Retrieved March 27, 2010. 
  20. ^ Princeton Athletic Communications (June 12, 2009). "Men's Basketball Record Book • Ivy League & National Awards". Princeton University. Retrieved March 27, 2010. 
  21. ^ "1965 NBA Draft". databaseSports.com. Retrieved March 27, 2010. 
  22. ^ "1967 NBA Draft". databaseSports.com. Retrieved March 27, 2010.