1986 in the United Kingdom

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1986 in the United Kingdom:
Other years
1984 | 1985 | 1986 (1986) | 1987 | 1988
Individual countries of the United Kingdom
England | Northern Ireland | Scotland | Wales
Sport, Television and music

Events from the year 1986 in the United Kingdom. It is particularly noted for the "Big Bang" deregulation of the financial markets.

Incumbents[edit]

Events[edit]

January[edit]

  • January – Production of the Vauxhall Belmont compact saloon begins, giving buyers a traditional saloon alternative to the Astra hatchback and estate models.
  • 9 January
  • 12 January – Game show Catchphrase begins on ITV hosted by Roy Walker along with the computer Mr. Chips. It concludes in 2002.
  • 20 January – The United Kingdom and France announce plans to construct the Channel Tunnel, which they hope to open by the early 1990s.
  • 24 January – Leon Brittan resigns as Trade and Industry Secretary over the Westland affair.[2]
  • 31 January – Unemployment for this month has increased to 3,204,900 – a postwar high which accounts for 14.4% of the workforce.

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

  • 2 May - Liverpool win the Football League First Division title for a record 16th time after winning 1-0 at Chelsea. Kenny Dalglish, in his first season as the club's player-manager, scores the goal which gives Liverpool the title.
  • 8 May – Labour makes large gains in local council elections, collecting 37% of the votes nationally compared to the Conservatives on 34% and the Alliance on 26%. These are the first national elections to be held since the recent abolition of the metropolitan councils.
  • 10 May – The first all Merseyside FA Cup final ends in a 3–1 win for Liverpool over Everton, who become only the third team this century to win the double, having already secured the Football League First Division title.[14]
  • 21 May – The Harrison Birtwistle opera The Mask of Orpheus premiers in London.[15][16]

June[edit]

July[edit]

  • July – Nissan begins production of the Bluebird at its landmark factory near Sunderland.
  • 1 July – Gary Lineker becomes the most expensive British footballer ever in a £2.75 million move from Everton to FC Barcelona.[24]
  • 2 July – 24 hours after Gary Lineker's transfer, Ian Rush sets a new transfer record for a British footballer when he agrees a £3.2 million move from Liverpool to Juventus of Italy, but is loaned back to Liverpool for a season and will not play his first game for Juventus until at least August 1987.[25]
  • 4 July – A policeman is cleared of the manslaughter of five-year-old John Shorthouse, who was killed in an armed raid on a house in Birmingham in August last year.
  • 10 July – Austin Rover launches its new Honda-based Rover 800 executive car, which replaces the decade-old Rover SD1 and is part of a joint venture with Japanese carmaker Honda. The car will also be sold in America under the Sterling marque. The Honda version will be badged as the Honda Legend.[26][verification needed]
  • 12 July – Rioting breaks out at Portadown in Northern Ireland between Protestants and Catholics.[27]
  • 17 July – It is announced that unemployment rose to 3,220,400 in June. It has now exceeded 3 million for nearly five years.
  • 21 July – A report finds that 20% of British children are now born out of wedlock.
  • 23 July – The Prince Andrew, Duke of York, marries Sarah Ferguson at Westminster Abbey in London.[28]
  • 24 July – 2 August – The Commonwealth Games are held in Edinburgh.
  • 28 July – Estate agent Suzy Lamplugh vanishes after a meeting in London.[29]
  • 30 July – A MORI poll shows that Labour are now nine points ahead of the Conservatives with 41% of the vote, with Liberal/SDP Alliance support now at 25%.[30]

August[edit]

  • 8 August – Rival gangs of Manchester United and West Ham United fans clash on a Sealink ferry bound for Amsterdam where the two clubs are playing pre-season friendlies. The UEFA ban on English clubs in European competitions is continuing for a second season, and there are now fears that English clubs may not even be able to play friendlies overseas.
  • 13 August – The Eurotunnel Group is formed to operate the Channel Tunnel.[3]
  • 15 August – The latest MORI poll shows that the Conservatives have eliminated Labour's nine-point lead and drawn level with them by gaining 37% in the latest opinion poll, in the space of just over two weeks.[30]
  • 16 August – Figures released by the government reveal that a record of nearly 3,100,000 people claimed unemployment benefit last month, although the official total of unemployed people in Britain is still short of the record of nearly 3,300,000 which was set two years ago.[31]
  • 19 August – The Privatisation of the National Bus Company begins with the first sale of a bus operating subsidiary, Devon General, in a management buyout.
  • 22 August – John Stalker, deputy chief constable of Greater Manchester police, is cleared of misconduct over allegations of associating with criminals.[32]
  • 25 August – Economists warn that a global recession is imminent, barely five years after the previous recession.
  • 29 August – Britain's oldest twins, May and Marjorie Chavasse, celebrate their 100th birthday.[33]

