1985–89 North Indian Ocean cyclone seasons

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The years from 1985-1989 featured the 1985–1989 North Indian Ocean cyclone seasons. Each season was an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. The North Indian tropical cyclone season has no bounds, but they tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean.

1985 North Indian Ocean cyclone season[edit]

Tropical Storm One (1B)[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration May 22 – May 25
Peak intensity 110 km/h (70 mph) (1-min)  979 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm One, which developed in the central Bay of Bengal on May 22, strengthened to a peak of 70 mph winds before hitting Bangladesh on the 25th. The storm brought torrential rains and flooding, killing around 11,069 people[1] and leaving hundreds of thousands homeless. Advanced warning likely cut back on what could have been a much higher death toll.

Tropical Storm Two (2A)[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration May 28 – June 1
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (1-min)  987 mbar (hPa)

A tropical depression formed in the central Arabian Sea on May 28. It headed northward, reaching a peak of 60 mph winds before hitting western India on the 31st. The storm dissipated on the 1st.

Tropical Storm Three (3B)[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration October 8 – October 11
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (1-min)  988 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Three, which developed in the central Bay of Bengal, moved northwestward to hit India on the 11th as a 60 mph storm.

Tropical Storm Four (4B)[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration October 15 – October 16
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (1-min)  987 mbar (hPa)

38 people were killed when 60 mph Tropical Storm Four hit the northeastern coast of India on October 16.

Tropical Storm Five (5B)[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration November 13 – November 18
Peak intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (1-min)  983 mbar (hPa)

On November 17, 65 mph Tropical Storm Five, which developed on the 13th, hit eastern India. The storm brought heavy flooding, but no damage or deaths were reported.

Tropical Storm Six (6B)[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration December 9 – December 14
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (1-min)  987 mbar (hPa)

50 mph Tropical Storm Six, having developed on December 9, hit southeastern India on the 13th.

1986 North Indian Ocean cyclone season[edit]

Tropical Storm One (1B)[edit]

Map showing the sequential path of the storm; the colored points indicate the storm's position and intensity at six-hour intervals.

Tropical Depression 1B developed southeast of Sri Lanka on January 7. It tracked northwestward, briefly strengthening to a 50 mph tropical storm before upper level winds caused it to dissipate on the 11th.

Tropical Storm Two (2B)[edit]

Map showing the sequential path of the storm; the colored points indicate the storm's position and intensity at six-hour intervals.

A tropical disturbance slowly organized into a tropical depression on November 6 in the Bay of Bengal. It turned to the northeast, became a tropical storm, and reached a peak of 60 mph winds before hitting Bangladesh on the 9th. The storm dissipated on the 10th, after causing 11 casualties and heavy damage.

Tropical Storm Three (3A)[edit]

Map showing the sequential path of the storm; the colored points indicate the storm's position and intensity at six-hour intervals.

From November 9 to the 11th, Tropical Storm Three existed over the open Arabian Sea, dissipating due to vertical shear.

1987 North Indian Ocean cyclone season[edit]

Prior to 1992, this season had the most tropical storms in North Indian recorded history, with 8 storms forming.

Tropical Storm One (1B)[edit]

Map showing the sequential path of the storm; the colored points indicate the storm's position and intensity at six-hour intervals.

Tropical Storm One, which developed in the central Bay of Bengal on January 30, turned to the north and reached a peak of 65 mph winds on the 2nd. Vertical shear weakened it to a tropical depression before it hit northern Myanmar on the 4th.

Tropical Storm Two (2B)[edit]

Map showing the sequential path of the storm; the colored points indicate the storm's position and intensity at six-hour intervals.

On June 4 65 mph Tropical Storm Two hit Bangladesh, causing little damage or loss of life.

Tropical Storm Three (3A)[edit]

Map showing the sequential path of the storm; the colored points indicate the storm's position and intensity at six-hour intervals.

The monsoon trough spawned a tropical depression on June 4 in the Arabian Sea. It tracked due eastward, becoming a tropical storm later that day and reaching a peak of 60 mph winds on the 6th. The storm turned abruptly northward, turned westward and executed an anticyclonic loop. Vertical shear caused the system to dissipate on the 12th.

