1983 Chicago White Sox season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1983 Chicago White Sox
American League West Champions
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) Jerry Reinsdorf
Manager(s) Tony La Russa
Local television WFLD
Sportsvision
(Don Drysdale, Early Wynn, Ken Harrelson, Lorn Brown)
Local radio WMAQ (AM)
(Early Wynn, Joe McConnell, Lorn Brown)
Previous season     Next season

The 1983 Chicago White Sox season was a season in American baseball. It involved the White Sox winning the American League West championship. It marked their first postseason appearance since the 1959 World Series. It was the city of Chicago's first baseball championship of any kind (division, league, or world), since the White Sox themselves reached the World Series twenty-four years earlier.

After the White Sox went through a winning streak around the All-Star break, Texas Rangers manager Doug Rader said the White Sox "...weren't playing well. They're winning ugly."[1] This phrase became a rallying cry for the team, and they are often referred to as the "Winning Ugly" team (and their uniforms as the "Winning Ugly" uniforms).

Offseason[edit]

Regular season[edit]

Ron Kittle won the American League Rookie of the Year Award and set a club record for most home runs by a rookie. He missed the American League home run title by 3 home runs and finished third in the league. He would rank in ninth place in the American League for runs batted in. Kittle would manage to lead the league in strikeouts with 150.

LaMarr Hoyt won the American League Cy Young Award while fellow pitcher Floyd Bannister finished second in the American League in strikeouts. He also won 13 of 14 games after the All-Star Break.

Opening Day lineup[edit]

Season standings[edit]

Team Wins Losses Win % GB
Chicago White Sox 99 63 .611 0
Kansas City Royals 79 83 .488 20.0
Texas Rangers 77 85 .475 22.0
Oakland Athletics 74 88 .457 25.0
California Angels 70 92 .432 29.0
Minnesota Twins 70 92 .432 29.0
Seattle Mariners 60 102 .370 39.0

Notable transactions[edit]

Roster[edit]

1983 Chicago White Sox
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

All-Star game[edit]

The 54th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL) was held on July 6, 1983, at Comiskey Park. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 13-3. The game occurred exactly 50 years to the date of the first All-Star game. The game is best remembered for Fred Lynn's third inning grand slam off of San Franciscos Atlee Hamiker. As of 2012, it is the only grand slam in All-Star Game history.

Player stats[edit]

Batting[edit]

Note: G = Games played; AB = At Bats; R = Runs scored; H = Hits; 2B = Doubles; 3B = Triples; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in; BB = Base on balls; SO = Strikeouts; AVG = Batting average; SB = Stolen bases

Player G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO AVG SB
Harold Baines, RF,CF 156 596 76 167 33 2 20 99 49 85 .280 7
Tony Bernazard, 2B 59 233 30 61 16 2 2 26 17 45 .262 2
Julio Cruz, 2B 99 334 47 84 9 4 1 40 29 44 .251 24
Miguel Diloné, CF 4 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 1
Jerry Dybzinski, SS 127 256 30 59 10 1 1 32 18 29 .230 11
Carlton Fisk, C 138 488 85 141 26 4 26 86 46 88 .289 9
Scott Fletcher, SS,2B 114 262 42 62 16 5 3 31 29 22 .237 5
Lorenzo Gray, 3B 41 78 18 14 3 0 1 4 8 16 .179 1
Jerry Hairston, OF,DH 101 126 17 37 9 1 5 22 23 16 .294 0
Marc Hill, C 58 133 11 30 6 0 1 11 9 24 .226 0
Tim Hulett, 2B 6 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 1
Ron Kittle, LF 145 520 75 132 19 3 35 100 39 150 .254 8
Rusty Kuntz, CF 28 42 6 11 1 0 0 1 6 13 .262 1
Rudy Law, CF 141 501 95 142 20 7 3 34 42 36 .283 77
Vance Law, 3B 145 408 55 99 21 5 4 42 51 56 .243 3
Greg Luzinski, DH 144 502 73 128 26 1 32 95 70 117 .255 2
Chris Nyman, 1B,DH 21 28 12 8 0 0 2 4 4 7 .286 2
Tom Paciorek, 1B,OF 115 420 65 129 32 3 9 63 25 58 .307 6
Casey Parsons, OF 8 5 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 .200 0
Aurelio Rodriguez, 3B 22 20 1 4 1 0 1 1 0 3 .200 0
Joel Skinner, C 6 11 2 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 .273 0
Mike Squires, 1B 143 153 21 34 4 1 1 11 22 11 .222 3
Dave Stegman, OF 30 53 5 9 2 0 0 4 10 9 .170 0
Greg Walker, 1B,DH 118 307 32 83 16 3 10 55 58 57 .270 2
Team totals
162 5484 800 1439 270 42 157 762 527 888 .262 165

