1983 Grand Prix motorcycle racing season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1983 F.I.M. Grand Prix motorcycle racing season
Previous: 1982 Next: 1984

The 1983 Grand Prix motorcycle racing season was the 35th F.I.M. Road racing World Championship season.

Season summary[edit]

The 1983 battle for 500 cc supremacy between Honda's Freddie Spencer and Yamaha's Kenny Roberts would be one of the most dramatic seasons since the 1967 duel between Giacomo Agostini and Mike Hailwood.[1] As was the case in 1967, the title chase wouldn't be decided until the final race of the season.[1]

1983 would be the last year for the 50cc class as it would be upgraded to 80cc for the 1984 season.[1] Stefan Dörflinger would take the honor of being the last 50cc World Champion.[1] Angel Nieto won the 125 cc crown in dominating fashion, making it his 12th world championship.[1] Carlos Lavado would capture his first 250 cc world championship in a season that saw eight riders share wins over eleven races, Lavado being the only competitor to win more than once.[1] Eighteen-year-old British rider, Alan Carter, created excitement by winning the 250cc French Grand Prix in only his second world championship race, becoming the youngest winner of a 250cc Grand Prix race.[1] Despite the auspicious start to his career, it would be Carter's only Grand Prix victory.[1]

The departure of Kawasaki from the 500cc class left the remaining three Japanese factories to contend for the premier division. Suzuki returned with defending champion, Franco Uncini, Loris Reggiani and Randy Mamola aboard a new version of the RG500 which featured a square tube, welded aluminium frame.[2] The Honda team of Freddie Spencer, Marco Lucchinelli and Takazumi Katayama was made even stronger with the addition of British rider, Ron Haslam, all competing on the three-cylinder NS500. Yamaha team manager Giacomo Agostini had been unable to agree on a contract with rider Graeme Crosby, so AMA Superbike champion Eddie Lawson was brought in as Kenny Roberts' new teammate, both competing with the OW70 YZR500 with a V4 engine.[1] Before the season began, Roberts announced that the 1983 season would be his final year in Grand Prix competition.[1] Cagiva continued to campaign bikes ridden by Jon Ekerold and Virginio Ferrari.

Uncini's title defense was hampered as Suzuki experienced development problems with their chassis which left the team struggling to post good results.[2] Roberts began the season with his YZR500 having problems with overheating and rear suspension, while Spencer started strongly, winning the first three races and five out of the first seven.[1] Roberts was leading the second race in France, when his Yamaha split an expansion chamber causing it to lose power as Spencer won, with Roberts falling to fourth place.[3] The French Grand Prix was marred by the deaths of Japanese rider Iwao Ishikawa during practice after colliding with Reggiani, while Swiss rider, Michel Frutschi, died from injuries sustained during the 500cc race.[4][5][6] In Round 3 at Monza, Roberts crashed while leading Spencer three laps from the finish.[3] Roberts came back to win the German Grand Prix, but then finished second to Spencer in Spain in a race Spencer called one of the toughest of his career.[3]

Things began to go Roberts' way at the Austrian Grand Prix as Roberts won while Spencer's Honda suffered a crankshaft failure.[3] In the Yugoslavian Grand Prix, Roberts' Yamaha failed to start immediately, while Spencer charged to an early lead, leaving Roberts to fight through the field to finish in fourth place.[3] Roberts then went on a three-race winning streak with victories in the Netherlands, Belgium and England, while Spencer stayed close with a third place and two-second place finishes.[7][8] Uncini was injured in an accident at the Dutch TT when he crashed while exiting a curve, then was struck in the helmet by Wayne Gardner's motorcycle as he tried to run off the track. The injury left Uncini in a coma, from which he recovered, but which forced him to sit out the remainder of the season.[2]

