1965 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

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1965 Alabama Crimson Tide football
AP Poll National Champions
Orange Bowl Champions
SEC Champions
Orange Bowl, W 39–28 vs. Nebraska
Conference Southeastern Conference
Ranking
Coaches #4
AP #1
1965 record 9–1–1 (6–1–1 SEC)
Head coach Bear Bryant
Captain Steve Sloan
Captain Paul Crane
Home stadium Denny Stadium
Legion Field
Ladd Stadium
Seasons
« 1964 1966 »
1965 SEC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#1 Alabama 6 1 1     9 1 1
Auburn 4 1 1     5 5 1
Florida 4 2 0     7 4 0
#7 Tennessee 3 1 2     8 1 2
Ole Miss 5 3 0     7 4 0
#8 LSU 3 3 0     8 3 0
Kentucky 3 3 0     6 4 0
Georgia 3 3 0     6 4 0
Vanderbilt 1 5 0     2 7 1
Tulane 1 5 0     2 8 0
Mississippi State 1 5 0     4 6 0
† – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1965 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1965 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 71st overall and 32nd season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his eighth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished season with nine wins, one loss and one tie (9–1–1 overall, 6–1–1 in the SEC), as SEC champions and with a victory over Nebraska in the Orange Bowl. Alabama was also recognized as national champions by the AP Poll after their Orange Bowl win.

Alabama opened the season ranked No. 5, but were upset by Georgia 18–17 in the first game of the season. They rebounded with their first win of the season over Tulane and followed that with a 17–16 win over Ole Miss in a game in which Alabama had to rally from a nine-point fourth quarter deficit for the victory. The next week, the Crimson Tide defeated Vanderbilt in Nashville before they returned home for their rivalry game against Tennessee. Against the Volunteers, the score was deadlocked 7–7 in the closing seconds, but Alabama had driven to the Tennessee four-yard line. Ken Stabler believing that it was third down, threw the ball out of bounds with six seconds left to stop the clock. However, it was actually fourth down, possession went to Tennessee, and the game ended in a tie.

After the tie, the Crimson Tide won five in a row over Florida State, Mississippi State, LSU, South Carolina and Auburn en route to Bryant's fourth SEC title at Alabama. Because the Associated Press was holding its vote until after the bowl games instead of before for the first time, No. 4 Alabama still had a chance to win the national championship when they played No. 3 Nebraska in the Orange Bowl. On New Year's Day, No. 1 Michigan State lost in the Rose Bowl and No. 2 Arkansas lost in the Cotton Bowl Classic, and Alabama defeated Nebraska 39–28 in the Orange Bowl and captured its third AP National Championship in five years.

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 18 at Georgia #5 Sanford StadiumAthens, GA ABC L 17–18   42,500
September 25 Tulane Ladd StadiumMobile, AL W 27–0   31,920
October 2 Ole Miss Legion FieldBirmingham, AL (Rivalry) W 17–16   65,677
October 9 at Vanderbilt Dudley FieldNashville, TN W 22–7   30,066
October 16 Tennessee Legion Field • Birmingham, AL (Third Saturday in October) T 7–7   65,680
October 23 Florida State*dagger Denny StadiumTuscaloosa, AL W 21–0   43,066
October 30 at Mississippi State #10 Mississippi Veterans Memorial StadiumJackson, MS (Rivalry) W 10–7   45,876
November 6 at LSU #5 Tiger StadiumBaton Rouge, LA (Rivalry) NBC W 31–7   58,953
November 13 South Carolina* #5 Denny Stadium • Tuscaloosa, AL W 35–14   38,776
November 27 vs. Auburn #5 Legion Field • Birmingham, AL (Iron Bowl) W 30–3   66,333
January 1, 1966 vs. #3 Nebraska* #4 Orange Bowl StadiumMiami, FL (Orange Bowl) NBC W 39–28   72,214
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll.
  • Source: Rolltide.com: 1965 Alabama football schedule[1]

Game notes[edit]

