1986–87 NHL season

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1986–87 NHL season
League National Hockey League
Sport Ice hockey
Duration October 9, 1986 – May 31, 1987
Number of games 80
Number of teams 21
Regular season
Season champions Edmonton Oilers
Season MVP Wayne Gretzky, (Edmonton)
Top scorer Wayne Gretzky, (Edmonton)
Playoffs
Playoffs MVP Ron Hextall, (Philadelphia)
Stanley Cup
Champions Edmonton Oilers
  Runners-up Philadelphia Flyers
NHL seasons

The 1986–87 NHL season was the 70th season of the National Hockey League. The Edmonton Oilers won the Stanley Cup by beating the Philadelphia Flyers four games to three in the Cup finals.

League business[edit]

The Chicago-based club officially changed their name from the two-worded "Black Hawks" to the one-worded "Blackhawks" based on the spelling found in their original franchise documents.[1]

Regular season[edit]

The Oilers won their second straight Presidents' Trophy as the top team and Wayne Gretzky won his eighth straight Hart Trophy and his seventh straight Art Ross Trophy.[2]

On November 26, 1986, Toronto's Borje Salming was accidentally cut in the face by a skate, requiring more than 200 stitches. It was the third injury to his face and Salming returned to play wearing a visor.[3]

On April 4, 1987, the Islanders' Denis Potvin became the first NHL defenceman to reach 1000 points. A shot by the Islanders' Mikko Makela deflected in off Potvin's arm in a 6–6 shootout between the Islanders and Sabres.[4]

Final standings[edit]

Note: W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, GF= Goals For, GA = Goals Against, Pts = Points, PIM = Penalties in minutes

Prince of Wales Conference[edit]

Adams Division
GP W L T GF GA PTS
Hartford Whalers 80 43 30 7 287 270 93
Montreal Canadiens 80 41 29 10 277 241 92
Boston Bruins 80 39 34 7 301 276 85
Quebec Nordiques 80 31 39 10 267 276 72
Buffalo Sabres 80 28 44 8 280 308 64

[5]

Patrick Division
  GP W L T GF GA PTS
Philadelphia Flyers 80 46 26 8 310 245 100
Washington Capitals 80 38 32 10 285 278 86
New York Islanders 80 35 33 12 279 281 82
New York Rangers 80 34 38 8 307 323 76
Pittsburgh Penguins 80 30 38 12 297 290 72
New Jersey Devils 80 29 45 6 293 368 64

[5]

Clarence Campbell Conference[edit]

Norris Division
GP W L T GF GA Pts
St. Louis Blues 80 32 33 15 281 293 79
Detroit Red Wings 80 34 36 10 260 274 78
Chicago Blackhawks 80 29 37 14 290 310 72
Toronto Maple Leafs 80 32 42 6 286 319 70
Minnesota North Stars 80 30 40 10 296 314 70

[5]


Smythe Division
GP W L T GF GA PTS
Edmonton Oilers 80 50 24 6 372 284 106
Calgary Flames 80 46 31 3 318 289 95
Winnipeg Jets 80 40 32 8 279 271 88
Los Angeles Kings 80 31 41 8 318 341 70
Vancouver Canucks 80 29 43 8 282 314 66

[5]

  1. ^ Diamond, Dan (1991). The Official National Hockey League 75th anniversary commemorative book. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart. pp. 291. ISBN 0-7710-6727-5
  2. ^ Hughes et al. Duplacey, p. 483.
  3. ^ Hughes et al. Duplacey, p. 485.
  4. ^ Hughes et al. Duplacey, p. 482.
  5. ^ a b c d Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2011). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book 2012. Dan Diamond & Associates. p. 153. ISBN 9781894801225. 

Playoffs[edit]

Note: all dates in 1987

In attempts to reduce the number of first round upsets, the NHL expanded the best-of-five series in the first round to a best-of-seven series.

The game seven opening round game between the Washington Capitals and New York Islanders went four overtimes, and is known as the Easter Epic.

The 1987 playoffs marked the second of only three times that all four former WHA teams made the playoffs in the same year. It happened the previous year and it would not happen again until 1999 by which time 3 of those teams had moved, the Quebec Nordiques to Denver, the Winnipeg Jets to Phoenix, and the Hartford Whalers to Raleigh, North Carolina.

The Quebec Nordiques made the playoffs and defeated the Hartford Whalers in the first round. The next playoff series they would win would be in 1996, their first year as the Colorado Avalanche.