The championship then moved to the penultimate round at the Swedish Grand Prix with Spencer holding a two-point lead over Roberts. Roberts led Spencer going into the last lap of the race. Heading down the back straight, Spencer placed his Honda right behind Roberts' Yamaha as they reached the second to the last corner, a ninety degree right-hander. As both riders applied their brakes, Spencer came out of Roberts' slipstream and managed to get inside of the Yamaha. As they exited the corner, both riders ran wide off the track and into the dirt.[9] Spencer was able to get back on the track and back on the power first, crossing the finish line just ahead of Roberts for a crucial victory.[10] Roberts considered Spencer's pass to be foolish and dangerous, and exchanged angry words with him on the podium.[9] Roberts would have to win the final round at the San Marino Grand Prix with Spencer finishing no better than third place in order for Roberts to win his fourth world championship. In a fitting end to a successful career, Roberts won his last-ever Grand Prix race, however Spencer was able to secure second place to claim the world championship.[7][8] The two riders dominated the season with each claiming six victories and six pole positions in the 12 race series.[7][8]

Grands Prix[edit]

Round Race Location 50cc winner 125cc winner 250cc winner 500cc winner Report
1 South Africa South African Grand Prix Kyalami France Jean-François Baldé United States Freddie Spencer Report
2 France French Grand Prix Le Mans Switzerland Stefan Dörflinger Spain Ricardo Tormo United Kingdom Alan Carter United States Freddie Spencer Report
3 Italy Nations Grand Prix Monza Italy Eugenio Lazzarini Spain Ángel Nieto Venezuela Carlos Lavado United States Freddie Spencer Report
4 Germany German Grand Prix Hockenheim Switzerland Stefan Dörflinger Spain Ángel Nieto Venezuela Carlos Lavado United States Kenny Roberts Report
5 Spain Spanish Grand Prix Jarama Italy Eugenio Lazzarini Spain Ángel Nieto France Hervé Guilleux United States Freddie Spencer Report
6 Austria Austrian Grand Prix Salzburgring Spain Ángel Nieto Germany Manfred Herweh United States Kenny Roberts Report
7 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslavian Grand Prix Rijeka Switzerland Stefan Dörflinger Switzerland Bruno Kneubühler Venezuela Carlos Lavado United States Freddie Spencer Report
8 Netherlands Dutch TT Assen Italy Eugenio Lazzarini Spain Ángel Nieto Venezuela Carlos Lavado United States Kenny Roberts Report
9 Belgium Belgian Grand Prix Spa Italy Eugenio Lazzarini Belgium Didier de Radiguès United States Kenny Roberts Report
10 United Kingdom British Grand Prix Silverstone Spain Ángel Nieto France Jacques Bolle United States Kenny Roberts Report
11 Sweden Swedish Grand Prix Anderstorp Switzerland Bruno Kneubühler France Christian Sarron United States Freddie Spencer Report
12 San Marino San Marino Grand Prix Imola Spain Ricardo Tormo Italy Maurizio Vitali United States Kenny Roberts Report

Final standings[edit]

500cc standings[11][12][edit]

Place Rider Number Team Machine Points Wins P.P. F.L.
1 United States Freddie Spencer 3 HRC-Honda NS500 144 6 6 3
2 United States Kenny Roberts 4 Marlboro-Yamaha YZR500 142 6 6 7
3 United States Randy Mamola 6 HB-Suzuki RG500 89 0 0 1
4 United States Eddie Lawson 27 Marlboro-Yamaha YZR500 78 0 0 0
5 Japan Takazumi Katayama 8 HRC-Honda NS500 77 0 0 1
6 France Marc Fontan 10 Sonauto Gauloises-Yamaha YZR500 64 0 0 0
7 Italy Marco Lucchinelli 5 HRC-Honda NS500 48 0 0 0
8 United Kingdom Ron Haslam 9 HRC-Honda NS500 31 0 0 0
9 Italy Franco Uncini 1 HB-Suzuki RG500 31 0 0 0
10 France Raymond Roche 28 HRC-Honda NS500 22 0 0 0
11 Netherlands Boet van Dulmen 12 Shell Nederland RG500 17 0 0 0
12 Netherlands Jack Middelburg 22 Stichting Nederland NS500 12 0 0 0
13 Switzerland Sergio Pellandini 15 Marlboro-Tissot RG500 11 0 0 0
14 United Kingdom Barry Sheene 7 Heron Team Suzuki RG500 9 0 0 0
15 United Kingdom Keith Huewen 47 Heron Team Suzuki RG500 7 0 0 0
16 Italy Gianni Pelletier 28 Hirt Giapauto NS500 3 0 0 0
17 Italy Guido Paci 39 RS500 3 0 0 0
18 Germany Anton Mang 16 HB Suzuki RG500 2 0 0 0
19 Australia Paul Lewis RG500 1 0 0 0
20 United Kingdom Mark Salle RG500 1 0 0 0

