1969–70 South Africa rugby union tour of Britain and Ireland

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The 1969–70 South Africa rugby union tour of Britain and Ireland was a rugby union tour by the South Africa national rugby union team to the Northern Hemisphere.

There were a number of anti-apartheid protests throughout the tour.[1]

Context[edit]

The controversial tour happened during the apartheid era in South Africa, and came shortly after the D'Oliveira affair. There were protests at many of the matches, by anti-apartheid campaigners, calling themselves 'Stop the Seventy Tour', organised by Peter Hain. Future British Prime Minister Gordon Brown was the group's Edinburgh organiser.[2]

Matches[edit]

Scores and results list South Africa's points tally first.
Opposing Team For Against Date Venue Status
Oxford University 3 6 5 November 1969 Twickenham, London Tour match
Midland Counties East 11 9 8 November 1969 Leicester Tour match
Newport 6 11 12 November 1969 Rodney Parade, Newport Tour match
Swansea 12 0 15 November 1969 St Helens, Swansea Tour match
Gwent 8 14 19 November 1969 Ebbw Vale Tour match
London Counties 22 6 22 November 1969 Twickenham, London Tour match
North West Counties 12 9 26 November 1969 White City Stadium, Manchester Tour match
New Brighton/North of Ireland 22 6 30 November 1969 New Brighton Tour match
North and Midlands of Scotland 37 3 2 December 1969 Aberdeen Tour match
Scotland 3 6 6 December 1969 Murrayfield, Edinburgh Test match
Aberavon/Neath 27 0 10 December 1969 Talbot Athletic Ground, Aberavon Tour match
Cardiff 17 3 13 December 1969 Cardiff Arms Park, Cardiff Tour match
Combined Services 14 6 16 December 1969 Aldershot Military Stadium, Aldershot Tour match
England 8 11 20 December 1969 Twickenham, London Test match
South West Counties 9 6 December 1969 Exeter Tour match
Western Counties 3 3 December 1969 Bristol Tour match
North East Counties 24 11 3 January 1970 Gosforth Tour match
Midland Counties West 21 6 6 January 1970 Coventry Tour match
Ireland 8 8 10 January 1970 Lansdowne Road, Dublin Test match
Munster 25 9 14 January 1970 Limerick Tour match
South of Scotland 3 3 17 January 1970 Galashiels Tour match
Llanelli 10 9 20 January 1970 Stradey Park, Llanelli Tour match
Wales 6 6 24 January 1970 Cardiff Arms Park, Cardiff Test match
Southern Counties 13 0 28 January 1970 Gloucester Tour match
Barbarians 21 12 31 January 1970 Twickenham, London Final Challenge

Touring party[edit]

Management[edit]

Backs[edit]

  • H. O. de Villiers (Western Province)
  • Paul Durand (Western Province)
  • Renier Grobler (Northern Transvaal)
  • Gert Muller (Western Province)
  • Syd Nomis (Transvaal)
  • Andy van der Watt (Western Province)
  • Eben Olivier (Western Province)
  • Tonie Roux (Northern Transvaal)
  • J. P. van der Merwe (Western Province)
  • Johan van der Schyff (Western Transvaal)
  • Mannetjies Roux (Griqualand West) replacement during tour
  • Mike Lawless (Western Province)
  • Piet Visagie (Griqualand West)
  • Dawie de Villiers (Boland)
  • Dirkie de Vos (Western Transvaal)

Forwards[edit]

  • Mof Myburgh (Northern Transvaal)
  • Tiny Neethling (Western Province)
  • Hannes Marais (Eastern Province)
  • Ronnie Potgieter (Northern Transvaal)
  • Gawie Carelse (Eastern Province)
  • André de Wet (Western Province)
  • Frik du Preez (Northern Transvaal)
  • Gys Pitzer (Northern Transvaal)
  • Don Walton (Natal)
  • Martin van Rensburg (Natal)
  • Albie Bates (Western Transvaal)
  • Jan Ellis (South West Africa)
  • Piet Greyling (Transvaal)
  • Piet van Deventer (Griqualand West)
  • Tommy Bedford (Natal)
  • Mike Jennings (Boland)
  • Sakkie de Klerk (Transvaal) replacement during tour
  • Charlie Cockrell (Western Province) replacement during tour
  • Robbie Barnard (Transvaal) replacement during tour

References[edit]

  1. ^ John Inverdale (20 September 2006). "Remembering bitter Springboks tour that paved a way for change". The Telegraph (Telegraph Media Group). Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  2. ^ Carolyn Hitt (19 November 2002). "Rebel with a cause Hain recalls his days on the rugby protest frontline.". Western Mail. The Free Library. Retrieved 24 August 2013.