Tropical Storm Four (4B)[edit]

Map showing the sequential path of the storm; the colored points indicate the storm's position and intensity at six-hour intervals.

A monsoon depression became more tropical on October 14 in the Bay of Bengal. It traveled northwestward, becoming a tropical storm on the 15th and hitting southeastern India as a 50 mph storm that night. It rapidly dissipated over land.

Tropical Storm Five (5B)[edit]

Map showing the sequential path of the storm; the colored points indicate the storm's position and intensity at six-hour intervals.

65 mph Tropical Storm Five, which developed on October 30 in the Bay of Bengal, hit eastern India on the 2nd, dissipating shortly thereafter.

Tropical Storm Six (6B)[edit]

Map showing the sequential path of the storm; the colored points indicate the storm's position and intensity at six-hour intervals.

The monsoon trough spawned a tropical depression on November 8 in the southeastern Bay of Bengal. It tracked northward, then turned westward, strengthening to a 60 mph tropical storm before hitting eastern India on the 12th.

Tropical Storm Seven (7A)[edit]

Map showing the sequential path of the storm; the colored points indicate the storm's position and intensity at six-hour intervals.

Tropical Storm Seven, which developed in the western Bay of Bengal on December 2, strengthened in the eastern Arabian Sea to a 50 mph storm. It turned to the northeast, where upper level winds weakened it to a tropical depression. The depression hit western India, 90 miles south of Bombay, on the 12th, and dissipated the next day without causing any damage.

Tropical Storm Eight (8B)[edit]

Map showing the sequential path of the storm; the colored points indicate the storm's position and intensity at six-hour intervals.

The eighth and final storm of the season formed on December 17 northeast of Sri Lanka. It moved westward, and executed an elongated loop lasting 4 days. It briefly reached tropical storm strength before vertical shear weakened it again, and the system hit eastern India on the 23rd.

1988 North Indian Ocean cyclone season[edit]

Tropical Storm One (1A)[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration June 8 – June 12
Peak intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (1-min)  996 mbar (hPa)

A tropical depression that formed on June 8 off the western coast of India tracked westward, becoming a tropical storm on the 9th. It looped to the north, where upper level winds ripped it apart on the 12th.

Tropical Storm Two (2B)[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration October 17 – October 19
Peak intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (1-min)  997 mbar (hPa)

A tropical disturbance in the eastern Bay of Bengal developed into a tropical depression on October 17. It moved northwestward, briefly becoming a tropical storm before upper level winds weakened it. The storm hit Bangladesh as a tropical depression on the 19th, but still managed to cause strong storm surge and flooding amounting to 1500 casualties.

Tropical Storm Three (3B)[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration November 14 – November 18
Peak intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (1-min)  984 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm Three, which formed in the southern Bay of Bengal on November 14, tracked northward to reach a peak of 65 mph winds before hitting Myanmar on the 18th. The storm rapidly dissipated over land.

Cyclone Four (4B)[edit]

Category 3 tropical cyclone (SSHS)
Duration November 21 – November 30
Peak intensity 205 km/h (125 mph) (1-min)  933 mbar (hPa)

The monsoon trough spawned a tropical depression just west of the Malay Peninsula on November 21. Its large circulation caused mudslides and flooding over western Indonesia before consolidating into a tropical storm on the 24th over the central Bay of Bengal. The storm turned northward, where conditions allowed for continued development. The storm became a cyclone on the 26th, and it continued to strengthen as it moved northward. Cyclone Four reached a peak of 130 mph just before hitting the Sundarbans part of Bangladesh. Heavy storm surge and torrential flooding killed 2000 people (with 6000 missing), and left millions homeless. In addition, the storm caused 1000 fatalities and over 100,000 homeless in Malaysia, Thailand, and western Indonesia.

Tropical Storm Five (5B)[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration December 6 – December 8
Peak intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (1-min)  991 mbar (hPa)

From December 6 through the 8th, a tropical storm meandered through the central Bay of Bengal, remaining at sea through its lifetime.

1989 North Indian Ocean cyclone season[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Natural catastrophes and man-made disasters in 2008: North America and Asia suffer heavy losses". Swiss Reinsurance Company Ltd. 21 January 2009. p. 38. Retrieved 2 January 2014. 

External links[edit]