1967 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1967 Alabama Crimson Tide football
Conference Southeastern Conference
Ranking
Coaches #7
AP #8
1967 record 8–2–1 (5–1 SEC)
Head coach Bear Bryant
Captain Ken Stabler
Captain Bobby Johns
Home stadium Denny Stadium
Legion Field
Ladd Stadium
Seasons
« 1966 1968 »
1967 SEC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#2 Tennessee 6 0 0     9 2 0
#8 Alabama 5 1 0     8 2 1
Florida 4 2 0     6 4 0
Ole Miss 4 2 1     6 4 1
Georgia 3 2 0     7 4 0
LSU 3 2 1     7 3 1
Auburn 3 3 0     6 4 0
Kentucky 1 6 0     2 8 0
Vanderbilt 0 6 0     2 7 1
Mississippi State 0 6 0     1 9 0
† – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1967 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1967 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 73rd overall and 34th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his 10th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished season with eight wins, two losses and one tie (8–2–1 overall, 5–1 in the SEC) and with a loss against Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl Classic.

During the spring practice sessions, five African American students attempted to walk-on to the football team. Two of the five, Dock Rone and Andrew Pernell participated in the annual A-Day Game. Although none of the five made it to the varsity squad, their participation as part of the team marked the beginnings of the desegregation of the football program that culminated in the signing of Wilbur Jackson to an athletic scholarship in 1970.

Alabama opened the season ranked #2, but tied unranked Florida State at Birmingham in a game that snapped a 17 game winning streak and surprised many pundits. They rebounded from the tie with victories over Southern Miss in their annual Mobile game, Ole Miss in their first conference game and Vanderbilt in their first road game of the season. In their fifth game against Tennessee, Alabama was defeated 24–13 at Legion Field. The defeat ended a 25-game unbeaten streak for the Crimson Tide that dated back to the 1965 season and was the first for the Volunteers over Alabama since their 1960 season.

After their loss to Tennessee, Alabama again rebounded and won their final five regular season games. After they defeated Clemson at Memorial Stadium, they returned to Tuscaloosa where they defeated Mississippi State on homecoming. The Crimson Tide next defeated LSU at Tiger Stadium, South Carolina in Tuscaloosa, and Auburn in the Iron Bowl after Ken Stabler had his famous, 47-yard "run in the mud" touchdown to win the game. In the January that followed, Alabama lost to Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl Classic.

Desegregation[edit]

Although the University was officially desegregated in summer 1963, full integration of the athletic teams did not occur at that time.[1] By spring 1967, the athletic program was warned by the Office of Education that the lack of African Americans under athletic scholarship was a violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.[1] In February 1967, Dock Rone, an African American student enrolled at the University from Montgomery, met with coach Bryant about potentially trying to make the football team as a walk-on.[2] At that time Bryant believed a non-scholarship, African American walk-on would help pave the way to complete integration of the football team.[2]

On April 1, the football team opened their spring practice, and at that time Rone became the first African American to wear the Alabama uniform.[3] At that time, an additional four African American students reported to practice, but were unable to participate at that time as they had not yet been academically cleared to play.[3] These four other African American students that reported were Melvin Leverett of Prichard, Arthur Dunning of Mobile, Andrew Pernell of Bessemer and Jerome Tucker of Birmingham.[4][5] By the second practice all except for Tucker were declared academically eligible to compete on the football squad and joined the team on April 3.[6]

