1973 Oklahoma Sooners football team

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1973 Oklahoma Sooners football
Big Eight Champions
Conference Big Eight Conference
Ranking
Coaches #2
AP #3
1973 record 10–0–1 (7–0 Big 8)
Head coach Barry Switzer (1st year)
Offensive coordinator Galen Hall (1st year)
Defensive coordinator Larry Lacewell (4th year)
Home stadium Oklahoma Memorial Stadium (Capacity: 61,836)
Seasons
« 1972 1974 »
1973 Big 8 football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#3 Oklahoma 7 0 0     10 0 1
#7 Nebraska 4 2 1     9 2 1
#18 Kansas 4 2 1     7 4 1
#17 Missouri 3 4 0     8 4 0
Oklahoma State 2 3 2     5 4 2
Colorado 2 5 0     5 6 0
Kansas State 2 5 0     5 6 0
Iowa State 2 5 0     4 7 0
† – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1973 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma in the 1973 college football season. Oklahoma participated as members of the Big Eight Conference and played its home games in Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium where it has played its home games since 1923.[1] The team posted a 10–0–1 overall record and a 7–0 conference record to earn the Conference outright title under first-year head coach Barry Switzer.[2][3] This would be the first of eight consecutive Big Eight Conference championships for the Sooners with Switzer as head coach.[2]

The team was led by three All-Americans: Rod Shoate (Oklahoma's second three-time All-American)[4] the oldest of the Selmon brothers, Lucious,[5] and Eddie Foster.[5] The Selmon brothers Lucious, Lee Roy and Dewey started on the defensive line.[6] The team went undefeated on a schedule that included seven ranked opponents (In order, #1 USC, #17 Miami, #13 Texas, #13 Colorado, #10 Missouri, #18 Kansas, and #10 Nebraska). Five of these opponents finished the season ranked. The team tied with USC in the second game of the season before winning nine consecutive contests. It began the season ranked number 11 and steadily climbed in the polls as the season progressed.[3]

Joe Washington led the team in rushing with 1173 yards, Steve Davis led the team in passing yard for with 934 yards, Tinker Owens led the team in receiving with 472 yards, Davis led the team in scoring with 108 points, Shoate led the team in tackles with 126, and Randy Hughes led the team in interceptions with 5.[7]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 15 at Baylor* #11 Baylor StadiumWaco, TX W 42–14   41,573[8]
September 29 at #1 USC* #8 Los Angeles Memorial ColiseumLos Angeles, CA T 7–7   83,986[8]
October 6 #17 Miami* #6 Oklahoma Memorial StadiumNorman, OK W 24–20   62,040[8]
October 13 vs. #13 Texas* #6 Cotton BowlDallas, TX (Red River Shootout) ABC W 52–13   72,032[8]
October 20 #16 Colorado #3 Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK W 34–7   62,580[8]
October 27 at Kansas State #3 KSU StadiumManhattan, KS W 56–14   29,523[8]
November 3 Iowa State #3 Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK W 34–17   61,876[8]
November 10 at #10 Missouri #3 Memorial StadiumColumbia, MO (Tiger-Sooner Peace Pipe) W 31–3   65,515[8]
November 17 #18 Kansas #3 Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK W 48–20   60,961[8]
November 23 #10 Nebraska #3 Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK (Rivalry) ABC W 27–0   62,257[8]
December 1 at Oklahoma State #2 Lewis FieldStillwater, OK (Bedlam Series) W 45–18   50,964[8]
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll.

[3]

Game notes[edit]

Baylor[edit]

#11 Oklahoma Sooners at Baylor Bears
1 2 3 4 Total
#11 Oklahoma 21 14 0 7 42
Baylor 0 0 6 8 14

[9]


Miami (FL)[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Miami (FL) 7 13 0 0 20
Oklahoma 7 0 14 3 24

[10]


Texas[edit]

#6 Oklahoma Sooners vs. #13 Texas Longhorns
1 2 3 4 Total
#6 Oklahoma 7 14 14 17 52
#13 Texas 3 3 0 7 13

The most points Oklahoma had scored against Texas to date.[11]


Colorado[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Colorado 7 0 0 0 7
• Oklahoma 7 7 7 13 34

[12]


Kansas State[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
• Oklahoma 21 14 14 7 56
Kansas St 0 7 7 0 14
  • Date: KSU Stadium
  • Location: October 27
  • Game attendance: 34,500

[13]


Iowa State[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Iowa St 14 3 0 0 17
• Oklahoma 7 13 7 7 34

Joe Washington 136 Rush Yds [14]


Missouri[edit]

#3 Oklahoma Sooners at #10 Missouri Tigers
1 2 3 4 Total
#3 Oklahoma 7 3 12 9 31
#10 Missouri 3 0 0 0 3

[15]


Nebraska[edit]

#10 Nebraska Cornhuskers at #3 Oklahoma Sooners
1 2 3 4 Total
#10 Nebraska 0 0 0 0 0
#3 Oklahoma 14 0 6 7 27

[16]


Oklahoma State[edit]

See also: Bedlam Series
#2 Oklahoma Sooners at Oklahoma State Cowboys
1 2 3 4 Total
#2 Oklahoma 7 14 7 17 45
Oklahoma State 0 3 3 12 18

[17]


Awards & Honors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Memorial Stadium". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on June 28, 2010. Retrieved June 30, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "OU Football Tradition – 42 Conference Titles". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on June 22, 2010. Retrieved June 30, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c "1973 Football Season". SoonerStats.com. Retrieved June 30, 2010. 
  4. ^ a b "All-American: Rod Shoate". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on May 25, 2010. Retrieved July 1, 2010. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f "All-American: Lucious Selmon". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on May 23, 2010. Retrieved July 1, 2010. 
  6. ^ Seays, Lillian (2005). "LEE ROY SELMON: Small Town Boy-Next-Door Makes Good". Onyx Magazine. Retrieved July 2, 2010. 
  7. ^ "2009 Football Record Book". Big 12 Conference. p. 164. Retrieved July 2, 2010. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k http://www.soonerstats.com/football/seasons/schedule.cfm?seasonid=1973
  9. ^ "Powerful Sooners Rip Baylor in 42-14 Game." Palm Beach Post. 1973 Sept 16.
  10. ^ Palm Beach Post. 1973 Oct 7.
  11. ^ "Sooners Slam Texas, 52-13." Palm Beach Post. October 14, 1973
  12. ^ "Sooners cruise by Colorado; Buckeyes, Michigan triumph." Eugene Register-Guard. 1973 Oct 21.
  13. ^ "Sooners Crush Wildcats." Palm Beach Post. 1973 Oct 28.
  14. ^ "Sooners Get Past Cyclones." Palm Beach Post. 1973 Nov 4.
  15. ^ "Powerful Sooners Rip Missouri, 31-3." Palm Beach Post. November 11, 1973
  16. ^ [1]
  17. ^ "Sooners Corral Cowboys." Palm Beach Post. December 2, 1973
  18. ^ "All-American: Eddie Foster". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on May 25, 2010. Retrieved July 1, 2010. 

External links[edit]