Final[edit]

Edmonton Oilers Vs. Philadelphia Flyers

Further information: 1987 Stanley Cup Finals

The Oilers and Flyers would meet again in the final for the second time in three years. This time, Edmonton was the regular season champion with 50 wins and 106 points, and Philadelphia was second with 46 wins and 100 points. Unlike the 1985 final, this series would go the full seven games. Edmonton took the first two games at home, then split in Philadelphia. However, the Flyers won the next two games, one in Edmonton and one back in Philadelphia by one goal, to force a deciding seventh game. Edmonton won game seven to earn its third Stanley Cup in four seasons.

Date Away Score Home Score Notes
May 17 Philadelphia 2 Edmonton 4
May 20 Philadelphia 2 Edmonton 3 (OT)
May 22 Edmonton 3 Philadelphia 5
May 24 Edmonton 4 Philadelphia 1
May 26 Philadelphia 4 Edmonton 3
May 28 Edmonton 2 Philadelphia 3
May 31 Philadelphia 1 Edmonton 3

Edmonton wins best-of-seven series 4–3

Playoff bracket[edit]

Division Semi-finals Division Finals Conference Finals Final
                       
A1 Hartford 2
A4 Quebec 4
A2 Montreal 4
A4 Quebec 3
A2 Montreal 4
A3 Boston 0
A2 Montreal 2
P1 Philadelphia 4
P1 Philadelphia 4
P4 NY Rangers 2
P1 Philadelphia 4
P3 NY Islanders 3
P2 Washington 3
P3 NY Islanders 4
P1 Philadelphia 3
S1 Edmonton 4
N1 St. Louis 2
N4 Toronto 4
N4 Toronto 3
N2 Detroit 4
N2 Detroit 4
N3 Chicago 0
N2 Detroit 1
S1 Edmonton 4
S1 Edmonton 4
S4 Los Angeles 1
S1 Edmonton 4
S3 Winnipeg 0
S2 Calgary 2
S3 Winnipeg 4

Awards[edit]

1987 NHL awards
Presidents' Trophy:
Team with most points, regular season
Edmonton Oilers
Prince of Wales Trophy:
(Wales Conference playoff champion)
Philadelphia Flyers
Clarence S. Campbell Bowl:
(Campbell Conference playoff champion)
Edmonton Oilers
Art Ross Trophy:
(Top scorer, regular season)
Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers
Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy:
(Perseverance, sportsmanship, and dedication)
Doug Jarvis, Hartford Whalers
Calder Memorial Trophy:
(Best first-year player)
Luc Robitaille, Los Angeles Kings
Conn Smythe Trophy:
(Most valuable player, playoffs)
Ron Hextall, Philadelphia Flyers
Frank J. Selke Trophy:
(Best defensive forward)
Dave Poulin, Philadelphia Flyers
Hart Memorial Trophy:
(Most valuable player, regular season)
Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers
Jack Adams Award:
(Best coach)
Jacques Demers, Detroit Red Wings
James Norris Memorial Trophy:
(Best defenceman)
Ray Bourque, Boston Bruins
Lady Byng Memorial Trophy:
(Excellence and sportsmanship)
Joe Mullen, Calgary Flames
Lester B. Pearson Award:
(Outstanding player, regular season)
Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers
NHL Plus/Minus Award:
(Player with best plus/minus record)
Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers
William M. Jennings Trophy:
(Goaltender(s) of team(s) with best goaltending record)
Patrick Roy/Brian Hayward, Montreal Canadiens
Vezina Trophy:
(Best goaltender)
Ron Hextall, Philadelphia Flyers
Lester Patrick Trophy:
(Service to hockey in the U.S.)
Hobey Baker, Frank Mathers

All-Star teams[edit]

First Team   Position   Second Team
Ron Hextall, Philadelphia Flyers G Mike Liut, Hartford Whalers
Ray Bourque, Boston Bruins D Larry Murphy, Washington Capitals
Mark Howe, Philadelphia Flyers D Al MacInnis, Calgary Flames
Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers C Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins
Jari Kurri, Edmonton Oilers RW Tim Kerr, Philadelphia Flyers
Michel Goulet, Quebec Nordiques LW Luc Robitaille, Los Angeles Kings

Source: NHL[1]

Player statistics[edit]

Scoring leaders[edit]