Throughout spring practice, Rone played as an offensive lineman and Leverett, Dunning and Pernell played as backs.[6] On May 5, Rone and Pernell participated in the annual A-Day Game and became the first African American players to play at Denny Stadium as members of the Crimson Tide football team.[5] Although Rone was on track to potentially become the first African American player on scholarship at Alabama, in the summer that followed family problems forced him to leave school.[5] Three years later, Wilbur Jackson became the first African American to sign and play under athletic scholarship for the Alabama football team.[7]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 23 Florida State* #2 Legion FieldBirmingham, AL T 37–37   71,299
September 30 Southern Miss* #9 Ladd StadiumMobile, AL W 25–3   38,285
October 7 Ole Miss #9 Legion Field • Birmingham, AL (Rivalry) ABC W 21–7   69,281
October 14 at Vanderbilt #7 Dudley FieldNashville, TN W 35–21   33,407
October 21 #7 Tennessee #6 Legion Field • Birmingham, AL (Third Saturday in October) L 13–24   71,849
October 28 at Clemson* Memorial StadiumClemson, SC W 13–10   49,800
November 4 Mississippi Statedagger Denny StadiumTuscaloosa, AL (Rivalry) W 13–0   58,059
November 11 at LSU Tiger StadiumBaton Rouge, LA (Rivalry) W 7–6   68,500
November 18 South Carolina* Denny Stadium • Tuscaloosa, AL W 17–0   46,105
December 2 vs. Auburn #8 Legion Field • Birmingham, AL (Iron Bowl) W 7–3   71,200
January 1, 1968 vs. Texas A&M* #8 Cotton BowlDallas, TX (Cotton Bowl Classic) CBS L 16–20   73,800
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll.
  • Source: Rolltide.com: 1967 Alabama football schedule[8]

Game notes[edit]

Florida State[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Florida State 14 10 3 10 37
#2 Alabama 15 7 0 15 37
  • Date: September 23
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 71,299

To open the 1967 season, Alabama played the Florida State Seminoles to a 37–37 tie and ended a 17 game unbeaten and untied streak that stretched back to their 1965 season.[9][10][11] The Seminoles opened with a pair of early touchdowns first on an 11-yard Kim Hammond pass to Ron Sellers and next on a 75-yard Walt Sumner punt return for a 14–0 lead.[9][10] The Crimson Tide then responded with touchdowns on a two-yard Ken Stabler run and a 51-yard Stabler pass to Dennis Homan coupled with a successful two-point conversion for a 15–14 lead at the end of the first quarter.[9][10] In the second quarter, Florida State scored first on a 27-yard Grant Guthrie field goal followed by Alabama with an 11-yard Ed Morgan touchdown run. The Seminoles then scored on a 13-yard Hammond touchdown pass to Larry Green for a 24–22 halftime lead.[9][10]

After Florida State scored the only third quarter points in the third quarter on a 38-yard Guthrie field goal, both teams traded fourth quarter points for the 37–37 tie.[9][10] After Stabler threw a 17-yard touchdown pass to Homan, the Seminoles responded with a 23-yard Guthrie field goal. Then in the final minutes of the game, Alabama scored their final points on a three-yard Morgan run only to have Florida State tie the game at 37 with their eight-yard touchdown pass to Bill Moremen.[9][10] The tie brought Alabama's all-time record against Florida State to 1–0–1.[12]

Southern Miss[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Southern Miss 0 3 0 0 3
#9 Alabama 0 7 7 11 25
  • Date: September 30
  • Location: Ladd Stadium
    Mobile, AL
  • Game attendance: 38,285

After their tie against Florida State, Alabama dropped from the No. 2 to the No. 9 position in the AP Poll prior to their game against Southern Miss.[15] In their annual game played at Mobile, Alabama defeated the Golden Eagles 25–3 behind three Ken Stabler touchdown passes to Dennis Homan.[11][13][14] After a scoreless first quarter, Stabler thew his first touchdown to Homan on a 20-yard pass and then Southern Miss scored their only points on a 30-yard Ihor Kondrat field goal that made the halftime score 7–3.[13][14] Stabler then threw touchdowns to Homan from six-yards in the third and 33-yards in the fourth. Steve Davis then converted a 30-yard field goal late that made the final score 25–3.[13][14] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Southern Miss to 9–2–1.[16]

Ole Miss[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Ole Miss 0 0 0 7 7
#9 Alabama 0 7 7 7 21
  • Date: October 7
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 69,281

In their conference opener against Ole Miss, Alabama defeated the Rebels 21–7 before a nationally televised audience at Birmingham.[11][17][18] After a scoreless first quarter, the Crimson Tide took a 7–0 halftime lead when Ken Stabler threw an 11-yard touchdown pass to Dennis Homan.[17][18] Stabler then scored on an eight-yard run in the second and Ed Morgan on a one-yard run that capped an 88-yard drive in the fourth for a 21–0 lead.[17][18] Down by three touchdowns, the Rebels scored their only points in the fourth when backup quarterback Terry Collier threw a 23-yard touchdown pass to Mac Haik.[17][18] In the game, Homan led all receivers with 84 yards on eight catches for Alabama and Ole Miss lost five fumbles.[17] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Ole Miss 20–3–2.[19]

