1984 in the United Kingdom

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1984 in the United Kingdom:
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1982 | 1983 | 1984 (1984) | 1985 | 1986
Individual countries of the United Kingdom
England | Northern Ireland | Scotland | Wales
Sport, Television and music

Events from the year 1984 in the United Kingdom.

Incumbents[edit]

Events[edit]

January[edit]

  • 1 January — Brunei regains its independence from the United Kingdom. It became a British protectorate in 1888.
  • 3 January — The FTSE 100 Index starts.
  • 9 January — Sarah Tisdall, a 23-year-old Foreign Office clerk, is charged under the Official Secrets Act.
  • 13 January — Six people die when Britain is battered by hurricane force winds.
  • 15 January — Left-wing rebel Tony Benn wins the Labour Party's nomination for the Chesterfield by-election, eight months after losing his seat as Member of Parliament (MP) for Bristol in the General Election.[1]
  • 25 January — The government prohibits GCHQ staff from belonging to any trade union.[2]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

  • 2 April — Youth gangs run riot in Wolverhampton, looting from shops.[11]
  • 4 April — Peace protesters evicted from the Greenham Common Women's Peace Camp.[12]
  • 9 April — More than 100 pickets are arrested in violent clashes at the Creswell colliery in Derbyshire and the Babbington colliery in Nottinghamshire. It is estimated that 46 out of 176 British coal mines are currently active as miners fight government plans to close 20 coal mines across Britain.[13]
  • 12 April — Arthur Scargill, the leader of the National Union of Mineworkers, rules out a national ballot of miners on whether to continue their strike, which has already lasted five weeks.[14]
  • 15 April — The comedian Tommy Cooper, 62, collapses and dies on stage from a heart attack during a live, televised show, Live from Her Majesty's.
  • 17 April — WPC Yvonne Fletcher is shot and killed by a secluded gunman during a siege outside the Libyan Embassy in London in the event known as the 1984 Libyan Embassy Siege. 11 other people are also shot but survive.[15]
  • 22 April — In the wake of Yvonne Fletcher's death, Britain severs diplomatic relations with Libya and serves warning on its seven remaining Libyan diplomats to return to their homeland.
  • 25 April — Austin Rover launches its new Montego four-door saloon, which replaces the outdated Morris Ital and competes head-to-head with the Ford Sierra and Vauxhall Cavalier. The demise of the Ital coincides with the demise of the 72-year-old Morris marque, as the restructuring of Austin Rover will result in the discontinuation of several less popular marques as well as a less extensive model range.
  • 27 April — 30 Libyan diplomats leave Britain.

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

  • 1 October — David Jenkins, Bishop of Durham, launches an attack on Mrs Thatcher's social policies. The Durham area has been particularly hard hit by factory and mine closures since her election as prime minister five years ago.
  • 3 October — Plans to expand the Urban Enterprise Zone in Dudley, West Midlands, are approved; developers Don and Roy Richardson get the go-ahead to build a retail park and shopping mall on the main part of the site. The first tenants will move to the site next year and the development is expected in the next 18 months, with scope for further service sector developments in the future.[33]
  • 5 October — Police in Essex make the largest cannabis seizure in British criminal history when a multi-million pound stash of the drug is found on a schooner moored on the River Crouch near North Fambridge village.[34]
  • 10 October — The High Court fines the NUM £200,000 and Arthur Scargill £1,000 for contempt of court.
  • 12 October — The Provisional Irish Republican Army attempts to assassinate the Conservative cabinet in the Brighton hotel bombing. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher escapes injury, but Norman Tebbit is trapped among the rubble and his wife Margaret is seriously injured. Five people, including MP Anthony Berry, are killed.[35]
  • 13 October — Darts player John Lowe achieves the first televised nine dart finish.[22]
  • 16 October
    • There is good news for state-owned car maker Austin Rover. On the day that a facelifted version of the top selling Austin Metro, now available as a five-door as well as a three-door, is launched, it is announced that sales for September have increased by 39% over the same period last year. The pre-facelift Metro was Britain's best selling car last month, while the mid-range Maestro (launched 18 months ago) was the second best seller ahead of its key rival the Ford Escort, and the six-month-old Austin Montego was the fifth best seller ahead of the Ford Sierra.[36]
    • The Bill, a police TV drama, airs for the first time on ITV. It debuted last year as a pilot show Wooden Top.[37]
  • 18 October — Support for the Conservative government is reported to be improving after several months of dismal poll showings, with the latest MORI poll putting them nine points ahead of Labour on 44%.[38]
  • 23 October — BBC News newsreader Michael Buerk gives powerful commentary of the famine in Ethiopia which has already claimed thousands of lives and reportedly has the potential claim the lives of many as 7 million more people. Numerous British charities including Oxfam and Save the Children begin collection work to aid the famine victims, who are mostly encamped near the town of Korem.