Pitching[edit]

Note: W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; G = Games pitched; GS = Games started; SV = Saves; IP = Innings pitched; H = Hits allowed; R = Runs allowed; ER = Earned runs allowed; HR = Home runs allowed; BB = Walks allowed; K = Strikeouts

Player W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB K
Juan Agosto 2 2 4.10 39 0 7 41.2 41 20 19 2 12 29
Floyd Bannister 16 10 3.35 34 34 0 217.1 191 88 81 19 74 193
Salome Barojas 3 3 2.47 52 0 12 87.1 70 24 24 2 34 38
Britt Burns 10 11 3.58 29 26 0 173.2 165 79 69 14 57 115
Richard Dotson 22 7 3.23 35 35 0 240.0 209 92 86 19 107 137
Kevin Hickey 1 2 5.23 23 0 5 20.2 23 14 12 5 13 8
Guy Hoffman 1 0 7.50 11 0 0 6.0 14 5 5 1 2 2
LaMarr Hoyt 24 10 3.66 36 36 0 260.2 236 115 106 27 35 148
Al Jones 0 0 3.86 2 0 0 2.1 3 1 1 0 2 2
Jim Kern 0 0 0.00 1 0 0 0.2 1 1 0 0 0 0
Jerry Koosman 11 7 4.77 37 24 2 169.2 176 96 90 19 55 90
Dennis Lamp 7 7 3.71 49 5 15 116.1 123 52 48 6 36 44
Randy Martz 0 0 3.60 1 1 0 5.0 4 2 2 0 4 1
Steve Mura 0 0 4.38 6 0 0 12.1 13 11 6 1 6 4
Dick Tidrow 2 4 4.22 50 1 7 91.2 86 50 43 13 42 66
Team totals
99 63 3.67 162 162 48 1445.1 1355 650 589 128 479 877

American League Championship Series[edit]

Summary[edit]

Game Score Date Location Attendance
1 Chicago - 2, Baltimore - 1 October 5 Memorial Stadium 51,289
2 Chicago - 0, Baltimore - 4 October 6 Memorial Stadium 52,347
3 Baltimore - 11, Chicago - 1 October 7 Comiskey Park 46,635
4 Baltimore - 3, Chicago - 0 October 8 Comiskey Park 45,477

Game One[edit]

October 5, Memorial Stadium

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 7 0
Baltimore 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 5 1
W: LaMarr Hoyt (1-0)  L: Scott McGregor (0-1)  
HRs: None

Playing in their first postseason game since the 1959 World Series, the White Sox jumped out to a 1-0 series lead behind a complete-game victory by Hoyt, the American League Cy Young Award winner.

Game Two[edit]

October 6, Memorial Stadium

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 2
Baltimore 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 X 4 6 0
W: Mike Boddicker (1-0)  L: Floyd Bannister (0-1)  
HRs: BALGary Roenicke (1)

Game Three[edit]

October 7, Comiskey Park

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Baltimore 3 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 4 11 8 1
Chicago 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 1
W: Mike Flanagan (1-0)  L: Richard Dotson (0-1)  SV: Sammy Stewart (1)
HRs: BALEddie Murray (1)

Game Four[edit]

October 8, Comiskey Park

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 R H E
Baltimore 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 9 0
Chicago 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0
W: Tippy Martinez (1-0)   L: Britt Burns (0-1)  
HRs: BALTito Landrum (1)

Award winners[edit]

  • LaMarr Hoyt, American League Cy Young Award
  • Ron Kittle, American League Rookie of the Year Award
  • Tony La Russa, American League Manager of the Year Award
  • Tony La Russa, Associated Press AL Manager of the Year
  • Roland Hemond, Executive of the Year

All-Star Game

Farm system[edit]

Level Team League Manager
AAA Denver Bears American Association Jim Mahoney
AA Glens Falls White Sox Eastern League Adrian Garrett
A Appleton Foxes Midwest League John Boles
Short-Season A Niagara Falls Sox New York–Penn League Fred Nelson
Rookie GCL White Sox Gulf Coast League Steve Dillard

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Denver, Appleton

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

Preceded by
California Angels
1982
AL West Championship Season
1983
Succeeded by
Kansas City Royals
1984