Vanderbilt[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
#7 Alabama 14 3 11 7 35
Vanderbilt 0 14 0 7 21
  • Date: October 14
  • Location: Dudley Field
    Nashville, TN
  • Game attendance: 33,407

After their victory over Ole Miss, Alabama moved up into the No. 7 position in the AP Poll prior to their game against Vanderbilt.[22] In an offensive shootout against the Commodores, Alabama won 35–21 at Nashville.[11][20][21] The Crimson Tide took an early 14–0 lead with a pair of Ken Stabler touchdowns in the first quarter. The first came on a 61-yard pass to Dennis Homan and the second on a one-yard run.[20][21] Vanderbilt responded in the second quarter with a pair of David Strong touchdowns that tied the game 14–14. The first came on a seven-yard run and the second on a 13-yard pass from Roger May.[20][21] The Crimson Tide then responded with a 59-yard drive, capped with a 21-yard Steve Davis field goal that gave them a 17–14 halftime lead.[20][21]

After a 31-yard Davis field goal extended the Alabama lead to 20–14, Stabler threw a 15-yard touchdown pass to Homan. A successful two-point conversion on a Pete Jilleba run followed, and the Crimson Tide extended their lead to 28–14 at the end of the third quarter.[20][21] The game then closed with each squad scoring a touchdown in the fourth quarter. Alabama scored first on a two-yard Joe Kelley run followed by a seven-yard May pass to Robert Goodridge by the Commodores that made the final score 35–21.[20][21] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Vanderbilt to 25–16–4.[23]

Tennessee[edit]

Third Saturday in October
1 2 3 4 Total
#7 Tennessee 7 0 10 7 24
#6 Alabama 7 0 0 6 13
  • Date: October 21
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 71,849

After their victory over Vanderbilt, Alabama moved into the No. 6 position in the AP Poll prior to their game against Tennessee.[26] Against the Volunteers, the Crimson Tide lost their first game since the 1965 season and ended a 25-game unbeaten streak with this 24–13 loss.[11][24][25] After Walter Chadwick scored on a one-yard touchdown run for the Vols, Alabama responded with an eight-yard Ken Stabler touchdown that tied the game 7–7 at the end of the first quarter.[24][25] The score remained tied at the half after a scoreless second quarter.

Tennessee then took a 17–7 lead in the third quarter on an 11-yard Chadwick touchdown pass to Ken DeLong and a 47-yard Karl Kremser field goal.[24][25] Alabama responded with their final points early in the fourth quarter on a one-yard Ed Morgan touchdown run, but a Stabler pass was later intercepted by Albert Dorsey and returned 31-yards for a touchdown and a 24–13 Vols victory.[24][25] The Tennessee win was also their first over the Crimson Tide since the 1960 season.[24] In the game, Stabler threw five interceptions.[24] The loss brought Alabama's all-time record against Tennessee to 23–20–7.[27]

Clemson[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 7 6 0 0 13
Clemson 3 0 0 7 10
  • Date: October 28
  • Location: Memorial Stadium
    Clemson, SC
  • Game attendance: 49,800

As a result of their loss against Tennessee, Alabama dropped completely out of the AP Poll prior to their game against Clemson.[30] In their only non-conference road game of the season, the Crimson Tide narrowly defeated the Tigers of the Atlantic Coast Conference 13–10 at Memorial Stadium.[11][28][29] Alabama took a 7–0 lead in the first quarter on a one-yard run Ed Morgan, and Clemson responded with a 30-yard Steedley Candler field goal that made the score 7–3 at the end of the first.[28][29] Alabama then scored their final points of the game on a pair of Steve Davis field goals in the second that made the halftime score 13–3.[28][29] After a scoreless third, Clemson made the final score 13–10 with a one-yard Buddy Gore touchdown run in the fourth quarter.[28][29] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Clemson to 8–3.[31]

Mississippi State[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Mississippi State 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 0 3 7 3 13
  • Date: November 4
  • Location: Denny Stadium
    Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Game attendance: 58,059