September[edit]

  • September – GCSE examination courses replace both GCE 'O' Level and CSE courses for 14-year olds.[34]
  • 6 September – First episode of medical drama serial Casualty airs on BBC One. It will still be running on television more than twenty five years later.
  • 8 September – Margaret Thatcher officially opens the first phase of the Nissan car factory at Sunderland, which has been in use for two months. It is the first car factory to be built in Europe by a Japanese car maker.[35]
  • 14 September – Fears of another recession in Britain are eased by economists at Liverpool University predicting 3.1% economic growth next year.
  • 18 September – It is announced that unemployment rose to 3,280,106 in July.
  • 19 September – Two people are killed and 100 injured at the Colwich rail crash.[36]
  • 24 September – The floatation of the Trustee Savings Banks attracts a record of the more than 4 million applications for shares.

October[edit]

November[edit]

  • November - Launch of the second generation Vauxhall Carlton, largest model in the Vauxhall range. It will be sold as the Opel Omega on the continent, and all European versions of the car will be built in West Germany.
  • 3 November – The Conservatives top a MORI poll for the first time this year, coming one point ahead of Labour with 40% of the vote. Liberal/SDP Alliance support has slumped to 18%.[30]
  • 6 November
  • 7 November – Sir James Goldsmith's £5 billion bid for the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company is rejected.[23]
  • 13 November – It is announced that unemployment fell by 96,000 in October.
  • 18 November – Ian Brady and Myra Hindley, who are both still behind bars some 20 years after their Moors Murders convictions, confess to the murders of two missing children. They admit their responsibility for the deaths of Pauline Reade, who vanished in July 1963 at the age of 16, and Keith Bennett, who was last seen in June 1964 at the age of 12. Police had suspected that the pair were among the Moors Murders victims soon after beginning their investigation on the arrest of Brady and Hindley in October 1965, but did not find the bodies or indeed any evidence to be able to press charges.
  • 20 November – Police begin their search for the two newly identified Moors Murders victims.[45]
  • 21 November – The government launches a £20 million campaign to warn members of the public about the dangers of AIDS.[23]

December[edit]

  • December – The first case of Bovine spongiform encephalopathy is diagnosed in British cattle.
  • 1 December – The government launches an inquiry into financial irregularities at Guinness.[46]
  • 3 December – 4 million people apply for shares in British Gas in ancitipation of the floatation next week.
  • 4 December - 20-year-old roofer Russell Bishop is charged with the "Babes in the Wood" murders in Brighton two months ago but will be acquitted.
  • 8 December – British Gas shares are floated on the Stock Exchange. The initial public offering of 135p per share values the company at £9 billion, the highest equity offering ever at this time.[47]
  • 17 December – The world's first heart, lung and liver transplant is carried out at Papworth Hospital in Cambridgeshire.[37]
  • 18 December – It is announced that unemployment fell to a four-year low of less than 3,100,000 in November.[48]
  • 22 December – David Penhaligon, a leading Liberal Party MP, dies in a car crash near Truro in Cornwall at the age of 42.[49]
  • 25 December – The highest audience of all time for a British television drama is attracted by the Christmas Day episode of EastEnders, the BBC 1 soap opera, in which Den Watts (Leslie Grantham) serves the divorce papers on his wife Angie (Anita Dobson) after discovering that she had feigned a terminal illness to try to stop him from leaving her in an episode aired in October this year. More than 30 million viewers tune in for the episode of the TV series which first went on air in February 1985.[50]
  • 29 December - Harold Macmillan, Earl of Stockton and former prime minister, dies at the age of 92 at his home, Birch Grove in East Sussex.

