1985–86 Georgetown Hoyas men's basketball team

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1985–86 Georgetown Hoyas men's basketball
Georgetown Hoyas alternate logo.svg
NCAA Tournament, Second Round
Conference Big East
Ranking
Coaches #15
AP #13
1985–86 record 24-8 (11-5 Big East)
Head coach John Thompson, Jr. (14th year)
Assistant coach Craig Esherick (4th year)
Assistant coach Mike Riley (4th year)
Captain Ralph Dalton (1st year)
Captain Michael Jackson (1st year)
Home arena Capital Centre
Seasons
« 1984–85 1986–87 »
1985–86 Big East men's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
#4 St. John's 14 2   .875     31 5   .861
#9 Syracuse 14 2   .875     26 6   .813
#13 Georgetown 11 5   .688     24 8   .750
Villanova 10 6   .625     23 14   .622
Providence 7 9   .438     17 14   .548
Pittsburgh 6 10   .375     15 14   .517
Boston College 4 12   .250     13 15   .464
Connecticut 3 13   .188     12 16   .429
Seton Hall 3 13   .188     14 18   .438
† 1986 Big East Tournament winner
As of March 31, 1986[1]; Rankings from AP Poll

The 1985–86 Georgetown Hoyas men's basketball team represented Georgetown University in the 1985–86 NCAA Division I basketball season. John Thompson, Jr., coached them in his 14th season as head coach. They played their home games at the Capital Centre in Landover, Maryland. They were members of the Big East Conference and finished the season with a record of 24-8, 11-5 in Big East play. They advanced to the 1986 Big East Men's Basketball Tournament semifinals before losing to Syracuse and to the second round of the 1986 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament before losing to Michigan State. They were ranked No. 13 in the season '​s final Associated Press Poll and No. 15 in the final Coaches' Poll.

Season recap[edit]

By the mid-1980s, slow-down games in which weaker teams attempted to control the ball for long stretches without shooting as a way of evening their odds against larger and faster teams had become common enough in men '​ college basketball to prompt the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) to adopt a shot clock in men '​ basketball this season to force a return to quicker and higher-scoring play. Initially a 45-second clock, it would be reduced to 35 seconds in the 1993-94 season.[2]

The new shot clock was not the only major change that the 1985-86 Hoyas faced: They also played the first season of the post-Patrick Ewing era at Georgetown, and the graduation of the dominant center – as well as of forward Bill Martin – in May 1985 required adjustments by a team that had become accustomed to Ewing '​s stellar offensive and defensive performances.

Junior forward Reggie Williams and senior forward David Wingate were the team '​s top scoring threats, combining to lead the Hoyas in scoring in 28 of the season '​s 32 games. Williams scored in double figures in 31 games, including 30 points against 18th-ranked DePaul, 25 points against 10th-ranked St. John's, 22 points and 14 rebounds in Georgetown '​s first meeting with Villanova, and 26 points and 12 rebounds in the second game against Villanova. He shot 53% from the field and led his team with 17.6 points per game.[3] Wingate, who had played much of his first two seasons at guard but moved to small forward this year, played nearly 1,000 minutes without ever fouling out, and tied his career high with 26 points against Pittsburgh in the last home game of his Georgetown career. He finished the year second to Williams in scoring, averaging 15.9 points per game.[4]

Senior guard Horace Broadnax had seen limited playing time as a reserve and scored in double figures in a combined 18 games during the previous three seasons, but Wingate '​s move to forward this season allowed him to become a starter for the first time. As such, he had his best season as a Hoya, with 13 points in 17 minutes against Providence, 16 points against seventh-ranked Louisiana State, 15 points against Connecticut, and 17 points against Boston College. Although he averaged only 20 minutes per game, he was fourth in both scoring and assists for the season, and averaged 7.5 points per game.[5]

Senior guard and team co-captain Michael Jackson provided leadership to the team all season. During the final ten games of the regular season, he averaged 11 points and 6.4 assists a game and shot a perfect 30-for-30 from the free-throw line as Georgetown won seven of the games and lost the other three by a combined total of only five points. Overall, he shot 50% from the field and 81% from the free-throw line during the season and had 200 assists. He finished his collegiate career as the leader in Georgetown history in assists, with 671.[6]