Georgia[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
#5 Alabama 0 3 7 7 17
Georgia 0 10 0 8 18
  • Date: September 18
  • Location: Sanford Stadium
    Athens, GA
  • Game attendance: 42,500

To open the 1965 season, the No. 5 Crimson Tide were upset by the Georgia Bulldogs 18–17 at Athens.[2][3][4] After a scoreless first quarter, Georgia took a 10–0 lead on a 37-yard Bob Etter field goal and when George Patton intercepted a Steve Sloan pass and returned it 55-yards for a touchdown in the second quarter. Alabama then made the halftime score 10–3 with a 26-yard David Ray field goal.[2][3] The Crimson Tide then tied the game in the third on an eight-yard Steve Bowman run and took their only lead of the game in the fourth on a two-yard Sloan touchdown run. The Bulldogs then scored their second touchdown late in the fourth quarter when Pat Hodgson lateraled a Kirby Moore pass to Bob Taylor who took it 73-yards for a touchdown. Georgia then successfully made a two-point conversion that gave them an 18–17 victory.[2][3] The loss brought Alabama's all-time record against Georgia to 28–19–4.[5]

Tulane[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Tulane 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 10 7 7 3 27
  • Date: September 25
  • Location: Ladd Stadium
    Mobile, AL
  • Game attendance: 31,920

After their loss to Georgia in the season opener, the Crimson Tide dropped out of the rankings prior to their game against Tulane.[8] At Mobile, the Crimson Tide shutout the Green Wave 27–0 in their annual Ladd Stadium game of the season.[4][6][7] The Crimson Tide took a 10–0 first quarter lead on a 37-yard David Ray field goal followed by a one-yard Leslie Kelley touchdown run, and then extended it to 17–0 at halftime with a 29-yard Steve Sloan touchdown pass to Tommy Tolleson in the second.[6][7] Alabama then closed the game with a 15-yard Sloan touchdown pass to Richard Thompson in the third and a 25-yard Ray field goal in the fourth for the 27–0 win.[6][7] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Tulane to 23–10–3.[9]

Ole Miss[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Ole Miss 3 6 0 7 16
Alabama 0 7 0 10 17
  • Date: October 2
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 65,677

For their third game of the season, Alabama met rival Ole Miss during the regular season for the first time since the 1944 season.[12] In a night game at Legion Field, a nine-yard Steve Sloan touchdown run with just over a minute left in the game gave Alabama a 17–16 victory over the Rebels.[4][10][11] Ole Miss took an early 3–0 lead on a 34-yard Jimmy Keyes field goal in the first quarter and then extended it to 9–0 in the second on an eight-yard James Heidel touchdown pass to Donald Street.[10][11] Sloan then got Alabama on the scoreboard near the end of the second quarter on a five-yard touchdown run that made the halftime score 9–7. After a scoreless third, the Rebels extended their lead to 16–7 on a one-yard Heidel touchdown run before the Crimson Tide rallied for the victory.[10][11]

David Ray scored first with his 37-yard field goal that made the score 16–10 in favor of Ole Miss, and then with 1:19 left in the game Sloan scored the game-tying touchdown on a nine-yard run.[10][11] On the next play, Ray successfully converted the extra point and gave Alabama a 17–16 lead. The Crimson Tide then secured the victory on the next play when the Rebels' Stan Moss fumbled kickoff that was recovered by Alabama who then ran out the clock and won the game.[10][11] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Ole Miss 18–3–2.[13]

Vanderbilt[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 0 0 0 22 22
Vanderbilt 0 7 0 0 7
  • Date: October 9
  • Location: Dudley Field
    Nashville, TN
  • Game attendance: 30,066

After they trailed for the majority of the game, Alabama rallied with 22 fourth quarter points and defeated the Commodores 22–7 at Nashville.[4][14][15] After a scoreless first quarter, the Commodores took a 7–0 lead after Charles Boyd returned a punt 69-yards for a touchdown in the second. Vanderbilt remained in the lead through the fourth quarter when Alabama scored a trio of touchdowns. Steve Bowman scored first on a two-yard run, followed by a 35-yard John Reitz interception return and then on a 57-yard Bowman run late in the game.[14][15] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Vanderbilt to 23–16–4.[16]

