1976 Cotton Bowl Classic

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1976 Cotton Bowl Classic
1 2 3 4 Total
Arkansas 0 10 0 21 31
Georgia 10 0 0 0 10
Date January 1, 1976
Season 1975
Stadium Cotton Bowl
Location Dallas, Texas
MVP Ike Forte, Arkansas

Hal McAfee, Arkansas

Favorite Arkansas by 6
Attendance 77,500
United States TV coverage
Network CBS
Cotton Bowl Classic
 < 1975  1977

The 1976 Cotton Bowl Classic was a post-season college football bowl game between the co-Southwest Conference champion #18 Arkansas Razorbacks[1] and the #12 Georgia Bulldogs. Arkansas defeated Georgia, 31-10 in front of 77,500 spectators.[2]

Setting[edit]

Arkansas[edit]

Arkansas finished the regular season 9-2, came into the game on a five-game winning streak. The Hogs were part of a three-way tie for the Southwest Conference Championship with Texas and Texas A&M. The Hogs lost to Texas, 18-24, but gave #2 Texas A&M its first loss in the regular season finale. The 31-6 upset of the Aggies in War Memorial Stadium is one of the most memorable games in Razorback football history.

Georgia[edit]

Georgia was 9-2 entering the game, tied for second in the Southeastern Conference.

Game summary[edit]

The Bulldogs took an early 10-3 lead. Arkansas wouldn't score a touchdown until Georgia's QB Ray Goff tried a 'shoestring' play. He bent as if to tie his shoe and flipped the ball to Gene Washington, a legal play as long as in one motion, but Razorback Hal McAfee scooped up the ball at the 13 yardline.[3] Ike Forte scored for the Hogs, knotting the game at 10. The two teams skirmished to a 0-0 tie in the third period, with Arkansas missing three field goals, before the Hogs exploded for 21 unanswered to close the game.


References[edit]

  1. ^ "Major Conference Champions." 1975 SWC Champions. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on April 11, 2010.
  2. ^ "Arkansas 31, Georgia 10-Past Classics." History. The official site of the 2011 Cotton Bowl Classic. Retrieved on April 11, 2010
  3. ^ Jones, Mike. "Porkers 'string up' Georgia, 31-10." The Dallas Morning News. 1/2/1976. Article. Retrieved on April 11, 2010.