1986 Houston Astros season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1986 Houston Astros
1986 National League West Champions
Major League affiliations
Location
Results
Record 96–66 (.593)
Divisional place 1st
Other information
Owner(s) John McMullen
General manager(s) Dick Wagner
Manager(s) Hal Lanier
Local television KTXH
HSE
Local radio KTRH
(Gene Elston, Milo Hamilton, Larry Dierker, Jerry Trupiano, Bill Worrell)
 < Previous season     Next season  >

Offseason[edit]

Regular season[edit]

  • Kevin Bass had a twenty game hit streak during the season.
  • Dave Smith set a club record with 33 saves in one season.
  • September 24, 1986: Jim Deshaies set a record for the most strikeouts to start a game. Deshaies started the game with 8 strikeouts versus the Los Angeles Dodgers
  • September 25, 1986: Mike Scott threw a no-hitter against the San Francisco Giants to help the Astros win the National League West. The final score was 2-0 and Scott struck out 13 Giants batters.

Scott was the first pitcher in the National League and the second overall to throw a no-hitter to clinch a pennant. The first was New York Yankees pitcher Allie Reynolds, who accomplished the feat on September 18, 1951.[2]

Opening Day starters[edit]

All-Star Game[edit]

The 1986 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 57th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 15, 1986 at the Astrodome in Houston, Texas, the home of the Astros. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 3-2.

Season standings[edit]

NL West W L GB Pct.
Houston Astros 96 66 -- .593
Cincinnati Reds 86 76 10.0 .531
San Francisco Giants 83 79 13.0 .512
San Diego Padres 74 88 22.0 .457
Los Angeles Dodgers 73 89 23.0 .451
Atlanta Braves 72 89 23.5 .447

Notable transactions[edit]

  • June 2, 1986: 1986 Major League Baseball Draft
    • Ryan Bowen was drafted by the Astros in the 1st round.[3]
    • Karl Rhodes was drafted by the Astros in the 3rd round. Player signed June 10, 1986.[4]
    • Trenidad Hubbard was drafted by the Astros in the 12th round of the 1986 amateur draft. Player signed June 16, 1986.[5]
    • Eric Anthony was drafted by the Astros in the 34th round. Player signed June 7, 1986.[6]
  • June 30, 1986: Matt Keough was signed as a free agent by the Astros.[7]

Roster[edit]

1986 Houston Astros
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats[edit]

Batting[edit]

Starters by position[edit]

Note: Pos = position; G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
1B Davis, GlennGlenn Davis 158 574 152 .265 31 101
2B Doran, BillBill Doran 145 550 152 .276 6 37
3B Walling, DennyDenny Walling 130 382 119 .312 13 58
LF Cruz, JoséJosé Cruz 141 479 133 .278 10 72
RF Bass, KevinKevin Bass 157 591 184 .311 20 79

Other batters[edit]

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Thon, DickieDickie Thon 106 278 69 .248 3 21
Bailey, MarkMark Bailey 57 153 27 .176 4 15
Walker, TonyTony Walker 84 90 20 .222 2 10
Peña, BertBert Peña 15 29 6 .207 0 2
Bullock, EricEric Bullock 6 21 1 .048 0 1

Pitching[edit]

Starting pitchers[edit]

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Knepper, BobBob Knepper 40 258 17 12 3.14 143
Scott, MikeMike Scott 37 275.1 18 10 2.22 306
Ryan, NolanNolan Ryan 30 178 12 8 3.34 194
Deshaies, JimJim Deshaies 26 144 12 5 3.25 128
Knudson, MarkMark Knudson 9 42.2 1 5 4.22 20

Other pitchers[edit]

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Hernández, MannyManny Hernández 9 27.2 2 3 3.90 9

Relief pitchers[edit]

Player G IP W L SV ERA SO
Smith, DaveDave Smith 54 56 4 7 33 2.73 46
Kerfeld, CharlieCharlie Kerfeld 61 93.2 11 2 7 2.59 77
López, AurelioAurelio López 45 78 3 3 7 3.46 44
Andersen, LarryLarry Andersen 38 64.2 2 1 1 2.78 33
DiPino, FrankFrank DiPino 41 40.1 1 3 3 3.57 27

National League Championship Series[edit]

Game 1[edit]

October 8 (Astrodome, Houston, Texas)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
Houston 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 1 7 1
WP: Mike Scott (1-0)  LP: Dwight Gooden (0-1)
HR: NYM – None.; HOUGlenn Davis (1)

Game 2[edit]

October 9 (Astrodome, Houston, Texas)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 5 10 0
Houston 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 10 2
WP: Bob Ojeda (1-0)  LP: Nolan Ryan (0-1)
HR: NYM – None.; HOU – None.

Game 3[edit]

October 11 (Shea Stadium, Flushing, New York)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Houston 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 8 1
New York 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 2 6 10 1
WP: Jesse Orosco (1-0)  LP: Dave Smith (0-1)
HR: HOUBill Doran (1); NYMDarryl Strawberry (1), Lenny Dykstra (1)

Game 4[edit]

October 12 (Shea Stadium, Flushing, New York)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Houston 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 4 1
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 3 0
WP: Mike Scott (2-0)  LP: Sid Fernandez (0-1)
HR: HOUAlan Ashby (1), Dickie Thon (1); NYM – None.

