1984 Summer Olympics medal table

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On a grassed outdoor field, three women stand on a podium to the left of the shot, while people wearing all white raise three flags on flagpoles situated at the right of shot.
The medal ceremony for the women's 50 meter rifle three positions

The 1984 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIII Olympiad, were an international multi-sport event held in Los Angeles, California, United States, from 28 July to 12 August 1984. These Games had 6,829 athletes from 140 NOCs participating in a total of 221 events in 23 sports.[1] Athletes from 47 NOCs won medals, of which 25 secured at least a gold medal. As a result, 93 NOCs were left without any medal. The host NOC, the United States, received 83 gold medals, breaking the previous Summer Olympic record of 78 golds, set at the 1904 Summer Olympics. Even so, the United States still won fewer medals than the previous overall record.[2]

Seventeen NOCs chose not to compete at the 1984 Summer Olympics, including fourteen NOCs in a Soviet Union-led boycott.[2] Four years earlier, 61 NOCs – led by the United States – had boycotted the 1980 Summer Olympics staged in Moscow. Nonetheless, Romania, China and Yugoslavia – at the time, ruled by Communist governments – decided to compete in Los Angeles,[3] and finished second, fourth and ninth in the medal standings. In addition, three countries unrelated to the Soviet boycott decided not to compete. Libya withdrew from the competition when two journalists were refused entry to the United States,[4] while Iran boycotted the Games over the United States' support for Israel and "the crimes being committed by the U.S.A. in Latin America, especially in El Salvador."[5] Angola also boycotted the Games, but made no statement as to their reasons. USA officials believed that Angola's withdrawal was related to Soviet financial and political support of the ruling MPLA.[6]

Medal table[edit]

A pair of blonde haired male twins, wearing T-shirts and shorts emblazoned with the USA Olympic team logos.
American twin brothers Lou and Ed Banach won gold medals in the wrestling events.
A chest and head shot of a white male, wearing a white baseball cap backwards and navy blue fleece top.
Curt Harnett, silver medallist for Canada in the 1000 meter time trial
An African-American athlete wearing a blue running top and two gold medals hang from his neck.
Alonzo Babers of the United States won gold medals in the 400 meters and the 4 × 400 meter relay.
An African athlete wearing a light blue and white top and red shorts. He has a silver medal hanging from his neck and holds a posy of flowers.
Gabriel Tiacoh, silver medallist for the Ivory Coast in the 400 meters

The ranking in this table is based on information provided by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and is consistent with IOC convention in its published medal tables. By default, the table is ordered by the number of gold medals the athletes from a National Olympic Committee have won (a nation is represented at a Games by the associated National Olympic Committee). The number of silver medals is taken into consideration next and then the number of bronze medals. If NOCs are still tied, equal ranking is given and they are listed alphabetically by IOC country code.

The number of bronze medals awarded was greater than either the gold or silver. This was due to a number of dead heats for third position, including the women's 100 meter hurdles and men's pole vault. Also, a second bronze medal was awarded for each of the boxing and judo events as there were no third/fourth position tiebreakers held.[7]

In the gymnastic events there were also several dead heats for gold medals, in the women's uneven bars and balance beam, as well as the men's rings. There was a four-way tie for second place in the men's vault resulting in four silver medals being handed out for a single event.[7]

To sort this table by nation, total medal count, or any other column, click on the Sort both.gif icon next to the column title.

      Host country (United States)
      First ever gold medal
      First ever medal

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  United States (USA) 83 61 30 174
2  Romania (ROU) 20 16 17 53
3  West Germany (FRG) 17 19 23 59
4  China (CHN) 15 8 9 32
5  Italy (ITA) 14 6 12 32
6  Canada (CAN) 10 18 16 44
7  Japan (JPN) 10 8 14 32
8  New Zealand (NZL) 8 1 2 11
9  Yugoslavia (YUG) 7 4 7 18
10  South Korea (KOR) 6 6 7 19
11  Great Britain (GBR) 5 11 21 37
12  France (FRA) 5 7 16 28
13  Netherlands (NED) 5 2 6 13
14  Australia (AUS) 4 8 12 24
15  Finland (FIN) 4 2 6 12
16  Sweden (SWE) 2 11 6 19
17  Mexico (MEX) 2 3 1 6
18  Morocco (MAR) 2 0 0 2
19  Brazil (BRA) 1 5 2 8
20  Spain (ESP) 1 2 2 5
21  Belgium (BEL) 1 1 2 4
22  Austria (AUT) 1 1 1 3
23  Kenya (KEN) 1 0 2 3
 Portugal (POR) 1 0 2 3
25  Pakistan (PAK) 1 0 0 1
26  Switzerland (SUI) 0 4 4 8
27  Denmark (DEN) 0 3 3 6
28  Jamaica (JAM) 0 1 2 3
 Norway (NOR) 0 1 2 3
30  Greece (GRE) 0 1 1 2
 Nigeria (NGR) 0 1 1 2
 Puerto Rico (PUR) 0 1 1 2
33  Colombia (COL) 0 1 0 1
 Ivory Coast (CIV) 0 1 0 1
 Egypt (EGY) 0 1 0 1
 Ireland (IRL) 0 1 0 1
 Peru (PER) 0 1 0 1
 Syria (SYR) 0 1 0 1
 Thailand (THA) 0 1 0 1
40  Turkey (TUR) 0 0 3 3
 Venezuela (VEN) 0 0 3 3
42  Algeria (ALG) 0 0 2 2
43  Cameroon (CMR) 0 0 1 1
 Chinese Taipei (TPE) 0 0 1 1
 Dominican Republic (DOM) 0 0 1 1
 Iceland (ISL) 0 0 1 1
 Zambia (ZAM) 0 0 1 1
Total (47 NOCs) 226 219 243 688

References[edit]

General
  • Byron, Lee; Cox, Amanda; Ericson, Matthew (August 4, 2008). "A Map of Olympic Medals". The New York Times. Retrieved February 26, 2012. 
Specific
  1. ^ "Los Angeles 1984". Olympic.org. Retrieved February 26, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "May 8, 1984: Soviets announce boycott of 1984 Olympics". History.com. Retrieved February 26, 2012. 
  3. ^ Zinser, Lynn (July 14, 2008). "Phone Call From China Transformed ’84 Games". The New York Times. Retrieved February 26, 2012. 
  4. ^ Beashal, John; Sibson, Andy; Taylor, John (1984). AQA Sport Examined. Cheltenham, UK: Nelson Thornes. p. 334. ISBN 978-0-7487-7722-8. 
  5. ^ "Iran Announces Boycott Of the 1984 Olympics". The New York Times. August 2, 1983. Retrieved February 26, 2012. 
  6. ^ Reich, Kenneth (June 27, 1984). "Angola joins 14 nations in boycott". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 26, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b "Official Report of the Games of the XXIIIrd Olympiad Los Angeles, 1984: Volume 2 Competition Summary and Results" (PDF). LA84Foundation.org. Retrieved February 26, 2012.