1986–87 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team

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1986–87 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball
A blue block M with maize-colored borders and the word Michigan across the middle.
Conference Big Ten Conference
1986–87 record 20–12 (10–8 Big Ten)
Head coach Bill Frieder
Assistant coach Mike Boyd
Assistant coach Steve Fisher
Assistant coach David Hammer
MVP Gary Grant
Captain Gary Grant
Captain Antoine Joubert
Home arena Crisler Arena
Seasons
« 1985–86 1987–88 »
1986–87 Big Ten Conference men's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
#3 Indiana 15 3   .833     30 4   .882
#7 Purdue 15 3   .833     25 5   .833
#6 Iowa 14 4   .778     30 5   .857
#11 Illinois 13 5   .722     23 8   .742
Michigan 10 8   .556     20 12   .625
Ohio State 9 9   .500     20 13   .606
Michigan State 6 12   .333     11 17   .393
Wisconsin 4 14   .222     14 17   .452
Minnesota 2 16   .111     9 19   .321
Northwestern 2 16   .111     7 21   .250
Rankings from AP Poll)

The 1986–87 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team represented the University of Michigan in intercollegiate college basketball during the 1986–87 season. The team played its home games in the Crisler Arena in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and was a member of the Big Ten Conference. Under the direction of head coach Bill Frieder, the team finished fifth in the Big Ten Conference.[1] The team earned the number nine seed in the 1987 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament where it advanced one round before losing.[2] The team was unranked all season in the Associated Press Top Twenty Poll.[3] and it also ended the season unranked in the final UPI Coaches' Poll.[4] Gary Grant and Antoine Joubert served as team co-captains and Grant earned team MVP.[5]

On March 12, 1987, Garde Thompson set the Big Ten Conference single-game record for three-point field goals made with 9 against Navy. The record was unsurpassed until February 23, 2003.[6] Thompson's performance continues to be the school record.[7] Grant led the conference with a 2.67 steals average in conference games for the season.[8] The team led the conference with an 86.7 points per game scoring average.[9] Additionally, the team led the conference with a total of 89 three-point field goals made in 18 conference games.[10] That season Thompson also set the current Michigan record for career three-point field goal percentage (48.08) as well as a single-game three-point field goal percentage record of 88.9% (8-for-9) against the UIC Flames on December 6, 1986 that would last until February 25, 1989.[7] That night the team made 12 of 16 to set the team single-game three-point field goal percentage record, that stood until February 3, 1988 and that season the team shot 43.2% on its three-point shots which lasted two years as a school single-season record.[7]

The team set a new school record by totaling 2821 points over the course of the season, surpassing the record of 2753 set in 1976. The record would be rebroken each of the following two seasons.[11] For the third of five consecutive seasons, the team set the school record for single-season field goal percentage with a 52.4% (1139-for-2175) performance.[12] Antoine Joubert's 539 career assists surpassed Eric Turner's 1984 total to set a school record that Gary Grant eclipsed the following season.[13] For the first of three consecutive seasons, the team set the school single-season total assist record with a total of 652, surpassing the 1976 total of 600.[13] Gary Grant's single-season steals total of 86 and average of 2.69 surpassed his own school records set the prior year and remain school records.[14]

The team set the current school record for single-game field goal percentage on December 30, 1986 against Alaska–Anchorage Seawolves with a 69.2% (45–65) performance, surpassing the 66.2% mark set on February 23, 1978.[12] The team also set a school single-season free throw percentage record of 75.0% that would last until 1999, surpassing the 74.8% set in 1986.[15] On February 21, 1987 against Northwestern, the team set the school single-game free throw percentage record by making all fifteen of its free throws, which has only been outdone by the March 2, 2002 16-for-16 performance.[15] The team set the school single-game assists record of 33 on March 7, 1987 against Purdue, surpassing the February 23, 1974 total of 32. This was surpassed twice the following December.[13] Joubert's career total of 3960 minutes surpassed Mike McGee's school record total of 3941. Gary Grant would break the record the following season.[16] Joubert ended his career with 127 games played and 115 games started, which surpassed Richard Rellford's 1986 school record of 124 games and Mike McGee's record of 112 starts. Gary Grant would surpass the record the following season.[16]

In the 64-team NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, number nine seeded Michigan advanced one round by defeating the eight-seeded Navy 97–82. In the second round the team was defeated by top-seeded North Carolina 109–97.[2] Grant became the first Wolverine to post a triple double on against North Carolina with 24 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists.[17]

Team players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Seven players from this team were selected in the NBA Draft.[18][19][20][21]

Year Round Pick Overall Player NBA Club
1987 6 20 134 Antoine Joubert Detroit Pistons
1988 1 15 15 Gary Grant Seattle SuperSonics
1989 1 4 4 Glen Rice Miami Heat
1990 1 10 10 Rumeal Robinson Atlanta Hawks
1990 1 13 13 Loy Vaught Los Angeles Clippers
1990 1 16 16 Terry Mills Milwaukee Bucks

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009–10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 68. Retrieved 2010-09-03. 
  2. ^ a b "NCAA Tournament History". University of Michigan. 2010. p. 3. 
  3. ^ "Division I Records". National Collegiate Athletic Association. pp. 68–83. Retrieved 2010-08-28. 
  4. ^ "Division I Records". National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 87. Retrieved 2010-08-28. 
  5. ^ "All-Time Accolades". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. pp. 9–10. 
  6. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009–10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 26. Retrieved 2010-09-08. 
  7. ^ a b c "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 12. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  8. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009–10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 35. Retrieved 2010-09-08. 
  9. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009–10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 36. Retrieved 2010-09-08. 
  10. ^ "Big Ten Basketball 2009–10 Media Guide". CBS Interactive. p. 37. Retrieved 2010-09-08. 
  11. ^ "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 2. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  12. ^ a b "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 10. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  13. ^ a b c "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 16. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  14. ^ "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 18. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  15. ^ a b "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 14. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  16. ^ a b "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 20. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  17. ^ "All-Time Records". MGoBlue.com. CBS Interactive. p. 17. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  18. ^ "1987 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  19. ^ "1988 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  20. ^ "1989 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  21. ^ "1990 NBA Draft". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved 2014-04-25.