1970–71 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team

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1970–71 UCLA Bruins men's basketball
Pacific-8 Championship
Steel Bowl Championship
NCAA National Championship Game
vs. Villanova, W, 68–62
Conference Pacific-8 Conference
Ranking
Coaches #1
AP #1
1970–71 record 29–1 (14–0 Pac-8)
Head coach John R. Wooden
Assistant coach Denny Crum
Assistant coach Gary Cunningham
Home arena Pauley Pavilion
Los Angeles, California
Seasons
« 1969–70 1971–72 »
1970–71 Pacific-8 Conference men's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
#1 UCLA 14 0   1.000     29 1   .967
USC 12 2   .857     24 2   .923
Oregon 8 6   .571     17 9   .654
California 8 6   .571     16 9   .640
Washington 6 8   .429     15 13   .536
Oregon State 4 10   .286     12 14   .462
Washington State 2 12   .143     12 14   .462
Stanford 2 12   .143     6 20   .231
As of 1971[1]; Rankings from AP Poll


The 1970–71 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team won the National Collegiate Champion again on March 13, 1971 in the Astrodome Houston, Texas. It became the seventh championship in eight years under head coach John Wooden. UCLA defeated Villanova, 68-62. Villanova's second place was vacated later by NCAA.[2]

Smith Barrier, Executive Sports Editor, The Greensboro Daily News and Record wrote: "Mister John Wooden has a watch factory out in Los Angeles. It's a bit different from most Swiss works. They don't make watches, they win 'em."[2]

UCLA averaged 83.5 points per game, while allowed 71.1 points per game to the opponents. Seniors Sidney Wicks and Curtis Rowe were selected to the consensus All-America team.[3]

The Bruins won in the NCAA West Regional in Salt Lake City, UT, over BYU (91–73) and Long Beach State (57–55) to advance to the Final Four, where they defeated Kansas (68–60) in the semi-final game.

Starting lineup[edit]

Position Player Class
F Sidney Wicks Sr.
F Curtis Rowe Sr.
C Steve Patterson Sr.
G Henry Bibby Jr.
G Kenny Booker Sr.

Players[edit]

Schedule and results[edit]

Date Opponent Results
Dec. 4 Baylor W 108–77
Dec. 5 Rice W 124–78
Dec. 11 Pacific W 100–88
Dec. 12 Tulsa W 95–75
Dec. 22 Missouri W 94–75
Dec. 23 Saint Louis W 79–65
Dec. 29 (n) William and Mary W 90–71
Dec. 30 at Pittsburgh W 77–65
Jan. 2 at Dayton W 106–82
Jan. 8 Washington W 78–69
Jan. 9 Wash. St. W 95–71
Jan. 15 at Stanford W 58–53
Jan. 16 at California W 94–76
Jan. 22 at Loyola (IL) W 87–62
Jan. 23 at Notre Dame L 82–89
Jan. 30 UC Santa Barbara W 74–61*
Feb. 6 at USC W 64–60
Feb. 12 at Oregon W 69–68
Feb. 13 at Oregon St. W 67–65
Feb. 19 Oregon St. W 94–64
Feb. 20 Oregon W 74–67
Feb. 27 Wash. St. W 57–53
Mar. 1 Washington W 71–69
Mar. 5 California W 103–69
Mar. 6 Stanford W 107–72
Mar. 12 USC W 73–62
Mar. 18 (Sweet 16) BYU W 91–73
Mar. 20 (Elite 8) Long Beach St. W 57–55
Mar. 25 (Final Four) Kansas W 68–60
Mar. 27 (Championship) Villanova W 68–62

Note: * = Start of the 88-game winning streak

Notes[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1972 Official Collegiate Basketball Guide, College Athletics Publishing Service, 1971
  2. ^ a b Official Collegiate Basketball Guide 1972, College Athletic Publishing Service, 1972
  3. ^ Jerry Crowe, "In time of great change, Sidney Wicks helped UCLA stay the same", Los Angeles Times, March 2, 2009
  4. ^ "1971 Men's Basketball Team Celebrates 40th Anniversary". uclabruins.com. Feb 26, 2011. Archived from the original on August 5, 2012. 
  5. ^ Kirkpatrick, Curry (November 30, 1981). "Wise In The Ways Of The Wizard". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on August 5, 2012. "Farmer had three other classmates who might have shared in his record, but Tommy Curtis redshirted, Marvelous Marv Vitatoe transferred out of UCLA and Larry Hollyfield transferred in too late to be eligible for the NCAA playoff games in 1971."