Note: GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points, PIM = Penalties in minutes, PPG = Powerplay Goals, SHG = Shorthanded Goals, GWG = Game Winning Goals

Player Team GP G A Pts PIM +/- PPG SHG GWG
Wayne Gretzky Edmonton Oilers 79 62 121 183 28 +70 13 7 4
Jari Kurri Edmonton Oilers 79 54 54 108 41 +35 12 5 10
Mario Lemieux Pittsburgh Penguins 63 54 53 107 57 +13 19 0 4
Mark Messier Edmonton Oilers 77 37 70 107 73 +21 7 4 5
Doug Gilmour St. Louis Blues 80 42 63 105 58 -2 17 1 2
Dino Ciccarelli Minnesota North Stars 80 52 51 103 88 +10 22 0 5
Dale Hawerchuk Winnipeg Jets 80 47 53 100 52 +3 10 0 4
Michel Goulet Quebec Nordiques 75 49 47 96 61 -12 17 0 6
Tim Kerr Philadelphia Flyers 75 58 37 95 57 +38 26 0 10
Ray Bourque Boston Bruins 78 23 72 95 36 +44 6 1 3

Source: NHL.[2]

Leading goaltenders[edit]

Minimum 2000 min. GP = Games played; Min = Minutes played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; SO = Shutouts; GAA = Goals against average; Sv% = Save percentage[3]

Goalie Team GP Min W L T SO GAA Sv%
Brian Hayward Montreal Canadiens 37 2178 19 13 4 1 2.81 .894
Patrick Roy Montreal Canadiens 46 2686 22 16 6 1 2.94 .892
Ron Hextall Philadelphia Flyers 66 3799 37 21 6 1 3.00 .902
Pete Peeters Washington Capitals 37 2002 17 11 4 0 3.21 .885
Mike Liut Hartford Whalers 59 3476 31 22 5 4 3.23 .885
Eldon Reddick Winnipeg Jets 48 2762 21 21 4 0 3.24 .881
Bob Mason Washington Capitals 45 2536 20 18 5 0 3.24 .890
Kelly Hrudey New York Islanders 46 2634 25 15 7 0 3.30 .881
Bill Ranford Boston Bruins 41 2231 16 20 2 3 3.33 .891
Clint Malarchuk Quebec Nordiques 54 3092 18 26 9 1 3.40 .884

Debuts[edit]

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NHL game in 1986–87 (listed with their first team, asterisk(*) marks debut in playoffs):

Last games[edit]

The following is a list of players of note that played their last game in the NHL in 1986–87 (listed with their last team):

1987 Trading Deadline[edit]

  • Trading Deadline: MARCH 10, 1987 [4]
  • March 10, 1987: Paul Boutilier traded from Boston to Minnesota for Minnesota's fourth round choice in 1988 Entry Draft.
  • March 10, 1987: Raimo Helminen traded from NY Rangers to Minnesota for future considerations.
  • March 10, 1987: Raimo Summanen traded from Edmonton to Vancouver for Moe Lemay.
  • March 10, 1987: Stu Kulak traded from Edmonton to NY Rangers, completing an earlier trade.
  • March 10, 1987: Marcel Dionne, Jeff Crossman and Los Angeles' third round choice in 1989 Entry Draft traded from Los Angeles to NY Rangers for Bob Carpenter and Tom Laidlaw.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (2008). Total Stanley Cup 2008. NHL. 
  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (2000). Total Hockey. Kingston, NY: Total Sports. ISBN 1-892129-85-X. 
  • Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2011). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book 2012. Toronto, ON: Dan Diamond & Associates. ISBN 978-1-894801-22-5. 
  • Dryden, Steve, ed. (2000). Century of hockey. Toronto, ON: McClelland & Stewart Ltd. ISBN 0-7710-4179-9. 
  • Fischler, Stan; Fischler, Shirley; Hughes, Morgan; Romain, Joseph; Duplacey, James (2003). The Hockey Chronicle: Year-by-Year History of the National Hockey League. Lincolnwood, IL: Publications International Inc. ISBN 0-7853-9624-1. 
Notes
  1. ^ Dinger 2011, p. 229.
  2. ^ Dinger 2011, p. 153.
  3. ^ NHL Leading Goaltenders During 1986-87 Season | QuantHockey.com
  4. ^ NHL trade deadline: Deals since 1980 | Habs Inside/Out

External links[edit]