Tennessee[edit]

Third Saturday in October
1 2 3 4 Total
Tennessee 0 7 0 0 7
Alabama 0 7 0 0 7
  • Date: October 16
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 65,680

In a game that saw multiple turnovers result in failed touchdown opportunities, Alabama tied the rival Tennessee Volunteers 7–7 at Legion Field.[4][17][18] After a scoreless first quarter, both teams scored their only touchdown in the second. Stan Mitchell scored first for the Vols on a one-yard run and Steve Sloan followed for Alabama with his one-yard run.[17][18] The Crimson Tide had a chance to win the game in the final minute of the game. With only 0:36 remaining in the game, Alabama had possession at the Tennessee six-yard line.[19] However, Alabama quarterback Ken Stabler thought the Tide gained a first down on the previous play and threw the ball out-of-bounds on a fourth down play and turned the ball over on downs back to the Vols. Tennessee then ran out the clock for the tie.[19] The tie brought Alabama's all-time record against Tennessee to 22–19–7.[20]

Florida State[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Florida State 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 7 6 0 8 21
  • Date: October 23
  • Location: Denny Stadium
    Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Game attendance: 43,066

In what was their first all-time game against Florida State, the Crimson Tide shutout the Seminoles 21–0 on homecoming in Tuscaloosa.[21][22][23] Alabama took a 13–0 halftime lead after Leslie Kelley scored on a one-yard touchdown run in the first and Steve Sloan scored on a two-yard touchdown run in the second quarter.[21][22] After a scoreless third, the Crimson Tide closed the game with a second one-yard Kelley touchdown run in the fourth quarter coupled with a Ken Stabler two-point conversion that made the final score 21–0.[21][22]

Mississippi State[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
#10 Alabama 7 0 3 0 10
Mississippi State 0 0 7 0 7
  • Date: October 30
  • Location: Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium
    Jackson, MS
  • Game attendance: 45,876

At the Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium, a pair of Bobby Johns turnovers in the fourth quarter preserved a 10–7 win over the Mississippi State Bulldogs.[4][24][25] The Crimson Tide took an early 7–0 lead after Steve Sloan threw a 65-yard touchdown pass to Dennis Homan in the first quarter. They then extended their lead to 10–0 in the third quarter on a 27-yard David Ray field goal before the Bulldogs scored their only points on an eleven-yard Ashby Cook touchdown pass to Marcus Rhoden later in the quarter.[24][25] In the fourth, Johns preserved the Crimson Tide win with his blocked field goal and interception late in the game.[24][25] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Mississippi State to 37–10–3.[26]

LSU[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
#5 Alabama 7 17 7 0 31
LSU 0 0 0 7 7
  • Date: November 6
  • Location: Tiger Stadium
    Baton Rouge, LA
  • Game attendance: 58,953

After their victory over Mississippi State, Alabama moved into the No. 5 position in the AP Poll prior to their game against LSU.[29] Against the Tigers, the Crimson Tide won 31–7 at Tiger Stadium.[4][27][28] Alabama scored their first touchdown early on a 45-yard Steve Sloan pass to Dennis Homan for a 7–0 first quarter lead.[27][28] 17 second quarter points scored on a two-yard Steve Bowman run, a six-yard Sloan pass to David Ray and a 41-yard Ray field goal made the halftime score 24–0 in favor of the visitors.[27][28] After Bowman scored on a 35-yard run in the third, LSU scored their only points in the fourth on a 53-yard Pat Screen touchdown pass to Joe Labruzzo that made the final score 31–7.[27][28] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against LSU to 17–8–4.[30]

South Carolina[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
South Carolina 0 0 7 7 14
#5 Alabama 7 0 14 14 35
  • Date: November 13
  • Location: Denny Stadium
    Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Game attendance: 38,776