Freshman guard Charles Smith joined the team this season. He had a season-high 11 points against Seton Hall, but saw limited playing time, averaging eight minutes and 3.0 points per game. He would emerge late the following season as one of Georgetown '​s top players.[7] Freshman forward Jaren Jackson was another newcomer. Limited to reserve duty, he came off the bench to lead the team in scoring in three games, but scored half his 102 points for the season in those three games, averaging only 3.2 points per game for the year. His breakout season would come in his junior year.[6]

Sophomore guard Perry McDonald was hobbled by a back injury all season and averaged only 3.4 points per game. Like Smith, he would begin to make his mark as one of the Hoya greats the following year.[8]

The Hoyas '​ record earned them a bye in the first round of the 1986 Big East Men's Basketball Tournament. In the quarterfinals, they squeaked past Pittsburgh with a one-point win in which Wingate '​s defense was key to pulling out the victory.[4] They thus advanced to the tournament semifinals, where they lost to Syracuse.

Georgetown was the No. 4 seed in the Midwest Region of the 1986 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament – the eighth of 14 consecutive Georgetown NCAA Tournament appearances – and defeated Texas Tech in the first round to advance to the second round, in which the Hoyas met the Midwest Region '​s No. 5 seed, Michigan State. Although he had nine of Georgetown '​ 17 assists, Michael Jackson shot only 1-for-7 (14.3%) from the field while Michigan State senior guard Scott Skiles scored 24 points to lead the Spartans to an 80-68 upset win and bring the Hoyas '​ season to an end.[6]

David Wingate graduated in May 1986 as the third-highest scorer in Georgetown history, having been the runner-up in scoring in each of his four seasons on the team. During his four years, Georgetown had posted a record of 115-24 (.827), and during the final three years of his collegiate career the Hoyas had lost a combined total of only four home games.[4]

The 1985-86 Hoyas were ranked No. 13 in the season '​s final Associated Press Poll and No. 15 in the final Coaches' Poll.

Roster[edit]

Source[3][4][5][6][7]<refname="jarenjackson"/>[8][9][10]

# Name Height Weight (lbs.) Position Class Hometown Previous Team(s)
4 Bobby Winston 6'5" N/A G/F Fr. Washington, DC, U.S. All Saints HS
10 Perry McDonald 6'4" 190 F/G So. New Orleans, LA, U.S. George Washington Carver Senior HS
13 Charles Smith 6'0" 160 G Fr. Washington, DC, U.S. All Saints HS
21 Jaren Jackson 6'2" 190 F Fr. New Orleans, LA, U.S. Walter L. Cohen HS
30 Michael Jackson 6'2" 175 G Sr. Reston, VA, U.S. South Lakes HS
32 Horace Broadnax 6'0" 190 G Sr. Plant City, FL, U.S. Plant City HS
34 Reggie Williams 6'7" 190 F Jr. Baltimore, MD, U.S. Paul Laurence Dunbar HS
40 David Wingate 6'5" 185 F Sr. Baltimore, MD, U.S. Paul Laurence Dunbar HS
42 Johnathan Edwards 6'8" N/A F Fr. New Orleans, LA, U.S. O. Perry Walker HS
44 Ronnie Highsmith 6'8" N/A F So. Robersonville, NC, U.S. United States Army
51 Grady Mateen 6'11" N/A C So. Akron, OH, U.S. Central-Hower HS
52 Ralph Dalton 6'9" N/A C Grad. Stud. Suitland, MD, U.S. Fishburne Military School (Va.)
55 Victor Morris 6'9" N/A F Jr. Houston, TX, U.S. Kashmere HS

Rankings[edit]

Source[11][12]

Ranking Movement
Legend: ██ Improvement in ranking. ██ Decrease in ranking. ██ Not ranked the previous week. RV=Others receiving votes.
Poll Pre Wk 1 Wk 2 Wk 3 Wk 4 Wk 5 Wk 6 Wk 7 Wk 8 Wk 9 Wk 10 Wk 11 Wk 12 Wk 13 Wk 14 Wk 15 Final
AP 8 8 6 5 5 5 11 13 15 12 12 11 9 13 15 14 13
Coaches 8 [note 1] 7 7 6 7 11 15 16 12 12 11 11 13 15 15 15

1985–86 Schedule and results[edit]