On homecoming in Tuscaloosa, the Crimson Tide shutout the Mississippi State Bulldogs 13–0 at Tuscaloosa.[11][32][33] After a scoreless first quarter, Steve Davis gave Alabama a 3–0 halftime lead with his 24-yard field goal in the second quarter.[32][33] The Crimson Tide then closed the game with a one-yard Tommy Wade touchdown run in the third and a 21-yard field goal in the fourth for the 13–0 victory.[32][33] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Mississippi State to 39–10–3.[34]

LSU[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 0 0 0 7 7
LSU 0 0 0 6 6
  • Date: November 11
  • Location: Tiger Stadium
    Baton Rouge, LA
  • Game attendance: 68,500

Although Steve Davis missed three field goals for Alabama in the game, the Crimson Tide defeated the LSU Tigers 7–6 at Tiger Stadium.[11][35][36] After three shutout quarters, Alabama scored their only points early in the fourth on a one-yard Ed Morgan touchdown run for a 7–0 lead.[35][36] Tommy Allen then scored the Tigers only points later in the quarter with his four-yard run. However, Roy Hurd missed the extra point attempt and LSU lost 7–6.[35][36] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against LSU to 19–8–4.[37]

South Carolina[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
South Carolina 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 0 10 7 0 17
  • Date: November 18
  • Location: Denny Stadium
    Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Game attendance: 46,105

In the final Tuscaloosa game of the season, Alabama shutout the South Carolina Gamecocks 17–0 at Denny Stadium.[11][38][39] After a scoreless first quarter, the Crimson Tide took a 10–0 halftime lead on a 24-yard Steve Davis field goal and a 38-yard Ken Stabler pass to Dennis Homan.[38][39] Tommy Wade then made the final score 17–0 with his one-yard touchdown run in the third quarter.[38][39] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against South Carolina to 7–0.[40]

Auburn[edit]

Iron Bowl
1 2 3 4 Total
Auburn 0 0 3 0 3
#8 Alabama 0 0 0 7 7
  • Date: December 2
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 71,200

In the annual Iron Bowl game, Alabama defeated the Auburn Tigers 7–3 in rainy conditions at Legion Field behind Ken Stabler's 47-yard "Run in the Mud" for the game's only touchdown in the fourth quarter.[11][41][42][43] The only other points in the game came in the third quarter on a 38-yard John Riley field goal for the Tigers.[41][42] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Auburn to 17–14–1.[44]

Texas A&M[edit]

Cotton Bowl Classic
1 2 3 4 Total
Texas A&M 7 6 7 0 20
#8 Alabama 7 3 6 0 16
  • Date: January 1, 1968
  • Location: Cotton Bowl
    Dallas, TX
  • Game attendance: 73,800

After Texas A&M upset Alabama 20–16 in the Cotton Bowl Classic, Bear Bryant carried the Aggies head coach Gene Stallings off the field to celebrate the victory as he was both a former player and assistant coach under him Bryant.[45][46] After Alabama scored first on an eight-yard Ken Stabler touchdown run, A&M responded with a 13-yard Edd Hargett touchdown pass to Larry Stegent that tied the game 7–7 at the end of the first quarter.[45][46] In the second quarter, the Crimson Tide scored first on s 34-yard Steve Davis field goal and the Aggies followed with a seven-yard Hargett touchdown pass to Tommy Maxwell that made the halftime score 13–10.[45][46] Each team then scored their final points in the third quarter. A&M scored first on a 20-yard Wendell Housley touchdown run followed by Stabler on an eight-yard touchdown run that made the final score 20–16.[45][46] The loss brought Alabama's all-time record against Texas A&M to 1–1.[47]

NFL Draft[edit]

Several players that were varsity lettermen from the 1967 squad were drafted into the National Football League (NFL) between the 1968 and 1969 drafts. These players included the following:

Year Round Overall Player name Position NFL team
1968 NFL Draft
[48]
1 20 Homan, DennisDennis Homan Wide receiver Dallas Cowboys
2 52 Stabler, KenKen Stabler Quarterback Oakland Raiders
12 320 Johns, BobbyBobby Johns Defensive back Kansas City Chiefs
1969 NFL Draft
[48]
10 260 Hall, MikeMike Hall Linebacker New York Jets
16 413 Davis, WilliamWilliam Davis Linebacker Oakland Raiders

Freshman squad[edit]