November[edit]

  • 5 November — 800 miners end their strike and return to work.
  • 12 November — The English one pound note is withdrawn after 150 years in circulation.[39]
  • 15 November — The General Synod of the Church of England support the ordination of women as deacons, but not as full priests.[2]
  • 19 November — The number of working miners increases to around 62,000 when nearly 3,000 striking miners return to work.
  • 20 November — British Telecom shares go on sale in the biggest share issue ever.[11] Two million people (5% of the adult population) buy shares, almost doubling the number of share owners in Britain.[40]
  • 23 November — The Oxford Circus fire traps around 1,000 passengers on the London Underground but no-one is killed.[41]
  • 25 November — 36 of Britain and Ireland's top pop musicians gather in a Notting Hill studio to form Band Aid and record the song "Do They Know It's Christmas" in order to raise money for famine relief in Ethiopia.
  • 28 November — The British Telecom share offer closes.
  • 29 November — The Band Aid charity single goes on sale.
  • 30 November
    • Tension in the miners' strike increases when two South Wales miners are charged with the murder of taxi driver David Wilkie, 35, who died when a concrete block was dropped on his car from a road bridge. The passenger in his car, who escaped with minor injuries, was a miner who had defied the strike and continued going to work.
    • The British and French governments announce their intention to seek private promoters for the construction of the Channel Tunnel in order to build and operate it without public funding. The tunnel, for which proposals were first made as long ago as 1802, is expected to be open in the early 1990s.[42]

December[edit]

Undated[edit]

  • Chatham Dockyard in Medway is closed after being used a shipbuilding yard for over 400 years since the reign of Henry VIII.
  • The Morris and Triumph car brands are discontinued. The last Morris car, the Ital, is replaced by the more modern Austin Montego. The Triumph Acclaim's successor is the Rover 200.
  • Vauxhall have a successful year in the motor industry. It reported that its market share has doubled since 1981, and the year ended on an even bigger high when its MK2 Astra range was elected European Car of the Year.
  • Despite unemployment reaching a peak of nearly 3.3million this year, inflation is still low at 5%.[52]
  • Youth unemployment (covering the 16-24 age range) stands at a record 1,200,000 - more than a third of the total unemployment count.[53]

Publications[edit]