Sources[13][14][15][16][17][18]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance Record
Regular Season
Sat., Nov. 23, 1985* at Hawaii Loa #8 Kailua GymnasiumKailua, HI W 100-51  823 1–0
Wed., Nov. 27, 1985* at Hawaii-Hilo #8 Civic AuditoriumHilo, HI W 91-57  2,900 2–0
Tue., Dec. 3, 1985* at George Mason #6 Patriot CenterFairfax, VA W 75-63  8,188 3–0
Fri., Dec. 6, 1985* at Grambling State #6 Civic CenterMonroe, LA W 77-30  3,294 4–0
Wed., Dec. 11, 1985* New Mexico #5 Capital CentreLandover, MD W 76–51  5,616 5–0
Sat., Dec. 14, 1985* Florida A&M #5 Capital Centre • Landover, MD W 86–56  5,331 6–0
Wed., Dec. 18, 1985* American #5 Capital Centre • Landover, MD W 83–59  5,179 7–0
Sat., Dec. 21, 1985* at #18 DePaul #5 Rosemont HorizonRosemont, IL W 85-70  N/A 8–0
Mon., Dec. 23, 1985* Seattle #5 Capital Centre • Landover, MD W 96–57  5,023 9–0
Fri., Dec. 27, 1985* at Texas-El Paso #5 Special Events CenterEl Paso, TX L 64-78  12,222 9–1
Thu., Jan. 2, 1986 at Pittsburgh #11 Civic ArenaPittsburgh, PA L 76-80  16,046 9–2 (0–1)
Sat., Jan. 4, 1986 Providence #11 Capital Centre • Landover, MD W 110–79  6,869 10–2 (1–1)
Wed., Jan. 8, 1986 Connecticut #13 Capital Centre • Landover, MD W 70–66  6,171 11–2 (2–1)
Sat., Jan. 11, 1986 at #10 St. John's #13 Madison Square GardenNew York, NY L 74–79  19,591 11–3 (2–2)
Wed., Jan. 15, 1986 #4 Syracuse #15 Capital Centre • Landover, MD W 73–70  18,164 12–3 (3–2)
Sat., Jan. 18, 1986 at Seton Hall #15 Brendan Byrne ArenaEast Rutherford, NJ W 82–72  6,712 13–3 (4–2)
Mon., Jan 20, 1986 Villanova #15 Capital Centre • Landover, MD W 76–72  11,541 14–3 (5–2)
Mon., Jan. 25, 1986 at Boston College #12 Boston GardenBoston, MA W 73–66  14,218 15–3 (6–2)
Mon., Jan. 27, 1986 at Providence #12 Providence Civic CenterProvidence, RI W 69–54  10,561 16–3 (7–2)
Sun., Feb. 2, 1986* #17 Louisiana State #12 Capital Centre • Landover, MD W 74–72 OT 11,367 17-3
Wed., Feb. 5, 1986 at Connecticut #11 Hartford Civic CenterHartford, CT W 80–63  13,838 18–3 (8–2)
Sat., Feb. 8, 1986 Seton Hall #11 Capital Centre • Landover, MD W 81–54  6,276 19-3 (9–2)
Mon., Feb. 10, 1986 #10 St. John's #11 Capital Centre • Landover, MD L 58–60  16,093 19–4 (9–3)
Fri., Feb. 15, 1986 at Villanova #9 SpectrumPhiladelphia, PA L 88–90 2OT 17,764 19–5 (9–4)
Tue., Feb 18, 1986* at Morgan State #13 Baltimore ArenaBaltimore, MD W 81–53  6,023 20–5
Sun., Feb. 23, 1986 at #9 Syracuse #13 Carrier DomeSyracuse, NY L 63–64  32,475 20–6 (9–5)
Wed., Feb. 26, 1986 Boston College #15 Capital Centre • Landover, MD W 90–76  8,693 21–6 (10–5)
Tue., Mar. 4, 1986 Pittsburgh #14 Capital Centre • Landover, MD W 93–62  10,742 22–6 (11–5)
Big East Tournament
Thu., Mar. 6, 1986 vs. Pittsburgh #14 Madison Square Garden • New York, NY
(Quarterfinal)
W 57–56  19,591 23–6
Fri., Mar. 7, 1986 vs. #8 Syracuse #14 Madison Square Garden • New York, NY
(Semifinal)
L 73–75 OT 19,591 23–7
NCAA Tournament
Wed., Mar. 12, 1986 vs. Texas Tech #13 University of Dayton ArenaDayton, OH
(Midwest Region First Round)
W 70–64  11,260 24–7
Fri., Mar. 14, 1986 vs. #18 Michigan State #13 University of Dayton Arena • Dayton, OH
(Midwest Region Second Round)
L 68–80  11,260 24–8
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ No Coaches' Poll this week.

References[edit]