Prior to the 1972 college football season, NCAA rules prohibited freshmen from participating on the varsity team, and as such many schools fielded freshmen teams.[49][50] The Alabama freshmen squad was led by coach Clem Gryska for the 1967 season and finished with a record of three wins and one loss (3–1).[51] The Baby Tide opened their season with a 34–14 victory over Mississippi State at Scott Field.[52] On the first play of the game, Frank Mann threw a 63-yard touchdown pass to George Ranager for a 6–0 lead, and later in the first Roger Crowson scored on a 23-yard run that extended the Baby Tide lead to 13–0.[52] State then scored their first touchdown in the final 0:30 of the quarter on a nine-yard Joe Joy touchdown catch that made the score 13–6.[52] After a scoreless second, in the third Bill Ragle scored for Alabama on a 15-yard run followed by Cam Walker on a two-yard run that extended their lead to 27–6.[52] The game came to a close with a pair of fourth-quarter touchdowns. First Tommy Weigand scored on a six-yard run for Alabama and this was followed with a 53-yard David Smith touchdown pass for State that made the final score 34–14.[52]

In their second game, the Alabama freshmen lost their only game of the season at home against Ole Miss 21–2.[53] After a scoreless first quarter, the Rebels took a 7–0 lead in the second on a 31-yard pass from Don Farrar to Floyd Franks.[53] Ole Miss still led into the fourth quarter when Alabama scored their only points on a safety when Gene Gellerstedt blocked a Rebels punt out of the endzone.[53] Randy Reed responded with the final tow touchdowns of the game first on a recovered fumble and the second on a one-yard run for the 21–2 victory.[53]

At Knoxville, Alabama defeated the Tennessee freshmen 7–3 for their third consecutive victory over the Volunteers.[54] George Hunt scored for the Vols at the end of the second quarter on a 33-yard field goal and Alabama responded in the third on a 55-yard Benny Rippetoe touchdown pass to George Ranager for the 7–3 victory.[54] At Cliff Hare Stadium, Alabama scored all of their points in a span of 1:34 of the first quarter and held on to win 14–6 at Auburn.[51] The Baby Tide scored first on a 55-yard Benny Rippetoe touchdown pass to George Ranager and was followed with a block of a Roy Davis punt by Rod Steakley that was returned by Hal Willcutt for a 14–0 Alabama lead.[51] Mac Crawford scored the only points for Auburn late in the fourth quarter on his one-yard run that made the final score 14–6.[51]

