197 BC

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Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries: 3rd century BC2nd century BC1st century BC
Decades: 220s BC  210s BC  200s BC  – 190s BC –  180s BC  170s BC  160s BC
Years: 200 BC 199 BC 198 BC197 BC196 BC 195 BC 194 BC
197 BC by topic
Politics
State leadersSovereign states
Birth and death categories
BirthsDeaths
Establishments and disestablishments categories
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
197 BC in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 197 BC
Ab urbe condita 557
Armenian calendar N/A
Assyrian calendar 4554
Bahá'í calendar −2040 – −2039
Bengali calendar −789
Berber calendar 754
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 348
Burmese calendar −834
Byzantine calendar 5312–5313
Chinese calendar 癸卯(Water Rabbit)
2500 or 2440
    — to —
甲辰年 (Wood Dragon)
2501 or 2441
Coptic calendar −480 – −479
Discordian calendar 970
Ethiopian calendar −204 – −203
Hebrew calendar 3564–3565
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat −140 – −139
 - Shaka Samvat N/A
 - Kali Yuga 2905–2906
Holocene calendar 9804
Igbo calendar −1196 – −1195
Iranian calendar 818 BP – 817 BP
Islamic calendar 843 BH – 842 BH
Japanese calendar N/A
Juche calendar N/A
Julian calendar N/A
Korean calendar 2137
Minguo calendar 2108 before ROC
民前2108年
Thai solar calendar 347

Year 197 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Cethegus and Rufus (or, less frequently, year 557 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 197 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Asia Minor[edit]

Egypt[edit]

  • The Egyptian King, Ptolemy V, fights rebels in the Nile Delta, exhibiting great cruelty toward those of their leaders who capitulate.

Greece[edit]

  • The Spartan ruler, Nabis, acquires the important city of Argos from Philip V of Macedon, as the price of his alliance with the Macedonians. Nabis then defects to the Romans in the expectation of being able to hold on to his conquest.
  • The Battle of Cynoscephalae in Thessaly gives a Roman army under pro-consul Titus Quinctius Flamininus a decisive victory over Philip V of Macedon. In the Treaty of Tempe, the terms of the peace proposed by the Roman general and adopted by the Roman Senate specify that Philip V can retain his throne and control of Macedonia, but he has to abandon all the Greek cities he has conquered. Philip also has to provide to the Romans 1,000 talents as indemnity, surrender most of his fleet and provide hostages, including his younger son, Demetrius, who are to be held in Rome. The Aetolians propose that Philip V be ejected from his throne but Flamininus opposes this.

Hispania[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]