1987 World Ice Hockey Championships

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1987 World Ice Hockey Championships
Tournament details
Host country  Austria
Dates 17 April – 3 May
Teams 8
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg  Sweden (4th title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg  Soviet Union
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg  Czechoslovakia
Fourth place  Canada
Tournament statistics
Matches played 40
Goals scored 282 (7.05 per match)
Attendance 205,401 (5,135 per match)
Scoring leader(s) Soviet Union Vladimir Krutov 15 points
1986
1989

The 1987 Ice Hockey World Championships was the 52nd such event hosted by the International Ice Hockey Federation. It was also the 63rd European Championships. Teams representing 28 countries participated in four levels of competition.

In the Division A Championship held 17 April to 3 May in Vienna, Austria, each team played each other once in the preliminary round. The four best placed teams then played each other once in a championship round and, unlike the relegation round, the first round of results were not counted. Sweden won the gold medal for the fourth time and the Soviet Union won their 25th European title. In the European Championships, only the games of the first round between European teams counted. Switzerland was demoted to Division B.

Sweden's victory was a controversial one. The Germans had beaten both Canada and Finland when it was revealed that forward Miroslav Sikora had played for the Polish junior team in 1977. He was suspended and the IIHF stripped West Germany of their two wins. The Germans took the matter to court, stating that they had been granted permission. Though Sikora remained suspended, the IIHF reinstated the two victories.[1] If the courts had not intervened, Finland would have replaced Sweden in the medal round.[2] Additionally, the Swedes earned the Gold over the Soviets by goal differential when the Soviets had gone undefeated and the Swedes had lost three preliminary round games. This led to further discussion of a change of format. The IIHF's account of the finale states that, "Sweden won thanks to an inflated score against Canada,"[3] however Sweden only needed to win by two (the same margin that the Czechs beat Canada by) for the Gold. In reality the Soviets had to come from behind to capture Silver and deprive the Czechs of the Gold, and the Swedes winning by more than two ensured that the Czechs could not play to a tie and capture Gold.

Promotion and relegation was effective for 1989 as the IIHF did not run a championship in Olympic years at this time. Nations that did not participate in the Calgary Olympics were invited to compete in the final Thayer Tutt Trophy.

World Championship Group A (Austria)[edit]

First round[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  Soviet Union 7 7 0 0 48–12 14
2  Czechoslovakia 7 5 1 1 24–15 11
3  Sweden 7 4 0 3 30–17 8
4  Canada 7 3 1 3 25–17 7
5  West Germany 7 3 0 4 18–28 6
6  Finland 7 3 0 4 17–24 6
7  United States 7 2 0 5 19–36 4
8  Switzerland 7 0 0 7 17–49 0
17 April Soviet Union  13–5
 Switzerland
17 April Sweden  3–0
 West Germany
17 April Finland  2–5
 Czechoslovakia
17 April Canada  3–1
 United States
18 April Finland  3–2
 Switzerland
18 April United States  2–6
 Sweden
18 April West Germany  0–7
 Soviet Union
18 April Czechoslovakia  1–1
 Canada
20 April Finland  1–3
 West Germany
20 April Soviet Union  11–2
 United States
20 April Canada  6–1
 Switzerland
20 April Sweden  2–3
 Czechoslovakia
21 April West Germany  5–3
 Canada
21 April Sweden  12–1
 Switzerland
21 April United States  2–5
 Finland
21 April Czechoslovakia  1–6
 Soviet Union
23 April Soviet Union  4–0
 Finland
23 April United States  6–4
 West Germany
23 April Switzerland  2–5
 Czechoslovakia
23 April Sweden  4–3
 Canada
24 April Finland  4–1
 Sweden
24 April Canada  2–3
 Soviet Union
25 April Switzerland  3–6
 United States
25 April West Germany  2–5
 Czechoslovakia
26 April Canada  7–2
 Finland
26 April Soviet Union  4–2
 Sweden
27 April Switzerland  3–4
 West Germany
27 April Czechoslovakia  4–2
officially 4–0 because of the positive drug test of Scott Young[2]

 United States

Final Round[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  Sweden 3 1 2 0 14–05 4
2  Soviet Union 3 1 2 0 04–03 4
3  Czechoslovakia 3 1 1 1 08–07 3
4  Canada 3 0 1 2 02–13 1
29 April Soviet Union  0–0
 Canada
29 April Czechoslovakia  3–3
 Sweden
1 May Czechoslovakia  4–2
 Canada
1 May Sweden  2–2
 Soviet Union
3 May Canada  0–9
 Sweden
3 May Soviet Union  2–1
 Czechoslovakia

Consolation Round[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
5  Finland 10 5 1 4 32–34 11
6  West Germany 10 4 1 5 31–37 9
7  United States 10 4 0 6 36–39 8
8   Switzerland 10 0 0 10 26–71 0

Switzerland was relegated to Group B.