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ a b Land, Charles (March 28, 1967). "First Negro may try out for Tide football team". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 6. Retrieved October 21, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Dunnavant p. 275
  3. ^ a b Land, Charles (April 2, 1967). "Tide turns up with a spring crowd". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 13. Retrieved October 21, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Bryant checks Negro hopefuls". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). April 6, 1967. p. 9. Retrieved October 21, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c Dunnavant p. 276
  6. ^ a b Bain, Roy (April 4, 1967). "Tiders improving in spring drills". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 6. Retrieved October 21, 2013. 
  7. ^ Marshall, Phillip (July 23, 2006). "Jackson made history as first black Tide football player". The Gadsden Times (Google News Archives). p. C7. Retrieved October 21, 2013. 
  8. ^ "1967 Alabama football schedule". RollTide.com. University of Alabama Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g Smothers, Jimmy (September 24, 1967). "Tide washes out". The Gadsden Times (Google News Archives). p. 17. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g "Bama, FSU tie in 37–37 game". Ocala Star-Banner (Google News Archives). Associated Press. September 24, 1967. p. 15. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j 1967 Season Recap
  12. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Florida State". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  13. ^ a b c d "Stabler-to-Homan sparks Tide, 25–3". Rome News-Tribune (Google News Archives). UPI. October 1, 1967. p. 10. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  14. ^ a b c d Halbrooks, Hap (October 1, 1967). "Tide machine rolling". The Florence Times (Google News Archives). p. 19. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  15. ^ Olan, Ben (September 26, 1967). "Tide retains spot in rankings – 9th". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). Associated Press. p. 6. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  16. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Southern Mississippi". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  17. ^ a b c d e f Land, Charles (October 8, 1967). "Tide's high again, Rebels fall, 21–7". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 13. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  18. ^ a b c d e "Stabler, Bama dump Ole Miss". St. Joseph News-Press (Google News Archives). Associated Press. October 8, 1967. p. 4D. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  19. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Mississippi". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f g Land, Charles (October 15, 1967). "Tide tops tough Vandy". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 11. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  21. ^ a b c d e f g "Bama gets by Vandy in offensive show". The Gadsden Times (Google News Archives). Associated Press. October 15, 1967. p. 15. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  22. ^ "Southern Cal maintains strong hold on first place". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). Associated Press. October 10, 1967. p. 6. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  23. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Vanderbilt". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  24. ^ a b c d e f g Land, Charles (October 22, 1967). "Vols bag a 'Big One'". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 11. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  25. ^ a b c d e "Tide dealt first loss as Vols end streak". Ocala Star-Banner (Google News Archives). Associated Press. October 22, 1967. p. 11. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  26. ^ Olan, Ben (October 17, 1967). "Alabama climbs to 6th". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). Associated Press. p. 6. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  27. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Tennessee". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  28. ^ a b c d e Land, Charles (October 29, 1967). "Tide escaped tiger trap in 'Death Valley,' 13–10". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 11. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  29. ^ a b c d e Timms, Leslie (October 29, 1967). "Bear's Crimson downs Clemson". Spartanburg Herald-Journal (Google News Archives). p. B1. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  30. ^ Olan, Ben (October 24, 1967). "Tide tumbles from top ten". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). Associated Press. p. 5. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  31. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Clemson". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  32. ^ a b c d Land, Charles (November 5, 1967). "Crimson tide stumbles past punchless Bulldogs". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 13. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  33. ^ a b c d "Underclassman sparks Alabama past punchless Mississippi State 13–0". Rome News-Tribune (Google News Archives). Associated Press. November 5, 1967. p. 11. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  34. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Mississippi State". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  35. ^ a b c d Land, Charles (November 12, 1967). "Tiders grow up, win big one 7–6". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 13. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  36. ^ a b c d Smothers, Jimmy (November 12, 1967). "Red elephants grow tall". The Gadsden times (Google News Archives). p. 12. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  37. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Louisiana State". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  38. ^ a b c d Land, Charles (November 19, 1967). "Cotton-pickin Tide bags Gamecocks". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 13. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  39. ^ a b c d Granger, Gene (November 19, 1967). "High tide washes out USC". Spartanburg Herald-Journal (Google News Archives). p. B1. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  40. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs South Carolina". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  41. ^ a b c Land, Charles (December 3, 1967). "Stabler scoot sinks Tigers". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 14. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  42. ^ a b c Thomas, Ronnie (December 3, 1967). "Alabama whips Auburn in thriller, 7–3". The Florence Times (Google News Archives). p. 13. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  43. ^ Hicks, Tommy (2011). Game of My Life Alabama Crimson Tide: Memorable Stories of Crimson Tide Football. New York City: Skyhorse Publishing. p. Chapter 10. ISBN 1613210078. 
  44. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Auburn". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  45. ^ a b c d e Land, Charles (January 2, 1968). "Tide upstaged, upset 20–16". The Tuscaloosa News. p. 6. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  46. ^ a b c d e Thomas, Ronnie (January 2, 1968). "Pupil teaches old coach lesson as Texas A&M upsets Alabama, 20–16". The Tuscaloosa News. p. 10. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  47. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Texas A&M". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  48. ^ a b "Draft History by School–Alabama". National Football League. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  49. ^ Kersey, Jason (August 27, 2012). "NCAA's decision to allow freshman eligibility changed football landscape". The Oklahoman. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  50. ^ Reed, Delbert (January 21, 1972). "Unanimous vote makes SEC frosh eligible". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 6. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  51. ^ a b c d Sims, Ben (November 26, 1967). "Baby Tide trims Tiger cubs". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 14. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  52. ^ a b c d e Land, Charles (October 7, 1967). "Baby Tide opens with 34–14 victory". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 7. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  53. ^ a b c d Land, Charles (October 21, 1967). "Baby Tide makes 21–2 mistake". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). p. 7. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  54. ^ a b "Tide frosh bounce Vols". The Tuscaloosa News (Google News Archives). Associated Press. November 18, 1967. p. 6. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  55. ^ 2012 Alabama Crimson Tide Football Record Book, pp. 187–201
  56. ^ 2012 Alabama Crimson Tide Football Record Book, pp. 202–203