Undated[edit]

Publications[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1986: Heseltine quits over Westland". BBC News. 9 January 1986. Archived from the original on 30 December 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  2. ^ "1986: Leon Brittan quits over Westland". BBC News. 24 January 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  3. ^ a b [1][dead link]
  4. ^ a b Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 452–453. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2. 
  5. ^ "1986: Printers and police clash in Wapping". BBC News. 15 February 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  6. ^ "Sun Headlines". Retrieved 2013-02-26. 
  7. ^ "1986: Greater London Council abolished". BBC News. 31 March 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  8. ^ "History – The Hanson years". Imperial Tobacco. 2010. Retrieved 2010-09-23. 
  9. ^ Tedmanson, Sophie (3 November 2004). "Lord Hanson". The Times (London). Retrieved 2010-09-23. 
  10. ^ "1986: Sinclair sells computer business". BBC News. 7 April 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  11. ^ "metrocentre". Retrieved 2013-03-15. 
  12. ^ "1986: Simple funeral rites for Duchess". BBC News. 29 April 1986. Archived from the original on 30 December 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  13. ^ Jail action called off after riots, Express & Star (Wolverhampton), 1 May 1986, retrieved 2013-03-15 
  14. ^ "FA Cup Final 1986". Archived from the original on 1 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-30. 
  15. ^ a b The Hutchinson Factfinder. Helicon. 1999. ISBN 1-85986-000-1. 
  16. ^ "The Mask of Orpheus". What's On Stage. Retrieved 6 July 2010. 
  17. ^ "1986: Magee convicted of Brighton bombing". BBC News. 10 June 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  18. ^ "1986: Labour expels Militant Hatton". BBC News. 12 June 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  19. ^ Jan Alsos. "1986 - Story of Mexico '86". Planet World Cup. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  20. ^ "1986: Ian Paisley's battle cry condemned". BBC News. 24 June 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  21. ^ "1986: Branson on course for Blue Riband", BBC News". 26 June 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  22. ^ "1986: Branson beats Atlantic speed record". BBC News. 29 June 1986. Archived from the original on 4 January 2008. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  23. ^ a b c "1986". Wolverhampton: Express & Star. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  24. ^ TV and Radio (12 June 2002). "A career of two halves". London: Telegraph. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  25. ^ "Ian Rush | Football Stats | No Club | Age 51 | 1979–1999". Soccer Base. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  26. ^ http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=Bw5BAAAAIBAJ&sjid=4aYMAAAAIBAJ&pg=5628,2109104&dq=rover-800&hl=en
  27. ^ "1986: Orange Parade sparks riots". BBC News. 12 July 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  28. ^ "1986: Prince Andrew weds Sarah Ferguson". BBC News. 23 July 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  29. ^ "1986: Parents appeal for missing agent". BBC News. 30 July 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  30. ^ a b c "Poll tracker: Interactive guide to the opinion polls". BBC News. 1970-01-01. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  31. ^ Ashley Seager (2006-08-16). "20 years ago the dole queue hit 3 million - today it is the workforce that's a record | Business". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  32. ^ "1986: Police chief cleared of misconduct". BBC News. 22 August 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  33. ^ "1986: UK's oldest twins turn 100". BBC News. 29 August 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  34. ^ "1984: O-Levels to be replaced by GCSEs". BBC News. 20 June 1984. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-29. 
  35. ^ "Nissan Sunderland". Qashqai Club. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  36. ^ "1986: Two dead in Midlands rail crash". BBC News. 19 September 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  37. ^ a b c Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN 0-14-102715-0. 
  38. ^ "Metro Centre". Thechaiseguesthouse.com. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  39. ^ "The highs and lows of M&S". Daily Mail (London). Retrieved 2011-08-01. 
  40. ^ "1986: UK cuts links with Syria over bomb plot". BBC News. 24 October 1986. Archived from the original on 26 October 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  41. ^ "1986: Archer quits over prostitute allegations". BBC News. 26 October 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  42. ^ "1986: 'Evil' Bamber jailed for family murders". BBC News. 28 October 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  43. ^ "The M25: We're on the road to nowhere - Features - Motoring". London: The Independent. 2006-10-17. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  44. ^ "1986: Oil workers die in helicopter crash". BBC News. 6 November 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  45. ^ "1986: Police renew hunt for Moors victims". BBC News. 20 November 1986. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  46. ^ "1986: Surprise inquiry into Guinness affairs". BBC News. 1 December 1986. Archived from the original on 4 December 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-28. 
  47. ^ Marr, Andrew (2007). A History of Modern Britain. London: Macmillan. p. 431. ISBN 978-1-4050-0538-8. 
  48. ^ [2]
  49. ^ Polsson, Ken. "This Day in History - December 22". Retrieved 2013-02-26. 
  50. ^ Revoir, Paul (7 October 2008). "The most watched TV shows of all time – and they are all old programmes". Daily Mail (London). Retrieved 2011-03-03. 
  51. ^ [3][dead link]
  52. ^ Thatcher, Margaret (10 October 1986). "Speech to Conservative Party Conference". Margaret Thatcher Foundation. Retrieved 2013-02-26. 

See also[edit]