1985 World Ice Hockey Championships

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1985 World Ice Hockey Championships
Tournament details
Host country  Czechoslovakia
Dates 17 April – 3 May
Teams 8
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg  Czechoslovakia (6th title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg  Canada
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg  Soviet Union
Fourth place  United States
Tournament statistics
Matches played 40
Goals scored 305 (7.63 per match)
Attendance 411,659 (10,291 per match)
Scoring leader(s) Soviet Union Sergei Makarov 14 points
1983
1986

The 1985 Ice Hockey World Championships took place in Prague, Czechoslovakia from 17 April to 3 May. Eight teams took part, with each team playing each other once. The four best teams then played each other once more with no results carrying over, and the other four teams played each other again to determine ranking and relegation. This was the 50th World Championships, and also the 61st European Championships of ice hockey. The home side, Czechoslovakia, became world champions for the 6th time, and the Soviet Union won their 23rd European title. For the European Championship, only games between European sides in the first round are included.

This was a historic tournament in a few respects. The Soviets were playing without goaltender Tretiak for the first time since 1969. This was Canada's best finish since returning to the Championships in 1977, and after defeating the Soviet Union for the first time in the World Championships since 1961, they played for gold on the last day. Despite Canada's silver medal, the first round saw a professionally stocked Canada lose to the Americans for the first time. Perhaps the most surprising aspect of the tournament was Sweden's poor play. After finishing second in the 1984 Canada Cup expectations were high, but they had their worst finish since 1937, playing in the relegation pool for the first time.[1][2] It would also be East Germany's final appearance at the top level.

The tournament finished on a sour note when the US and Soviet Union faced off against each other for the bronze medal. Several fights broke out, resulting in suspensions of coaches Viktor Tikhonov and David Peterson, as well as players Irek Gimayev, Vyacheslav Fetisov and Tim Thomas.[1] Additionally referee Kjell Lind was disciplined for failing to keep control of the game.

World Championship Group A (Czechoslovakia)[edit]

First Round[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Goal difference Points
1  Soviet Union 7 7 0 0 52 - 08 14
2  United States 7 4 1 2 24 - 34 9
3  Canada 7 4 1 2 33 - 23 9
4  Czechoslovakia 7 4 1 2 30 - 16 9
5  Finland 7 2 2 3 23 - 25 6
6  Sweden 7 2 0 5 24 - 30 4
7  West Germany 7 1 1 5 17 - 31 3
8  East Germany 7 0 2 5 11 - 47 2
17 April Canada  9-1
 East Germany
17 April Soviet Union  11-1
 United States
17 April Sweden  3-2
 West Germany
17 April Czechoslovakia  5-0
 Finland
18 April Canada  5-0
 West Germany
18 April Soviet Union  5-1
 Finland
18 April United States  4-3
 Sweden
18 April Czechoslovakia  6-1
 East Germany
20 April United States  4-3
 Canada
20 April Soviet Union  6-0
 East Germany
20 April Czechoslovakia  6-1
 West Germany
20 April Finland  5-0
 Sweden
21 April Canada  5-2
 Finland
21 April Sweden  11-0
 East Germany
21 April Soviet Union  10-2
 West Germany
21 April United States  3-1
 Czechoslovakia
23 April Canada  4-4
 Czechoslovakia
23 April Soviet Union  6-2
 Sweden
23 April United States  4-3
 West Germany
23 April Finland  4-4
 East Germany
24 April United States  5-5
 East Germany
24 April Finland  3-3
 West Germany
25 April Czechoslovakia  7-2
 Sweden
25 April Soviet Union  9-1
 Canada
26 April Finland  8-3
 United States
26 April West Germany  6-0
 East Germany
27 April Canada  6-3
 Sweden
27 April Soviet Union  5-1
 Czechoslovakia

Final Round[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  Czechoslovakia 3 3 0 0 18 - 06 6
2  Canada 3 2 0 1 09 - 08 4
3  Soviet Union 3 1 0 2 12 - 08 2
4  United States 3 0 0 3 07 - 24 0
29 April Canada  3-2
 United States
29 April Czechoslovakia  2-1
 Soviet Union
1 May Canada  3-1
 Soviet Union
1 May Czechoslovakia  11-2
 United States
3 May Czechoslovakia  5-3
 Canada
3 May Soviet Union  10-3
 United States

Consolation Round[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
5  Finland 10 4 2 4 39 - 33 10
6  Sweden 10 4 0 6 37 - 40 8
7  West Germany 10 3 1 6 28 - 41 7
8  East Germany 10 0 2 8 16 - 64 2

East Germany were relegated to Group B.

28 April Finland  6-2
 East Germany
28 April Sweden  5-2
 West Germany
30 April Sweden  7-2
 East Germany
30 April West Germany  5-4
 Finland
2 May Finland  6-1
 Sweden
2 May West Germany  4-1
 East Germany

World Championship Group B (Switzerland)[edit]

Played in Fribourg March 21–31. In the final game, the Swiss had to win by more than four to win the tournament. While the margin was attainable, the unpredictable Dutch side shocked the home crowd beating them six to two.

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
9  Poland 7 6 1 0 37 - 13 13
10  Switzerland 7 5 1 1 29 - 13 11
11  Italy 7 5 0 2 29 - 22 10
12  Austria 7 3 0 4 18 - 24 6
13  Japan 7 3 0 4 31 - 36 6
14  Netherlands 7 3 0 4 36 - 25 6
15  Norway 7 2 0 5 28 - 38 4
16  Hungary 7 0 0 7 17 - 54 0

Poland was promoted to Group A, and both Norway and Hungary were relegated to Group C.