250cc standings[13][14][edit]

Place Rider Number Team Machine Points Wins
1 Venezuela Carlos Lavado 5 Venemotos-Yamaha TZ250 100 4
2 France Christian Sarron 10 Sonauto Gauloises-Yamaha TZ250 73 1
3 Belgium Didier de Radiguès 6 Johnson Elf-Chevallier Chevallier-Yamaha 68 1
4 France Hervé Guilleux 44 Kawasaki KR250 63 1
5 France Thierry Espié 57 Elf-Chevallier Chevallier-Yamaha 55 0
6 West Germany Martin Wimmer 4 Mitsui-Yamaha TZ250 45 0
7 Germany Manfred Herweh 19 Massa-Real Real-Rotax 40 1
8 France Jean-François Baldé 12 TopCard Krauser-Chevallier Chevallier-Yamaha 32 1
9 Switzerland Jacques Cornu 2 Höstettler-Yamaha TZ250 32 0
10 France Jacques Bolle 32 Pernod-Yamaha Pernod-TZ250 26 1
11 France Patrick Fernandez 14 Bartol-Yamaha TZ250 26 0
12 United Kingdom Alan Carter 28 Mitsui-Yamaha TZ250 21 1
13 Venezuela Ivan Palazzese 23 Venemotos-Yamaha TZ250 20 0
14 France Thierry Rapicault 26 Sonauto Gauloises-Yamaha TZ250 19 0
15 France Jean-Louis Guignabodet 8 Team Green TZ250 18 0
16 United Kingdom Tony Head 20 Armstrong Armstrong-Rotax 14 0
17 West Germany Reinhold Roth 25 Römer Racing Team TZ250 14 0
18 Spain Sito Pons 15 Cobas Kobas-Rotax 10 0
19 Switzerland Bruno Luscher 34 TZ250 8 0
20 France Guy Bertin 42 MBA 7 0
21 France Jean Michel Mattioli 36 TZ250 5 0
21 Switzerland Roland Freymond 3 Elf Moto Racing Armstrong-Rotax 5 0
23 Luxembourg Jean Marc Toffolo 48 Morena-Rotax 5 0
24 Japan Teruo Fukuda 46 TZ250 4 0
25 France Christian Estrosi 11 Pernod-Yamaha Pernod-TZ250 3 0
25 United Kingdom Donnie Robinson 21 Mitsui-Yamaha TZ250 3 0
25 West Germany Harald Eckl 56 TZ250 3 0
28 Spain Carlos Cardus 59 J.J. Moto Club Cobas-Rotax 2 0
28 Italy Massimo Matteoni 34 Team Forever TZ250 2 0
30 United Kingdom Donnie McLeod 49 Dalmac Racing TZ250 1 0
30 France Bernard Fau 41 TZ250 1 0
30 Australia Graeme McGregoer EMC-Rotax 1 0

125cc standings[edit]

