1969 Giro d'Italia

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1969 Giro d'Italia
Race details
Dates 16 May - 8 June
Stages 23
Distance 3,851 km (2,393 mi)
Winning time 106h 47' 03" (36.066 km/h or 22.410 mph)
Palmares
Winner  Felice Gimondi (ITA) (Salvarani)
Second  Claudio Michelotto (ITA) (Max Meyer)
Third  Italo Zilioli (ITA) (Filotex)

Points  Franco Bitossi (ITA) (Filotex)
Mountains  Claudio Michelotto (ITA) (Max Meyer)
Team Molteni
1968
1970

The 1969 Giro d'Italia of cycling, 52nd edition of the Corsa Rosa, was held from 16 May to 8 June 1969. It consisted of 23 stages and was won by Felice Gimondi.

Merckx, who was leading the general classification, was excluded from the race after an extremely controversial anti-doping control in Savona.[1][2][3][4][5]

Teams[edit]

A total of 13 teams were invited to participate in the 1969 Giro d'Italia.[6] Each team sent a squad of ten riders, so the Giro began with a peloton of 130 cyclists.[6] Out of the 130 riders that started this edition of the Giro d'Italia, a total of 81 riders made it to the finish in Milan.[7]

The 13 teams that took part in the race were:[6]

  • Eliolona
  • Faema
  • Ferretti
  • Filotex
  • G.B.C.
  • Germanvox
  • Griss 2000
  • Max Meyer
  • Molteni
  • Sagit
  • Salvarani
  • Sanson
  • Scic

Route and stages[edit]

Stage results[7]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
1 16 May Garda to Brescia 142 km (88 mi) Plain stage  Giancarlo Polidori (ITA)
2 17 May Brescia to Mirandola 180 km (112 mi) Plain stage  Davide Boifava (ITA)
3 18 May Mirandola to Montecatini Terme 188 km (117 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Eddy Merckx (BEL)
4 19 May Montecatini Terme to Montecatini Terme 21 km (13 mi) Individual time trial  Eddy Merckx (BEL)
5 20 May Montecatini Terme to Follonica 194 km (121 mi) Plain stage  Albert Van Vlierberghe (BEL)
6 21 May Follonica to Viterbo 198 km (123 mi) Plain stage  Franco Cortinovis (ITA)
7 22 May Viterbo to Terracina 206 km (128 mi) Plain stage  Eddy Merckx (BEL)
8 23 May Terracina to Naples 133 km (83 mi) Plain stage  Marino Basso (ITA)
9 24 May Naples to Potenza 173 km (107 mi) Plain stage  Michele Dancelli (ITA)
10 25 May Potenza to Campitello Matese 254 km (158 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Carlo Chiappano (ITA)
11 26 May Campobasso to Scanno 165 km (103 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Franco Bitossi (ITA)
12 27 May Scanno to Silvi Marina 180 km (112 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Ugo Colombo (ITA)
13 28 May Silvi Marina to Senigallia 166 km (103 mi) Plain stage  Marino Basso (ITA)
14 29 May Senigallia to San Marino (San Marino) 185 km (115 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Franco Bitossi (ITA)
15 30 May Cesenatico to San Marino (San Marino) 49.3 km (31 mi) Individual time trial  Eddy Merckx (BEL)
31 May Rest day
16 1 June Parma to Savona 234 km (145 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Roberto Ballini (ITA)
17 2 June Celle Ligure to Pavia 182 km (113 mi) Plain stage  Ole Ritter (DEN)
18a 3 June Pavia to Zingonia 115 km (71 mi) Plain stage  Marino Basso (ITA)
18b Zingonia to San Pellegrino Terme 100 km (62 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Marino Basso (ITA)
19 4 June San Pellegrino Terme to Folgaria 248 km (154 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Italo Zilioli (ITA)
20 5 June Trento to Marmolada 230 km (143 mi) Plain stage Stage Cancelled
21 6 June Rocca Pietore to Cavalese 131 km (81 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Claudio Michelotto (ITA)
22 7 June Cavalese to Folgarida 150 km (93 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Vittorio Adorni (ITA)
23 8 June Folgarida to Milan 257 km (160 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Attilio Benfatto (ITA)
Total 3,851 km (2,393 mi)

Classification leadership[edit]

Two different jerseys were worn during the 1969 Giro d'Italia. The leader of the general classification – calculated by adding the stage finish times of each rider – wore a pink jersey. This classification is the most important of the race, and its winner is considered as the winner of the Giro.[8]

For the points classification, which awarded a red jersey to its leader,[9] cyclists were given points for finishing a stage in the top 15.[10] The mountains classification leader. The climbs were ranked in first and second categories. In this ranking, points were won by reaching the summit of a climb ahead of other cyclists. Although no jersey was awarded, there was also one classification for the teams, in which the stage finish times of the best three cyclists per team were added; the leading team was the one with the lowest total time.[8]

