1964 Philadelphia Phillies season

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1964 Philadelphia Phillies
1964 Philadelphia Phillies team photo.jpg
Team photo of the 1964 Philadelphia Phillies
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) Robert R. M. Carpenter, Jr.
Manager(s) Gene Mauch
Local television WFIL
Local radio WFIL
(By Saam, Bill Campbell, Richie Ashburn)
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The 1964 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 82nd season for the franchise in Philadelphia. After leading the National League during the latter months of the season, the team suffered a drastic collapse during the final two weeks. The Phillies finished in a second-place tie with the Cincinnati Reds. Both posted a record of 92-70, finishing one game behind the NL and World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals, and just two games ahead of fourth-place San Francisco. Gene Mauch managed the Phillies, as they played their home games at Connie Mack Stadium.

Offseason[edit]

Regular season[edit]

Perfect game[edit]

On Father's Day, Jim Bunning threw a perfect game against the Mets, the first in the National League since 1880. For perhaps the only time in the stadium's history, the Shea faithful found themselves rooting for the visitors, caught up in the rare achievement, and roaring for Bunning on every pitch in the ninth inning.[2] His strikeout of John Stephenson for the last out capped the performance.

The "Phold"[edit]

1964 Philadelphia Phillies World Series Tickets. These were sold in early September 1964 to season ticket holders in anticipation of the club winning the National League Pennant. Note this is a complete set for all four home games to be played at Connie Mack Stadium.

From 1919 through 1947, the Phillies finished last a total of 17 times and next to last seven times. A 1962 cartoon in a baseball magazine depicted a ballplayer arriving at a French Foreign Legion outpost, explaining, "I was released by the Phillies!"

During 1962 and 1963, the Phillies began to climb back to respectability, and throughout the 1964 season, they seemed destined to make it to the World Series, with excellent performances from players such as rookie third baseman Dick Allen, starters Jim Bunning (obtained from the Detroit Tigers at the start of the season to shore up the pitching staff) and Chris Short, and star right fielder Johnny Callison. TV Guide went to press with a World Series preview that featured a photo of Connie Mack Stadium. (Through the 1968 season, both first-place teams automatically went to the World Series, the only postseason play of that time.)

The 1964 Philadelphia Phillies held a six and a half game lead in an exceptionally strong National League with 12 games to play. They then lost ten straight games (the first seven played at home) and fell into a second place tie. The skein started with Chico Ruiz stealing home, with Frank Robinson at bat, for the game's only run. Dick Allen said of the play: "The play broke our humps."[3] The crucial series came when the now second-place Phillies traveled to St. Louis to play the Cardinals after their losing home stand. They dropped the first game of the series to Bob Gibson by a 5–1 score, their eighth loss in a row, dropping them to third place. The Cardinals would sweep the three-game set and assume first place for good. The "Phold," as it is known, is one of the most notable collapses in sports history.[4][5][6]

Season standings[edit]

National League W L GB Pct.
St. Louis Cardinals 93 69 -- .574
Cincinnati Reds 92 70 1 .568
Philadelphia Phillies 92 70 1 .568
San Francisco Giants 90 72 3 .556
Milwaukee Braves 88 74 5 .543
Los Angeles Dodgers 80 82 13 .494
Pittsburgh Pirates 80 82 13 .494
Chicago Cubs 76 86 17 .469
Houston Colt .45s 66 96 27 .407
New York Mets 53 109 40 .327

Opening Day lineup[edit]

Number Name Position
8 Tony Taylor Second base
6 Johnny Callison Right field
15 Dick Allen Third base
5 Roy Sievers First base
25 Tony González Center field
10 Danny Cater Left field
11 Clay Dalrymple Catcher
7 Bobby Wine Shortstop
23 Dennis Bennett Pitcher

Notable transactions[edit]

Roster[edit]

1964 Philadelphia Phillies
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Player stats[edit]

= Indicates team leader

Batting[edit]

Starters by position[edit]

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; R = Runs; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted In; SB = Stolen bases

Pos Player G AB R H Avg. HR RBI SB
C Dalrymple, ClayClay Dalrymple 127 382 36 91 .238 6 46 0
1B Herrnstein, JohnJohn Herrnstein 125 303 38 71 .234 6 25 1
2B Taylor, TonyTony Taylor 154 570 62 143 .251 4 46 13
3B Allen, DickDick Allen 162 632 125 201 .318 29 91 3
SS Wine, BobbyBobby Wine 126 283 28 60 .212 4 34 1
LF Covington, WesWes Covington 129 339 37 95 .280 13 58 0
CF González, TonyTony González 131 421 55 117 .278 4 40 0
RF Callison, JohnnyJohnny Callison 162 654 101 179 .274 31 104 6