Place Rider Number Country Machine Points Wins
1 Spain Ángel Nieto 1 Spain Garelli 102 6
2 Switzerland Bruno Kneubühler 15 Switzerland MBA 76 2
3 Italy Eugenio Lazzarini 2 Italy Garelli 67 1
4 Italy Maurizio Vitali 13 Italy MBA 67 1
5 Spain Ricardo Tormo 5 Spain MBA 52 1
6 Switzerland Hans Müller 8 Switzerland MBA 43 0
7 Finland Johnny Wickström 10 Finland MBA 42 0
8 Italy Pier Paolo Bianchi 4 Italy Sanvenero 40 0
9 Italy Fausto Gresini Italy Garelli 37 0
10 Austria August Auinger 6 Austria MBA 30 0
11 Pierluigi Aldrovandi 30
12 Gerhard Waibel 22
13 Jean-Claude Selini 20
14 Stefano Caracchi 19
15 Willy Perez 16
16 Lucio Pietroniro 16
17 Henk van Kessel 12
18 Ezio Gianola 10
19 Thomas Moller-Pedersen 6
20 Erich Klein 6
21 Jikka Jaakkola 5
22 Libero Piccirillo 5
23 Giuseppe Ascareggi 3
24 Stefan Dörflinger 3
25 Hugo Vignetti 2
26 Patrick Lagrive 1
27 Jacky Hutteau 1
28 Anton Straver 1

50cc standings[15][edit]

Place Rider Number Country Machine Points Wins
1 Switzerland Stefan Dörflinger 1 Switzerland Krauser 81 3
2 Italy Eugenio Lazzarini 2 Italy Garelli 69 3
3 Italy Claudio Lusuardi 3 Italy Villa 38 0
4 Netherlands Hans Spaan 9 Netherlands Kreidler 34 0
5 Netherlands George Looijestyn 13 Netherlands Kreidler 34 0
6 West Germany Hagen Klein 10 West Germany FKN 33 0
7 Spain Ricardo Tormo 4 Spain Garelli 25 1
8 West Germany Rudolf Kunz West Germany FKN 21 0
9 West Germany Gerhard Bauer 14 West Germany Ziegler 20 0
10 West Germany Rainer Scheidhauer 12 West Germany Kreidler 17 0
10 Netherlands Theo Timmer 7 Netherlands Bultaco 17 0
12 Ingo Emmerich 14
13 Jorge Martinez 10
14 Zdravko Matulja 8
15 Paul Rimmelzwaan 6
16 Graham Singer 6
17 Otto Machinek 6
18 Paul Bordes 5
19 Giuseppe Ascareggi 4
20 Cees Van Dongen 4
21 Daniel Mateos 3
22 Paolo Priori 2
23 Hans Koopman 2
24 Maurizio Stocco 2
25 Massimo De Lorenzi 1

References[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Noyes, Dennis; Scott, Michael (1999), Motocourse: 50 Years Of Moto Grand Prix, Hazleton Publishing Ltd, ISBN 1-874557-83-7 
  2. ^ a b c DeWitt, Norm (September–October 2012). "Franco Uncini – World Champion – Team Manager – Top Official". Classic Racer (157): 22–28. ISSN 1470-4463. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Abrams, Henry Ray (November 1983). Fastest Freddie. American Motorcyclist (Books.Google.com). Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  4. ^ "Michel Frutschi career profile". ozebook.com. Retrieved 5 December 2012. 
  5. ^ "Motorcycle Racing Memorium". motorsportmemorial.org. Retrieved 5 December 2012. 
  6. ^ "Second Le Mans death". The Glasgow Herald. 4 April 1983. p. 16. 
  7. ^ a b c "Kenny Roberts career statistics". motogp.com. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  8. ^ a b c "Freddie Spencer career statistics". motogp.com. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  9. ^ a b "Roberts says he will never again give an inch of track to Spencer". The Modesto Bee. Bee News Services. 12 August 1983. p. 15. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  10. ^ "Roberts vs Spencer". cyclenews.com. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  11. ^ "1983 500cc Final Standings". motogp.com. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  12. ^ "1983 500cc Entries List". f1network.net. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  13. ^ "1983 250cc Final Standings". motogp.com. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  14. ^ "1983 250cc Entries List". f1network.net. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  15. ^ "1983 50cc Final Standings". motogp.com. Retrieved 7 May 2014.