In their second non-conference game of the season, Alabama defeated the South Carolina Gamecocks 35–14 at Denny Stadium.[4][31][32] The Crimson Tide took an early 7–0 lead after Steve Sloan scored on a two-yard touchdown run in the first quarter.[31][32] After they extended their lead on a two-yard Steve Bowman touchdown run, the Gamecocks responded with their first touchdown on a seven-yard Michael L. Fair pass to J. R. Wilburn that made the score 14–7.[31][32] Alabama then scored a pair of touchdowns on Sloan passes to Dennis Homan, the first from 50 and the second from 39 yards. South Carolina answered with a two-yard Phil Branson touchdown run and then Alabama with a two-yard Ken Stabler touchdown run that made the final score 35–14.[31][32] In the game, Sloan eclipsed the previous team records for both pass completions and yardage in a single season formerly held by Joe Namath.[32] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against South Carolina to 5–0.[33]

Auburn[edit]

Iron Bowl
1 2 3 4 Total
Auburn 0 3 0 0 3
#5 Alabama 6 9 8 7 30
  • Date: November 27
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 66,333

In the annual Iron Bowl game, Alabama defeated the Auburn Tigers 30–3 and secured their second consecutive SEC championship.[4][34][35] Alabama took a 15–0 lead late into the second quarter with Steve Sloan touchdown passes of 11-yards to Tommy Tolleson, 33-yards to Ray Perkins and a 27-yard David Ray field goal. Auburn then ended the shutout bid just before halftime on a 44-yard Don Lewis field goal that made the score 15–3.[34][35] The Crimson Tide then closed the game with a two-yard Leslie Kelley touchdown in the third and a 29-yard Sloan touchdown pass to Don Shankles in the fourth that made the final score 30–3.[34][35] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Auburn to 15–14–1.[36]

Nebraska[edit]

Orange Bowl
1 2 3 4 Total
#4 Alabama 7 17 8 7 39
#3 Nebraska 0 7 6 15 28
  • Date: January 1, 1966
  • Location: Orange Bowl Stadium
    Miami, FL
  • Game attendance: 72,214

For the second year in a row, Alabama played in the Orange Bowl. In the 1966 edition of the game, the Crimson Tide defeated the Nebraska Cornhuskers 39–28 and finished the season 9–1–1 and as AP national champions.[37][38]

National championship claim[edit]

The NCAA recognizes consensus national champions as the teams that have captured a championship by way of one of the major polls since the 1950 college football season.[39][40] As they entered the Orange Bowl, the Crimson Tide was ranked fourth by the AP behind Michigan State, Arkansas and Nebraska.[41] After losses by the Spartans an Razorbacks in their bowl game coupled with an Alabama victory over Nebraska in their contest, the Crimson Tide vaulted into the No. 1 position in the final AP poll of the season and won the national championship.[41] Michigan State was also recognized as national champions by various other selectors for the 1965 season, including the UPI.[39]

NFL/AFL Draft[edit]

Several players that were varsity lettermen from the 1965 squad were drafted into the National Football League (NFL) and the American Football League (AFL) between the 1966 and 1968 drafts. These players included the following:

Year Round Overall Player name Position NFL/AFL team
1966 NFL Draft
[42]
11 156 Sloan, SteveSteve Sloan Quarterback Atlanta Falcons
15 216 Tolleson, TomTom Tolleson Wide receiver Atlanta Falcons
15 226 Bowman, SteveSteve Bowman Running back New York Giants
1966 AFL Draft
[43]
17 150 Tolleson, TomTom Tolleson Wide receiver New York Jets
20 179 Bowman, SteveSteve Bowman Halfback Oakland Raiders
1967 NFL Draft
[42]
1 26 Kelley, LeslieLeslie Kelley Running back
Linebacker
New Orleans Saints
4 82 Thompson, LouisLouis Thompson Defensive tackle New York Giants
4 91 Trimble, WayneWayne Trimble Defensive tackle San Francisco 49ers
9 230 Dowdy, CecilCecil Dowdy Linebacker Cleveland Browns
1968 NFL Draft
[42]
1 20 Homan, DennisDennis Homan Wide receiver Dallas Cowboys
2 52 Stabler, KenKen Stabler Quarterback Oakland Raiders
12 320 Johns, BobbyBobby Johns Defensive back Kansas City Chiefs

