1984–85 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1984–85 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball
A blue block M with maize-colored borders and the word Michigan across the middle.
Big Ten Conference Champions
1985 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, Southeast #1 Seed, Second Round
Conference Big Ten Conference
1984–85 record 26-4 (16-2 Big Ten)
Head coach Bill Frieder
Assistant coach Mike Boyd
Assistant coach Steve Fisher
Assistant coach David Hammer
MVP Roy Tarpley
Captain Leslie Rockymore
Captain Butch Wade
Home arena Crisler Arena
Seasons
« 1983–84 1985–86 »
1984–85 Big Ten Conference men's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
#2 Michigan 16 2   .889     26 4   .867
#12 Illinois 12 6   .667     26 9   .743
Purdue 11 7   .611     20 9   .690
Ohio State 11 7   .611     20 10   .667
Iowa 10 8   .556     21 11   .656
Michigan State 10 8   .556     19 10   .655
Indiana 7 11   .389     19 14   .576
Minnesota 6 12   .333     13 15   .464
Wisconsin 5 13   .278     14 14   .500
Northwestern 2 16   .111     6 22   .214
Rankings from AP Poll)

The 1984–85 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team represented the University of Michigan in intercollegiate college basketball during the 1984–85 season. The team played its home games in the Crisler Arena in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and was a member of the Big Ten Conference. Under the direction of head coach Bill Frieder, the team won the Big Ten Conference.[1] The team earned the number one seed in the 1985 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament where it advanced one round before losing.[2] Although the team began the season unranked it was in the Associated Press Top Twenty Poll a total of twelve of the seventeen weeks, including a peak of number two where it ended the season,[3] and it also ended the season ranked number two in the final UPI Coaches' Poll.[4] During the season, the team led the Big Ten Conference in scoring margin (8.8) and Roy Tarpley led the conference in rebound with a 9.9 average in conference games.[5][6] Leslie Rockymore and Butch Wade served as team captains and Tarpley earned team MVP.[7] Tarpley earned 1985 NCAA All-American recognition.[8]

For the first of five consecutive seasons, the team set the school record for single-season field goal percentage with a 51.3% (941-for-1834) performance.[9] Antoine Joubert's single-season total of 164 assists established a school record that would be eclipsed the following season by Gary Grant. It surpassed Eric Turner's 160 total set in 1983.[10] Grant had 7 steals on January 19, 1985 against Iowa, which tied Rickey Green and Turner for the best single-game totals in school history.[11] Roy Tarpley surpassed his school single-season blocked shots average record of 2.09 set the prior season with an average of 2.20. He would rebreak this record the following season.[12] On February 7, 1985 against Purdue, Tarpley totaled 7 blocks in a game to earn the school single-game record that he would rebreak ten months later.[12]

On January 12, 1985, the team began a 17-game winning streak against the Purdue that continued through a March 15 victory over Fairleigh Dickinson in the NCAA tournament. This stands as the longest winning streak in school history, surpassing the January 29, 1921 – January 6, 1922 14-game streak.[13] On January 5, 1985, the team began a 24-game home winning streak against the Ohio State that continued through a February 15, 1986 victory over Iowa. This stands as the longest home winning streak in school history, surpassing the 22-game January 12, 1976 – November 30, 1977 streak. The streak ended with a February 20, 1986 74–59 loss to Michigan State.[13] January 12 also marked the start of a 10-game road winning streak that continued through a January 4, 1986 victory over Ohio State. This stands as the longest road winning streak in school history, surpassing two 7-game streaks that ended in 1921. The streak ended with a January 16, 1986 73–63 loss to Minnesota.[13]

In the 64-team NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, number one seeded Michigan advanced one round by defeating Fairleigh Dickinson 59–55. In the second round the team was upset by eight-seeded Villanova 59–55.[2] The team was led in scoring and rebounds by Tarpley in both NCAA tournament games.[14]

Rankings[edit]

Ranking movements
Legend: ██ Increase in ranking. ██ Decrease in ranking.
NR = Not ranked. RV = Received votes. ( ) = First place votes.
Week
Poll Pre 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Final 
AP Poll[3] 20 18 13 16 18 10 8 3 3 3 3 2


Team players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Seven players from this team were selected in the NBA Draft.[15][16][17]

Year Round Pick Overall Player NBA Club
1986 1 7 7 Roy Tarpley Dallas Mavericks
1986 5 2 95 Richard Rellford Indiana Pacers
1986 6 1 117 Butch Wade New York Knicks
1986 7 5 144 Robert Henderson Chicago Bulls
1987 6 20 135 Antoine Joubert Detroit Pistons
1988 1 15 15 Gary Grant Seattle SuperSonics

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 68. Retrieved 2010-09-03. 
  2. ^ a b "NCAA Tournament History". University of Michigan. 2010. p. 3. 
  3. ^ a b "Division I Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. pp. 68–83. Retrieved 2010-08-28. 
  4. ^ "Division I Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 87. Retrieved 2010-08-28. 
  5. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 35. Retrieved 2010-09-02. 
  6. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009-10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 36. Retrieved 2010-09-03. 
  7. ^ "All-Time Accolades". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. pp. 9–10. 
  8. ^ "All-Time Accolades". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. pp. 4–7. 
  9. ^ "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 10. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  10. ^ "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 16. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  11. ^ "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 18. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  12. ^ a b "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 19. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  13. ^ a b c "Through The Years". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 7. Retrieved 2010-09-10. 
  14. ^ "NCAA Tournament History". University of Michigan. 2010. p. 4. 
  15. ^ "1986 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  16. ^ "1987 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  17. ^ "1988 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25.