[10]

Other batters[edit]

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; R = Runs; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted In; SB = Stolen bases

Player G AB R H Avg. HR RBI SB
Rojas, CookieCookie Rojas 109 340 58 99 .291 2 31 1
Amaro, RubénRubén Amaro 129 299 31 79 .264 4 34 1
Triandos, GusGus Triandos 73 188 17 47 .250 8 33 0
Cater, DannyDanny Cater 60 152 13 45 .294 7 26 0
Thomas, FrankFrank Thomas 39 143 20 42 .294 7 26 0
Sievers, RoyRoy Sievers 49 120 7 22 .183 4 16 0
Power, VicVic Power 18 48 1 10 .208 0 3 0

Pitching[edit]

Starting pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Bunning, JimJim Bunning 41 284 19 8 2.63 219
Short, ChrisChris Short 42 221 17 9 2.20 181
Bennett, DennisDennis Bennett 41 208 12 14 3.68 125
Mahaffey, ArtArt Mahaffey 34 157 12 9 4.53 80

Other pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Culp, RayRay Culp 30 135 8 7 4.13 96

Relief pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Baldschun, JackJack Baldschun 71 6 9 21 3.12 96
Boozer, JohnJohn Boozer 22 3 4 2 5.07 51
Duren, RyneRyne Duren 2 0 0 0 6.00 5

Awards and honors[edit]

1964 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

In popular culture[edit]

The '64 Phillies are immortalized in American pop culture via numerous book chapters, magazine articles, and newspaper columns. At least three full length books are devoted to the '64 Phillies: non-fiction books The 1964 Phillies: The Story of Baseball's Most Memorable Collapse by John P. Rossi and September Swoon: Richie Allen, the '64 Phillies, and Racial Integration by William C. Kashatis; and a novel based on the '64 Phillies collapse titled '64 Intruder, by Gregory T. Glading, which centers on a Phillies fan going back in time and preventing Chico Ruiz from stealing home in the "Phold's" first loss.

Farm system[edit]

Level Team League Manager
AAA Arkansas Travelers Pacific Coast League Frank Lucchesi
AA Chattanooga Lookouts Southern League Andy Seminick
A Bakersfield Bears California League Moose Johnson
A Miami Marlins Florida State League Bobby Morgan
A Eugene Emeralds Northwest League Bob Wellman
A Spartanburg Phillies Western Carolinas League Louis Lieberman

[12]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Gus Triandos page at Baseball Reference
  2. ^ White, Gordon S. Jr. (June 22, 1964). "Bunning Pitches a Perfect Game; Mets Are Perfect Victims, 6 to 0". New York Times. p. 1. "The Phils won the contest...before 32,904 fans who were screaming for Bunning during the last two innings...Yesterday's perfect pitching turned the usually loyal Met fans into Bunning fans in the late innings. From the seventh inning on...Bunning had the crowd...behind him." 
  3. ^ Allen, Dick; Whitaker, Tim (1989). Crash: The Life and Times of Dick Allen. Ticknor & Fields. 
  4. ^ Concannon, Mark (September 2, 2011). "Green remembers Phillies' collapse all too well". FSWisconsin. FOX Sports Interactive Media, LLC. Retrieved September 30, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Memorable swoons and surges (2 of 12): 1964 Phillies". FOXSports.com. September 12, 2011 (mis-dated; actually September 30, 2011, the day after Boston Red Sox lost wild card in Game 162). Retrieved September 30, 2011. "In an epic meltdown dubbed "The Phillie Phold" of 1964, Philadelphia saw a 6 1/2-game lead evaporate with 12 games to play." 
  6. ^ "Memorable swoons and surges (1 of 12): 2011 Boston Red Sox". FOXSports.com. September 12, 2011 (mis-dated; actually September 30, 2011, the day after Boston Red Sox lost wild card in Game 162). Retrieved September 30, 2011. "By season's end, the Red Sox had become the first team ever to blow a nine-game lead in September and fail to make the postseason." 
  7. ^ Darrell Sutherland page at Baseball Reference
  8. ^ Joe Lis page at Baseball Reference
  9. ^ Frank Thomas page at Baseball Reference
  10. ^ http://www.baseball-reference.com/teams/PHI/1964.shtml
  11. ^ http://www.baseball-almanac.com/asgbox/yr1964as.shtml
  12. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, N.C.: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

References[edit]

External links[edit]