Classification leadership by stage
Stage Winner General classification
A pink jersey
Points classification
A red jersey
Mountains classification Team classification
1 Giancarlo Polidori Giancarlo Polidori Giancarlo Polidori not awarded Molteni
2 Davide Boifava Davide Boifava
3 Eddy Merckx Giancarlo Polidori Eddy Merckx
4 Eddy Merckx Eddy Merckx
5 Albert Van Vlierberghe
6 Franco Cortinovis
7 Eddy Merckx
8 Marino Basso
9 Michele Dancelli Eddy Merckx
10 Carlo Chiappano Eddy Merckx & Carlo Chiappano
11 Franco Bitossi Franco Bitossi
12 Ugo Colombo Silvano Schiavon Michele Dancelli
13 Marino Basso
14 Franco Bitossi Eddy Merckx Franco Bitossi
15 Eddy Merckx Eddy Merckx
16 Roberto Ballini
17 Ole Ritter Felice Gimondi Franco Bitossi
18a Marino Basso
18b Marino Basso
19 Italo Zilioli
20 Stage Cancelled
21 Claudio Michelotto Claudio Michellotto
22 Vittorio Adorni
23 Attilio Benfatto
Final Felice Gimondi Franco Bitossi Claudio Michellotto Molteni

Final standings[edit]

Legend
  A pink jersey   Denotes the winner of the General classification   A red jersey   Denotes the winner of the Points classification

General classification[edit]

Final general classification (1–10)[7][11][12]
Rank Name Team Time
1  Felice Gimondi (ITA) Pink jersey Salvarani 128h 4' 27"
2  Claudio Michelotto (ITA) Max Meyer + 3' 35"
3  Italo Zilioli (ITA) Filotex + 4' 48"
4  Silvano Schiavon (ITA) Sanson + 7' 01"
5  Ugo Colombo (ITA) Filotex + 11' 54"
6  Michele Dancelli (ITA) Molteni + 14' 05"
7  Aldo Moser (ITA) G.B.C. + 20' 05"
8  Primo Mori (ITA) Max Meyer + 20' 25"
9  Rudi Altig (FRG) Salvarani + 23' 57"
10  Franco Bitossi (ITA) green jersey Filotex + 31' 36"

Mountains classification[edit]

Final mountains classification (1–10)[7][11][12]
Rank Name Team Points
1  Claudio Michelotto (ITA) Max Meyer 330
2  Italo Zilioli (ITA) Filotex 250
3  Felice Gimondi (ITA) Pink jersey Salvarani 230
4  Michele Dancelli (ITA) Molteni 220
5  Ugo Colombo (ITA) Filotex 130
 Silvano Schiavon (ITA) Sanson
7  Julio Jiménez (ESP) Eliolona 120
8  Franco Bitossi (ITA) green jersey Filotex 100
9  Vittorio Adorni (ITA) Scic 80
10  Wladimiro Panizza (ITA) Salvarani 60

Points classification[edit]

Final points classification (1–10)[7][12]
Rank Name Team Points
1  Franco Bitossi (ITA) green jersey Filotex 182
2  Marino Basso (ITA) Molteni 166
3  Michele Dancelli (ITA) Molteni 129
4  Felice Gimondi (ITA) Pink jersey Salvarani 126
5  Luigi Sgarbozza (ITA) Max Meyer 118
6  Italo Zilioli (ITA) Filotex 107
7  Ugo Colombo (ITA) Filotex 103
8  Silvano Schiavon (ITA) Sanson 98
9  Dino Zandegù (ITA) Salvarani 95
10  Rudi Altig (FRG) Salvarani 90

Teams classification[edit]

Final team classification (1–10)[7][12]
Rank Team Points
1 Molteni 4871
2 Filotex 3663
3 Salvarani 3332
4 Faema 3155
5 Max Meyer 3128
6 Sanson 2248
7 Scic 2138
8 Eliolona 1114
9 G.B.C. 1059
10 Germanvox 1039


References[edit]

Citations
  1. ^ http://hemeroteca.mundodeportivo.com/preview/1969/06/04/pagina-1/949927/pdf.html
  2. ^ http://hemeroteca.mundodeportivo.com/preview/1969/06/04/pagina-12/949938/pdf.html
  3. ^ http://hemeroteca.mundodeportivo.com/preview/1969/06/04/pagina-13/949939/pdf.html
  4. ^ http://hemeroteca.mundodeportivo.com/preview/1969/06/04/pagina-14/949940/pdf.html
  5. ^ "Merckx è stato drogato?" [Merckx was drugged?]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 3 June 1969. p. 1. Archived from the original on 23 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c "In 130 al "via"" [In 130 the "way"]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 16 May 1969. p. 2. Archived from the original on 28 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f Bill and Carol McGann. "1969 Giro d'Italia". Bike Race Info. Dog Ear Publishing. Archived from the original on 27 February 2014. Retrieved 2012-07-10. 
  8. ^ a b Laura Weislo (13 May 2008). "Giro d'Italia classifications demystified". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 13 July 2013. 
  9. ^ "Trofeo Dreher Forte" [Dreher Forte Trophy]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 20 May 1969. p. 4. Archived from the original on 28 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
  10. ^ "Regolamento" [Regulation]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 19 May 1966. p. 9. Archived from the original on 23 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
  11. ^ a b "Esperada Victoria Final Del Italiano Gimondi" [Expected Final Victory of Italian Gimondi] (in Spanish). Milan, Italy: El Mundo Deportivo. 9 June 1969. p. 20. Archived from the original on 2013-06-30. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  12. ^ a b c d "Un Gimondi felicissimo" [A Happy Gimondi]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 9 June 1969. p. 11. Archived from the original on 23 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.