1973 Cannes Film Festival

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1973 Cannes Film Festival
CFF73poster.jpg
Official poster of the 26th Cannes Film Festival
Opening film Godspell
Closing film Lady Sings the Blues
Location Cannes, France
Founded 1946
Awards Grand Prix (The Hireling and Scarecrow)
Number of films 24 (In Competition)[1]
14 (Out of Competition)
7 (Short Film)
Festival date 10 May 1973 (1973-05-10) – 25 May 1973 (1973-05-25)
festival-cannes.com/en

The 26th Cannes Film Festival was held on May 10–25, 1973. The Grand Prix went to the The Hireling by Alan Bridges and Scarecrow by Jerry Schatzberg.[2] At this festival two new non-competitive sections were added: 'Étude et documents' and 'Perspectives du Cinéma Français' (which is started by the French Film Directors' Society and runs until 1991).[3]

The festival opened with Godspell, directed by David Greene[4][5][6] and closed with Lady Sings the Blues, directed by Sidney J. Furie.[7] Swastika, a documentary by Philippe Mora, got negative reactions and caused disturbance among audience by showing Adolf Hitler's daily and social life.[8] The Holy Mountain by Alejandro Jodorowsky, created controversy at the festival due to its depiction of extreme violence.[9]

Jury[edit]

Ingrid Bergman, Jury President

Feature film competition[edit]

Films out of competition[edit]

Short film competition[edit]

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Official Selection 1973 : All the Selection". Retrieved 14 December 2013. 
  2. ^ "Awards 1973 : All Awards". Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  3. ^ "1973 - The beautiful". Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  4. ^ "Opening of the Cannes Film Festival". Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  5. ^ "Godspell". Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  6. ^ "Cannes 1973: Luigi ZAMPA interviews, previews and Jacques DUFILHO Godspell". Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  7. ^ "FRANCE: Paul Newman and Diana Ross among stars at Cannes Film Festival prizegiving". Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  8. ^ "College Screens Disturbing Images of 'Swastika'". Los Angeles Times. 7 February 1992. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  9. ^ "THE HOLY MOUNTAIN". Retrieved 10 December 2013. 

External links[edit]