1979 Michigan Wolverines football team

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1979 Michigan Wolverines football
Michigan Wolverines Logo.svg
Gator Bowl, L 17–15 vs. North Carolina
Conference Big Ten Conference
Ranking
Coaches #19
AP #18
1979 record 8–4 (6–2 Big Ten)
Head coach Bo Schembechler (11th year)
MVP Ron Simpkins
Captain John Arbeznik
Captain Ron Simpkins
Home stadium Michigan Stadium
Seasons
« 1978 1980 »
1979 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#4/4 Ohio State 8 0 0     11 1 0
#10/10 Purdue 7 1 0     10 2 0
#18/19 Michigan 6 2 0     8 4 0
#19/16 Indiana 5 3 0     8 4 0
Iowa 4 4 0     5 6 0
Minnesota 3 5 1     4 6 1
Michigan State 3 5 0     5 6 0
Wisconsin 3 5 0     4 7 0
Illinois 1 6 1     2 8 1
Northwestern 0 9 0     1 10 0
† – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll / Coaches' Poll

The 1979 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team's head coach was Bo Schembechler. The Wolverines played their home games at Michigan Stadium.

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 8, 1979 Northwestern #7/NA Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI W 49–7   100,790
September 15, 1979 #9/11 Notre Dame* #6/5 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI L 10–12   105,111
September 22, 1979 Kansas* #11/12 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 28–7   103,698
September 29, 1979 at California* #11/13 California Memorial StadiumBerkeley, CA W 14–10   57,000
October 6, 1979 at #16/18 Michigan State #11/12 Spartan StadiumEast Lansing, MI ABC W 21–7   79,311
October 13, 1979 Minnesota #11/11 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 31–21   104,677
October 20, 1979 at Illinois #11/11 Memorial StadiumChampaign, Il W 27–7   43,370
October 27, 1979 Indianadagger #10/10 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 27–21   104,832
November 3, 1979 Wisconsin #10/10 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 54–0   104,952
November 10, 1979 at #14/15 Purdue #10/10 Ross–Ade StadiumWest Lafayette, IN L 21–24   69,829
November 17, 1979 #2/3 Ohio State #13/13 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI ABC L 15–18   106,255
December 28, 1979 vs. North Carolina* #14/14 Gator Bowl StadiumJacksonville, FL (Gator Bowl) ABC L 15–17   70,407
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll / Coaches' Poll released prior to game. All times are in Eastern Time.

Game notes[edit]

Northwestern[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Northwestern 0 0 0 7 7
• Michigan 21 14 14 0 49

[1]


Michigan State[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 7 0 7 7 21
Michigan St 0 0 7 0 7

[2]


Indiana[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Indiana 0 14 0 7 21
Michigan 7 0 14 6 27

[3]


Players[edit]

Offense[edit]

Defense[edit]

Kickers[edit]

Awards[edit]

  • All-Americans: Curtis Greer, Ron Simpkins
  • All-Conference: John Arbeznik, Curtis Greer, Ron Simpkins, Mike Jolly, Mike Trgovac, Butch Woolfolk
  • Most Valuable Player: Ron Simpkins
  • Meyer Morton Award: Curtis Greer
  • John Maulbetsch Award: Tony Jackson
  • Frederick Matthei Award: Mike Trgovac
  • Arthur Robinson Scholarship Award: Dan Murray

Professional football[edit]

Twenty-five (25) members of the 1979 Michigan football team went on to play professional football. They are:

  • Kurt Becker (Chicago Bears, 1982–88, 1990, Los Angeles Rams, 1989)
  • Marion Body (Michigan Panthers, 1983)
  • Keith Bostic (Houston Oilers, 1983–88, Cleveland Browns, 1990)
  • Andy Cannavino (Michigan Panthers, 1983, Chicago Blitz, 1984)
  • Brian Carpenter (New York Giants, 1982, Washington Redskins, 1983-84, Buffalo Bills, 1984)
  • Anthony Carter (Michigan Panthers, 1983–84, Oakland Invaders, 1985, Minnesota Vikings, 1985–93, Detroit Lions, 1994-95)
  • Ralph Clayton (St. Louis Cardinals, 1981)
  • Craig Dunaway (Pittsburgh Steelers, 1983)
  • Stanley Edwards (Houston Oilers, 1982–86, Detroit Lions, 1987)
  • Paul Girgash (Michigan Panthers, 1984)
  • Chris Godfrey (New York Jets, 1980, New York Giants, 1984-87, Seattle Seahawks, 1988)
  • Curtis Greer (St. Louis Cardinals, 1980–87)
  • Ali Haji-Sheikh (New York Giants, 1983–85, Atlanta Falcons, 1986, Washington Redskins, 1987)
  • Mike Harden (Denver Broncos, 1980–88, Los Angeles Raiders, 1989–90)
  • Mike Jolly (Green Bay Packers, 1980–83)
  • George Lilja (Los Angeles Rams, 1982, New York Jets, 1983–84, Cleveland Browns, 1984–86, Dallas Cowboys, 1987)
  • Doug Marsh (St. Louis Cardinals, 1980–86)
  • Ed Muransky (Los Angeles Raiders, 1982–84, Orlando Renegades, 1985)
  • Mel Owens (Los Angeles Rams, 1981–89)
  • Bubba Paris (San Francisco 49ers, 1983–90, Indianapolis Colts, 1991, Detroit Lions 1991)
  • Lawrence Ricks (Kansas City Chiefs, 1983–84)
  • Ron Simpkins (Cincinnati Bengals, 1980–86, Green Bay Packers, 1988)
  • Rich Strenger (Detroit Lions, 1983–87)
  • Robert Thompson (Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 1983–84, Detroit Lions, 1987)
  • Butch Woolfolk (New York Giants, 1982–84, Houston Oilers, 1985-86, Detroit Lions, 1987–88)

Coaching staff[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palm Beach Post. 1979 Sept 9.
  2. ^ "Michigan Tops Spartans as Carter Scores TD." Palm Beach Post. 1979 Oct 7.
  3. ^ "Carter's Last-Second Touchdown Catch Lifts Wolverines." Palm Beach Post. 1979 Oct 27.

External links[edit]