21 March Poland  7-1
 Italy
21 March Switzerland  9-1
 Hungary
22 March Italy  5-2
 Netherlands
22 March Norway  5-8
 Japan
22 March Hungary  0-2
 Austria
23 March Netherlands  3-4
 Poland
23 March Norway  1-2
 Switzerland
24 March Hungary  3-5
 Poland
24 March Switzerland  4-1
 Japan
24 March Austria  1-4
 Italy
25 March Japan  4-3
 Netherlands
25 March Austria  2-5
 Norway
26 March Hungary  1-6
 Italy
26 March Poland  2-2
 Switzerland
27 March Austria  8-3
 Japan
27 March Netherlands  8-2
 Norway
28 March Italy  6-4
 Japan
28 March Netherlands  12-4
 Hungary
28 March Poland  6-4
 Norway
28 March Switzerland  5-1
 Austria
30 March Austria  4-2
 Netherlands
30 March Poland  8-0
 Japan
30 March Norway  9-6
 Hungary
30 March Switzerland  5-1
 Italy
31 March Hungary  2-11
 Japan
31 March Norway  2-6
 Italy
31 March Poland  5-0
 Austria
31 March Switzerland  2-6
 Netherlands

World Championship Group C (France)[edit]

Played in Megève, Chamonix and Saint-Gervais March 14–23.

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
17  France 7 6 1 0 54 - 13 13
18  Yugoslavia 7 6 0 1 36 - 13 12
19  China 7 5 1 1 45 - 22 11
20  Romania 7 4 0 3 51 - 29 8
21  Denmark 7 3 0 4 16 - 23 6
22  Bulgaria 7 2 0 5 27 - 45 4
23  North Korea 7 1 0 6 18 - 56 2
24  Spain 7 0 0 7 09 - 55 0

France and Yugoslavia were both promoted to Group B. For France this was their first return to this level since they boycotted in protest in 1972[3]

14 March France  12-1
 Spain
14 March Romania  11-3
 Bulgaria
14 March China  3-7
 Yugoslavia
14 March North Korea  1-3
 Denmark
15 March Denmark  1-0
 Spain
15 March France  4-4
 China
15 March Yugoslavia  5-2
 Romania
15 March Bulgaria  8-1
 North Korea
17 March France  12-0
 North Korea
17 March Yugoslavia  4-3
 Denmark
17 March Romania  8-2
 Spain
17 March China  10-4
 Bulgaria
18 March North Korea  5-18
 Romania
18 March France  2-1
 Yugoslavia
18 March Denmark  1-6
 China
18 March Bulgaria  9-3
 Spain
20 March Bulgaria  0-4
 Yugoslavia
20 March France  6-2
 Denmark
20 March North Korea  8-1
 Spain
20 March Romania  4-6
 China
22 March China  6-1
 North Korea
22 March France  10-2
 Bulgaria
22 March Romania  5-0
 Denmark
22 March Yugoslavia  7-1
 Spain
23 March France  8-3
 Romania
23 March China  10-1
 Spain
23 March Yugoslavia  8-2
 North Korea
23 March Denmark  6-1
 Bulgaria

Ranking and statistics[edit]

 


 1985 IIHF World Championship Winners 

Czechoslovakia
6th title

Tournament Awards[edit]

Final standings[edit]

The final standings of the tournament according to IIHF:

Gold medal icon.svg  Czechoslovakia
Silver medal icon.svg  Canada
Bronze medal icon.svg  Soviet Union
4  United States
5  Finland
6  Sweden
7  West Germany
8  East Germany

European championships final standings[edit]

The final standings of the European championships according to IIHF:

Gold medal icon.svg  Soviet Union
Silver medal icon.svg  Czechoslovakia
Bronze medal icon.svg  Finland
4  Sweden
5  West Germany
6  East Germany

Scoring leaders[edit]

List shows the top skaters sorted by points, then goals.

Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM POS
Soviet Union Sergei Makarov 10 9 5 14 +2 8 F
Czechoslovakia Jiří Lála 10 8 5 13 +9 6 F
Soviet Union Viacheslav Fetisov 10 6 7 13 +19 15 D
Soviet Union Nikolai Drozdetsky 10 5 7 12 +17 4 F
Finland Hannu Järvenpää 10 9 2 11 +4 10 F
Czechoslovakia Vladimír Růžička 10 8 3 11 +5 0 F
Sweden Kent Nilsson 8 6 5 11 −1 6 F
Soviet Union Mikhail Varnakov 10 6 4 10 +17 0 F
Soviet Union Alexei Kasatonov 9 5 5 10 +13 14 D
West Germany Dieter Hegen 10 5 5 10 0 4 F

Source: [1]

Leading goaltenders[edit]

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played 50% of their team's minutes are included in this list.

Player MIP GA GAA SVS% SO
Soviet Union Vladimir Myshkin 580 13 1.34 .936 1
Czechoslovakia Jiří Králík 540 17 1.89 .922 1
Finland Kari Takko 420 23 3.29 .891 1
West Germany Karl Friesen 520 34 3.92 .886 0
United States John Vanbiesbrouck 489 46 5.64 .866 0

Source: [2]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Group A summary
  2. ^ Duplacey page 507
  3. ^ Group C

References[edit]

  • Complete results
  • Duplacey, James (1998). Total Hockey: The official encyclopedia of the National Hockey League. Total Sports. pp. 498–528. ISBN 0-8362-7114-9. 
  • Podnieks, Andrew (2010). IIHF Media Guide & Record Book 2011. Moydart Press. pp. 150–1. 
See also: World Juniors