Game 5[edit]

October 14 (Shea Stadium, Flushing, New York)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 R H E
Houston 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 1
New York 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 4 0
WP: Jesse Orosco (2-0)  LP: Charlie Kerfeld (0-1)
HRs: HOU – None. NYMDarryl Strawberry (2)

Game 6[edit]

October 15 (Astrodome, Houston, Texas)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 R H E
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 7 11 0
Houston 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 6 11 1
WP: Jesse Orosco (3-0)  LP: Aurelio López (0-1)
HRs: NYM – None. HOUBilly Hatcher (1)

Game 6 was one for the ages, in more ways than one. The game went 16 innings with the Mets coming out on top 7-6. It was the highest scoring game of the series; in fact, the 16th inning alone featured more runs than three of the previous five games had in their entirety.

The Astrodome hosted what some consider to be one of the greatest games of all time that October and it will forever be remembered.

The big story of Game 6 was that it was most nearly a must-win for both teams. The Astros obviously had to have it because they were facing elimination. Even though they were up 3-2 in the series, the Mets regarded it as a must-win because they were scheduled to face Mike Scott again in Game 7. Scott had given up a grand total of 1 run in his first two starts of the series, and had dominated the Mets so completely that even the most optimistic Mets fans knew their chances of beating him in a potential Game 7 were small. The end result was one of the greatest Game 6 scenarios ever seen.

The Astros broke through first, and for a low scoring series like this, they broke through big, scoring three runs off a possibly tired Bob Ojeda in the bottom of the first. He settled down after that, however, and the Astros wouldn't score again for the next 12 innings. Meanwhile, Astros starter Bob Knepper was brilliant from the very first pitch, and the game headed to the 9th still 3-0.

Just when it looked like the Mets would have to face the mighty Scott, however, their bats suddenly came to life. After pitching almost perfectly for the first eight innings, Knepper clearly tired in the 9th. He allowed three hits and recorded only one out, and left with the Astros clinging to a 3-2 lead. The decision by Lanier not to bring in Smith to start the inning was talked about for years to come. Smith was their closer, but had blown a save earlier in the series. When Smith finally did appear, he was ineffective, walking two batters to load the bases and then allowing the tying run to score on a sacrifice fly by Ray Knight. In a matter of minutes, the previously raucous crowd of 45,718 had been almost completely silenced and extra innings had soon begun.

In the 14th, the Mets made their first bid to win. After Gary Carter opened with a single, a walk to Darryl Strawberry put two runners on with nobody out. After Knight forced Carter at third, Wally Backman drove a single to right. When Kevin Bass' throw to the plate sailed high over Alan Ashby's head to the screen, Strawberry scored. It looked like the end for the Astros, as Orosco came in to close them down.

With one out in the bottom of the 14th and the Houston fans with their heads in their hands, Billy Hatcher shocked everyone with a line drive home run off the left field foul pole. It was the first earned run allowed by the Mets bullpen in the entire series. Hatcher went 3 for 7 in the game, and his homer meant the Astros would be kept alive for at least one more inning. Both teams failed to score in the 15th, and the game went to the 16th inning, the most innings in playoff history at that time.

The 16th inning would be the deciding factor, and it was not an easy 16th for either pitching staff. The Mets appeared to take control of the game once again, this time coming up with 3 runs in the top half of the inning. The rally began with Strawberry receiving a gift double when Billy Hatcher and Bill Doran misplayed his towering fly ball with one out. When Knight followed with a single to right, a poor throw to the plate by Kevin Bass allowed the tiebreaking run to score, just as it had in the 14th. A walk, two wild pitches, and a single by Lenny Dykstra brought in two more runs, putting the Mets up 7-4. This sent some of the Houston faithful for the exits; those who stayed, however, almost witnessed the unthinkable.

Orosco struck out Craig Reynolds to open the inning, but a walk and two singles later, Houston had a run in and the tying run on base. Orosco induced Denny Walling to hit into a force play at second for the second out, but Glenn Davis singled home another run, bringing the Astros within a run. People everywhere were quiet as they watched Orosco face right fielder Kevin Bass with two outs and the tying run on second, and the winning run on first.

It was all up to Bass to drive in a run and tie the game. Orosco threw Bass six straight sliders; when Bass swung and missed the last of them, the epic series was over. Orosco was awarded the victory, marking the first time in postseason history a reliever won three games in a series. It would be a long winter for the Astros, but for the Mets, an even bigger trial awaited them. After taking two days off to recover from the exhausting series against Houston, the Mets began a legendary World Series against the Boston Red Sox, a series in which they would pull off one of the greatest comebacks of all time.

The Mets had won the series with a .189 batting average, the lowest average ever recorded by a winning team in a postseason series. Their pitching had been the key.

Awards and honors[edit]

  • Kevin Bass - National League Player of the Month, June
  • Mike Scott – National League Leader ERA Champion (2.22)
  • Mike Scott – National League Leader in Innings Pitched (275)
  • Mike Scott – National League Leader in Shutouts (5)
  • Mike Scott – National League Leader in Strikeouts (306)
  • Mike Scott – NLCS Most Valuable Player
  • Mike Scott - The Sporting News Pitcher of the Year, National League
  • Mike Scott - Cy Young Award, National League
  • Hal Lanier – National League Manager of the Year
  • Hal Lanier, Associated Press Manager of the Year

All-Star Game

Farm system[edit]

Level Team League Manager
AAA Tucson Toros Pacific Coast League Carlos Alfonso
AA Columbus Astros Southern League Dave Cripe, Chuck Taylor and Gary Tuck
A Osceola Astros Florida State League Tom Weidenbauer
A Asheville Tourists South Atlantic League Ken Bolek
Short-Season A Auburn Astros New York–Penn League Keith Bodie
Rookie GCL Astros Gulf Coast League Julio Linares

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Columbus

References[edit]

External links[edit]