Freshman squad[edit]

Prior to the 1972 college football season, NCAA rules prohibited freshmen from participating on the varsity team, and as such many schools fielded freshmen teams.[44][45] The Alabama freshmen squad finished the 1965 season with a record of three wins and one loss (3–1).[46] The Baby Tide opened their season with a 7–6 loss at Mississippi State.[47] After a scoreless first quarter, the Bulldogs took a 7–0 lead in the second when Ronnie Coleman thew an 11-yard touchdown pass to Harry Ivey. Although the Alabama defense only allowed State only two first downs for the remainder of the game, the Baby Tide lost 7–6 after a failed two-point conversion attempt that followed a 26-yard Joe Kelley touchdown pass to Donnie Sutton.[47]

Alabama then won their first game of the season at Denny Stadium with a 27–14 victory over Ole Miss.[48] Ole Miss took an early 7–0 lead on a 12-yard Jimmy Wallis touchdown pass to Glenn Cannon. Alabama responded with the next four touchdowns and took a 27–7 lead.[48] Touchdowns were scored on runs of 19-yards by Dave Beddingfield, 25-yards by Mickey Lee, three-yards by Frank Chambers run and on a 61-yard Kelley pass to Conrad Fowler. The Rebels then scored their final points as time expired on a 73-yard Terry Collier touchdown pass to Cannon.[48] In their third game, Alabama defeated Tennessee 19–8 at Neyland Stadium.[49] Alabama took an early 7–0 lead after Donnie Johnston scored on a two-yard touchdown run in the first quarter.[49] After a pair of Myles Prestige field goals, the Baby Tide extended their lead to 19–0 with a second half touchdown. Tennessee responded late with their only touchdown on a four-yard Nick Showalter touchdown run in the fourth quarter.[49]

Two weeks later, Alabama closed the season with a 30–6 victory over rival Auburn at Cliff Hare Stadium.[46] After Baby Tide took a 7–0 first quarter lead on short Frank Chambers run, Auburn scored their only points on a 96-yard return by Larry Ellis on the kickoff that ensued.[46] The Baby Tide then closed the game with 23 unanswered points scored on a one-yard Kelley run, a 20-yard Prestige field goal, a 52-yard Don Matthews punt return and on a nine-yard Johnston reverse.[46]