In fiction[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1984: Benn back on road to Westminster". BBC News. 15 January 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 449–450. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2. 
  3. ^ http://www.itnsource.com/shotlist//ITN/1984/02/01/124590/?s=Nissan+car+factory
  4. ^ MRP - Triumph cars
  5. ^ The Glasgow Herald - Google News Archive Search
  6. ^ "1984: British ice couple score Olympic gold". BBC News. 14 February 1984. Archived from the original on 31 January 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  7. ^ a b "Poll tracker: Interactive guide to the opinion polls". BBC News. 29 September 2009. 
  8. ^ "1984: Miners strike over threatened pit closures". BBC News. 12 March 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  9. ^ "1984: Sinn Féin leader shot in street attack". BBC News. 14 March 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  10. ^ "1984: EEC summit collapses over rebate row". BBC News. 21 March 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  11. ^ a b Express & Star
  12. ^ "1984: Greenham Common women evicted". BBC News. 4 April 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  13. ^ "1984: Dozens arrested in picket line violence". BBC News. 9 April 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  14. ^ "1984: Scargill vetoes national ballot on strike". BBC News. 12 April 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  15. ^ "1984: Libyan embassy shots kill policewoman". BBC News. 17 April 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  16. ^ "Liverpool Daily Post.co.uk — Everton FC — Everton FC News — FA Cup Final 1984: Everton make Elton John sing the Blues". Archived from the original on 7 October 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-04. 
  17. ^ "Birmingham International Airport History - 1980s – 2000". Archived from the original on 7 October 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-04. 
  18. ^ "LIVERWEB — European Cup Winners 1984 - Liverpool". Archived from the original on 7 October 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-04. 
  19. ^ Jamieson, Alastair (9 August 1984). "Unemployment 'will reach 3m by Christmas'". The Daily Telegraph (London). Retrieved 2012-10-19. 
  20. ^ The European Elections in 1984 | European Parliament Information Office in the United Kingdom
  21. ^ "1984: O-Levels to be replaced by GCSEs". BBC News. 20 June 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  22. ^ a b c Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN 0-14-102715-0. 
  23. ^ Baker, Michael H. C. (1997). London Transport since 1963. Shepperton: Ian Allan. ISBN 0-7110-2481-2. 
  24. ^ "1984: Historic York Minster engulfed by flames". BBC News. 9 July 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  25. ^ "Llŷn Peninsula Earthquake Macroseismic". Retrieved 2008-05-23. 
  26. ^ "1984: Euro Court condemns phone-tapping". BBC News. 2 August 1984. Archived from the original on 1 January 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  27. ^ "1984: Zola Budd in race trip controversy". BBC News. 11 August 1984. Archived from the original on 23 January 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  28. ^ "1984: DeLorean cleared of drugs charges". BBC News. 16 August 1984. Archived from the original on 5 June 2009. Retrieved 29 May 2009. 
  29. ^ The Glasgow Herald - Google News Archive Search
  30. ^ "1984: Epidemic 'spreads to second hospital'". BBC News. 7 September 1984. 
  31. ^ http://www.itnsource.com/shotlist//ITN/1984/09/24/127727/?s=Wednesbury
  32. ^ "1984: UK and China agree Hong Kong handover". BBC News. 26 September 1984. Archived from the original on 3 January 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  33. ^ CA37600 - IBA: enterprise zones: list of enterprise zones
  34. ^ "1984: Essex police make record drugs haul". BBC News. 5 October 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  35. ^ "1984: Tory Cabinet in Brighton bomb blast". BBC News. 12 October 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  36. ^ Hunston, Hugh (16 October 1984). "Metro adds to its range as it goes to top of sales league". Glasgow Herald. p. 11. Retrieved 2012-10-19. 
  37. ^ "The Bill". tv.com. Retrieved 2012-10-19. 
  38. ^ Ipsos MORI | Trend | Voting Intention in Great Britain: 1976-present
  39. ^ "1984: Quid notes out — pound coins in". BBC News. 12 November 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  40. ^ Marr, Andrew (2007). A History of Modern Britain. London: Macmillan. pp. 430–1. ISBN 978-1-4050-0538-8. 
  41. ^ "1984: London tube fire traps hundreds". BBC News. 23 November 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  42. ^ http://web.archive.org/web/20120722224731/http://www.eurotunnelgroup.com/uk/the-channel-tunnel/history/
  43. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 1984". Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  44. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1984". Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  45. ^ "Rafaels and Stefans pictures". Archived from the original on 7 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-25. 
  46. ^ "1984: Court fines Scargill for obstruction". BBC News. 14 December 1984. Archived from the original on 20 June 2009. Retrieved 29 May 2009. 
  47. ^ "1984: Gorbachev visit to Britain a 'success'". BBC News. 16 December 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  48. ^ "1984: Britain signs over Hong Kong to China". BBC News. 19 December 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  49. ^ Howard, Philip (1984-12-20). "'True poet' Ted Hughes is Laureate". The Times (62017). p. 1. 
  50. ^ "Announcement of the christening of Lady Louise Windsor". The British Monarchy. The Royal Household. 8 April 2004. Retrieved 2011-01-21. 
  51. ^ "The 1980s". Number Ones. Retrieved 2013-04-02. 
  52. ^ WebCite query result
  53. ^ Bowater, Donna (16 November 2011). "Youth unemployment reaches 1986 levels". The Daily Telegraph (London). Retrieved 2011-11-16. 
  54. ^ Watson, Adam; Clement, R. D. (1983). "Aberdeenshire Gaelic". Transactions of the Gaelic Society of Inverness 52: 373–404. 

See also[edit]