1979 European Competition for Women's Football

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1979 European Competition for Women's Football
1979 Coppa Europa per Nazioni
Tournament details
Host country Italy
Dates 19 July - 27 July (8 days)
Teams 12
Final positions
Champions  Denmark (1st title)
Runners-up  Italy
Third place  Sweden
Fourth place  England
Tournament statistics
Matches played 16
Goals scored 40 (2.5 per match)
1984

The 1979 European Competition for Women's Football was a women's football tournament contested by European nations. It took place in Italy from 19 to 27 July 1979.

The tournament featured 12 teams, with games staged in Naples and Rimini. Considered unofficial because it was not run under the auspices of UEFA, it was a precursor to the UEFA Women's Championship. Denmark won the tournament, beating hosts Italy 2–0 in the final at Stadio San Paolo.

Tournament review[edit]

Economically, the tournament was not a success:[1]

In the late 1970s the issue of international tournaments for women's football teams was contentious. The international governing body International Federation of Association Football (FIFA) refused several requests to sanction independently organised tournaments, declaring that such matters "were only possible through the National Association and the Confederations." Writing in 2007, Jean Williams observed that "The fact that they had been busy not organising these events seems to have escaped [FIFA's] notice.[2] According to Williams, FIFA's bureaucratic suppression of women's football was becoming unsustainable: "By the 1970s it simply wasn't a viable option for FIFA to ignore women playing the game and hope that they would go away."[3]

The European Confederation, Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), displayed little enthusiasm for women's football and were particularly hostile to Italy's independent women's football federation. Sue Lopez, a member of England's squad, contended that a lack of female representation in UEFA was a contributory factor:[4]

At a conference on 19 February 1980 UEFA resolved to launch its own competition for women's national teams.[5] The meeting minutes had registered the 1979 competition as a "cause for concern".[6]

Results[edit]

First round[edit]

The top team in each group advanced to the semi-finals.

Group A[edit]

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Italy 2 2 0 0 6 1 +5 4
 Norway 2 1 0 1 5 3 +2 2
 Northern Ireland 2 0 0 2 1 8 −7 0

18 July 1979
Italy  4–0  Northern Ireland
Morace Goal 15'42'
Vignotto Goal 33'
Golin Goal 63'
Report
Naples[note 1]
Referee: Limini (Italy)

20 July 1979
Northern Ireland  1–4  Norway
 ? Goal Report Neilsen Goal
Nyborg Goal
Karlsen Goal
Opseth Goal
Naples
Attendance: 3,000

22 July 1979
Italy  2–1  Norway
Golin Goal 7'
Morace Goal 68'
Report Neilsen Goal 55'
Benevento[note 2]
Attendance: 3,000
Referee: Beretta (Italy)

Group B[edit]

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 England 2 2 0 0 5 1 +4 4
 Finland 2 0 1 1 2 4 -2 1
  Switzerland 2 0 1 1 1 3 −2 1

19 July 1979
England  3–1  Finland
 ? Goal
? Goal
? Goal
Report  ? Goal

21 July 1979
Switzerland   1–1  Finland
Barmettler Goal Report  ? Goal

23 July 1979
England  2–0   Switzerland
 ? Goal
? Goal
Report

Group C[edit]

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Denmark 2 2 0 0 5 1 +4 4
 France 2 0 1 1 1 3 -2 1
 Scotland 2 0 1 1 0 2 −2 1

18 July 1979
Denmark  3–1  France
Holst Goal
Hindkjær Goal 50'
Niemann Goal
Report Farrugia Goal 25'
Rimini
Attendance: 500[8]

20 July 1979
France  0–0  Scotland
Report
Rimini
Attendance: 650

22 July 1979
Denmark  2–0  Scotland
Hindkjær Goal x2' Report

Group D[edit]

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Sweden 2 1 1 0 4 1 +3 3
 Netherlands 2 1 1 0 3 1 +2 3
 Wales 2 0 0 2 0 5 −5 0

19 July 1979
12:00
Sweden  3–0  Wales
Ödlund Goal
Sintorn Goal
Lindqvist Goal
Report

21 July 1979
12:00
Wales  0–2  Netherlands
Report De Bakker Goal 40'
Timmer Goal 60' (pen.)

22 July 1979
21:30
Sweden  1–1  Netherlands
Sintorn Goal 2' Report De Bakker Goal 21'

Knockout stage[edit]

Semi-finals Final
25 July – Naples
  Italy  3  
  England  1  
 
28 July – Naples
      Denmark  2
    Italy  0
Third place
25 July – Rimini 27 July – Naples
  Denmark  1   Sweden (pen.)  0 (4)
  Sweden  0     England  0 (3)

Semi-finals[edit]

25 July 1979
Italy  3–1  England
Vignotto Goal 11'65'
Musumeci Goal 70'
Report Curl Goal 49'

25 July 1979
21:30
Denmark  1–0  Sweden
Niemann Goal 25' Report
Rimini
Attendance: 1,000

Third place match[edit]

27 July 1979
Sweden  0–0  England
Report
  Penalties  
4 – 3

Final[edit]

After a goalless first half, Denmark took the lead 10 minutes into the second period through 18–year–old striker Lone Smidt Hansen (who later became Lone Smidt Nielsen through marriage).[10] Inge Hindkjær secured Denmark's victory with her fourth goal of the tournament, four minutes from full-time.[11] After the tournament, the Danish Football Association (DBU) were subject to media criticism for their failure to properly develop women's football.

28 July 1979
21:30
Denmark  2–0  Italy
Smidt Nielsen Goal 51'
Hindkjær Goal 76'
Report
Stadio San Paolo, Naples
Attendance: 15,000
Referee: Pancani (Italy)

Winner[edit]

 European Competition for Women's Football
1979 Winners 

Denmark
First title

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Erik Garin's tournament page at Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation says Italy won this match 4–1.
  2. ^ The Italian Football Federation report says this game took place in Benevento. The Football Association of Norway report says Naples.
  3. ^ The Swedish Football Association list of matches says this game took place in Naples. Sue Lopez's book Women on the Ball suggests nearby Scafati.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Williams 2007, p. 31
  2. ^ Williams 2007, p. 10
  3. ^ Williams 2007, p. 14
  4. ^ Lopez 1997, p. 99
  5. ^ "2013 Uefa Women's Competitions" (PDF). UEFA. August 2013. p. 4. Retrieved 12 January 2014. 
  6. ^ Williams 2007, p. 30
  7. ^ Garin, Erik (30 April 2006). "Switzerland - International Matches Women 1970-2003". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 26 August 2012. 
  8. ^ "France 1-3 Danemark" (in French). French Football Federation. Retrieved 26 August 2012. 
  9. ^ "Sveriges motståndare 1973-2011" (in Swedish). Swedish Football Association. Retrieved 26 August 2012. 
  10. ^ Bruun, Peter (2 June 2005). "Progress delights great Dane". UEFA. Retrieved 26 August 2012. 
  11. ^ "Danmark - Italien 2 - 0". Danish Football Association. Retrieved 26 August 2012. 

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]