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ "1965 Alabama football schedule". RollTide.com. University of Alabama Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved May 13, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d Land, Charles (September 19, 1965). "Battling Bulldogs nip Tide, 18–17". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 11. Retrieved May 13, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d Halbrooks, Hap (September 19, 1965). "Bulldogs outfight Tide in 18 to 17 upset win". The Florence Times (Google News Archives). p. 29. Retrieved May 13, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i 1965 Season Recap
  5. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Georgia". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved May 13, 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c d Land, Charles (September 26, 1965). "Tide on its way after 27–0 rout of Tulane". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 9. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c d Atkins, Stan (September 26, 1965). "Tide batters Greenies 27–0". The Florence Times (Google News Archives). Associated Press. p. 29. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  8. ^ Bock, Hal (September 21, 1965). "Notre Dame takes lead in AP Poll". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). Associated Press. p. 5. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  9. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Tulane". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f Meloun, Paul (October 3, 1965). "Tide comes in late, wins 17–16". The Gadsden Times (Google News Archives). p. 17. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f Halbrooks, Hap (October 3, 1965). "Sloan brings Alabama back in another famous scramble". The Florence Times (Google News Archives). p. 11. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  12. ^ Land, Charles (October 2, 1965). "Alabama, Ole Miss battle for big stakes tonight". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 8. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  13. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Mississippi". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  14. ^ a b c "Tide wins 22–7". The Gadsden Times (Google News Archives). Associated Press. October 10, 1965. p. 21. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  15. ^ a b c Kelley, Pete (October 10, 1965). "Another typical Tide win". The Florence Times (Google News Archives). p. 15. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  16. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Vanderbilt". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  17. ^ a b c Land, Charles (October 17, 1965). "Tide, Vols tie". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 9. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  18. ^ a b c Smothers, Jimmy (October 17, 1965). "Tide flows out, Vols happy at 7–7". The Gadsden Times (Google News Archives). p. 21. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  19. ^ a b "Bear takes blame for costly miscue". The Florence Times (Google News Archives). October 17, 1965. p. 15. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  20. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Tennessee". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  21. ^ a b c d Land, Charles (October 24, 1965). "Fighting Tide turns back Seminoles, 21–0". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 13. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  22. ^ a b c d Pollen, Gene (October 24, 1965). "Tide heads off Seminoles at crossroads by 21 to 0". Ocala Star-Banner (Google News Archives). p. 17. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  23. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Florida State". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  24. ^ a b c d "Tide defense kills Bulldogs". The Gadsden Times (Google News Archives). Associated Press. October 31, 1965. p. 21. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  25. ^ a b c d Halbrooks, Hap (October 31, 1965). "Bama defense impresses in 10–7 win over State". The Florence Times (Google News Archives). p. 15. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  26. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Mississippi State". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  27. ^ a b c d e Thomas, Ben (November 7, 1965). "Cagy Tide stuns LSU in savage 31–7 win". The Gadsden Times (Google News Archives). Associated Press. p. 22. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  28. ^ a b c d e Land, Charles (November 7, 1965). "Tide's little giants cage burly Tigers". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 11. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  29. ^ Grimsley, Will (November 2, 1965). "Tide climbs to No. 5 spot". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). Associated Press. p. 5. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  30. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Louisiana State". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  31. ^ a b c d e Land, Charles (November 14, 1965). "Sloan pitches, Tide wins". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 9. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  32. ^ a b c d e f Smothers, Jimmy (November 14, 1965). "Sloan brings Tide in for 35–14 win". The Gadsden Times (Google News Archives). p. 21. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  33. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs South Carolina". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  34. ^ a b c d Halbrooks, Hap (November 28, 1965). "Sloan shines as Alabama tramples Auburn 30–3 for conference crown". The Florence Times (Google News Archives). p. 17. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  35. ^ a b c d Smothers, Jimmy (November 28, 1965). "Bama SEC champ after 30–3 romp". The Gadsden Times (Google News Archives). p. 33. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  36. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Auburn". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  37. ^ a b Crittenden, John (January 2, 1966). "'No. 1' Alabama rolls in, 39–28". The Miami News (Google News Archives). p. 1C. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  38. ^ a b Smothers, Jimmy (January 2, 1966). "Bama shoots for No. 1 spot". The Gadsden Times (Google News Archives). p. 21. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  39. ^ a b National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). "National Poll Champions" (PDF). 2012 NCAA Division I Football Records. NCAA.org. p. 73. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  40. ^ Solomon, Jon (January 6, 2010). "Got 12? Here's how Alabama bumped up its claim to a dozen national titles". The Birmingham News (AL.com). Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  41. ^ a b Green, Bob (January 4, 1966). "Tide keeps AP title trophy". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). Associated Press. p. 7. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  42. ^ a b c "Draft History by School–Alabama". National Football League. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  43. ^ "1966 AFL Draft". Sports Reference, LLC. Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  44. ^ Kersey, Jason (August 27, 2012). "NCAA's decision to allow freshman eligibility changed football landscape". The Oklahoman. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  45. ^ Reed, Delbert (January 21, 1972). "Unanimous vote makes SEC frosh eligible". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 6. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  46. ^ a b c d "Tide frosh roll by Auburn, 30–6". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). Associated Press. November 21, 1965. p. 11. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  47. ^ a b Land, Charles (October 5, 1965). "State staves off Baby Tide, 7–6". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 6. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  48. ^ a b c "Tide frosh top Rebels, 27–14". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). October 16, 1965. p. 6. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  49. ^ a b c "Bama frosh turn errors to 19–8 win". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). Associated Press. November 9, 1965. p. 6. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  50. ^ 2012 Alabama Crimson Tide Football Record Book, pp. 187–201
  51. ^ 2012 Alabama Crimson Tide Football Record Book, pp. 202–203