28 April West Germany  8–1
 Switzerland
28 April Finland  6–4
 United States
30 April Finland  7–4
 Switzerland
30 April United States  6–3
 West Germany
2 May Switzerland  4–7
 United States
2 May West Germany  2–2
 Finland

World Championship Group B (Italy)[edit]

Played in Canazei 26 March to 5 April. The top three teams earned Olympic berths, and the fourth place team played off against the Group C winner to join them.[2]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
9  Poland 7 6 0 1 39–11 12
10  Norway 7 5 1 1 33–25 11
11  Austria 7 5 0 2 41–27 10
12  France 7 4 1 2 37–26 9
13  East Germany 7 2 2 3 25–31 6
14  Italy 7 2 1 4 28–30 5
15  Netherlands 7 1 1 5 30–37 3
16  China 7 0 0 7 14–60 0

Poland was promoted to Group A, and both the Netherlands and China were relegated to Group C.

26 March France  5–5
 Norway
26 March Italy  7–3
 China
27 March Austria  6–5
 France
27 March Poland  14–0
 China
27 March East Germany  6–6
 Netherlands
28 March Norway  6–2
 East Germany
28 March Italy  8–6
 Netherlands
29 March Poland  5–1
 Norway
29 March China  3–11
 Austria
29 March Italy  1–3
 France
30 March Austria  6–4
 Netherlands
30 March East Germany  2–1
 Poland
31 March China  2–4
 Norway
31 March Netherlands  3–5
 France
31 March Italy  5–5
 East Germany
1 April Poland  6–2
 France
1 April Austria  3–5
 Norway
2 April Netherlands  0–3
 Poland
2 April East Germany  5–1
 China
2 April Italy  1–4
 Austria
3 April East Germany  2–5
 France
3 April Norway  7–4
 Netherlands
4 April France  12–3
 China
4 April Poland  6–4
 Austria
4 April Italy  4–5
 Norway
5 April China  2–7
 Netherlands
5 April Austria  7–3
 East Germany
5 April Italy  2–4
 Poland

World Championship Group C (Denmark)[edit]

Played in Copenhagen, Herlev and Hørsholm 20–29 March. In addition to being promoted, the winner played off against the fourth placed Group B team for the final Olympic berth.[2]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points Tie 1
H2H Points
Tie 2
H2H Goal Dif.
17  Japan 7 5 1 1 61–13 11 2 +4
18  Denmark 7 5 1 1 47–23 11 2 0
19  Romania 7 5 1 1 48–22 11 2 −4
20  Yugoslavia 7 3 4 0 60–23 10
21  Hungary 7 3 0 4 33–28 6
22  North Korea 7 2 0 5 13–45 4
23  Bulgaria 7 1 1 5 21–40 3
24  Belgium 7 0 0 7 08–97 0

Both Japan and Denmark were promoted to Group B. On the final day, if either Romania or Yugoslavia had won, they would have been promoted, but they tied each other. Belgium was relegated to Group D, and later Romania chose to compete in Group D as well, for financial reasons.[4]

20 March Bulgaria  3–7
 Romania
20 March Japan  24–0
 Belgium
20 March Yugoslavia  6–2
 Hungary
20 March Denmark  9–1
 North Korea
21 March Japan  11–2
 Bulgaria
21 March Romania  19–1
 Belgium
22 March North Korea  2–8
 Yugoslavia
22 March Hungary  4–6
 Denmark
23 March Romania  5–3
 Japan
23 March Belgium  0–6
 Bulgaria
23 March Hungary  9–3
 North Korea
23 March Denmark  6–6
 Yugoslavia
25 March Romania  7–1
 North Korea
25 March Bulgaria  3–3
 Yugoslavia
25 March Japan  3–1
 Hungary
25 March Belgium  1–8
 Denmark
26 March Yugoslavia  5–5
 Japan
26 March Hungary  9–4
 Belgium
26 March North Korea  3–2
 Bulgaria
26 March Romania  2–8
 Denmark
28 March Romania  4–2
 Hungary
28 March Belgium  1–28
 Yugoslavia
28 March Japan  9–0
 North Korea
28 March Bulgaria  3–10
 Denmark
29 March North Korea  3–1
 Belgium
29 March Yugoslavia  4–4
 Romania
29 March Hungary  6–2
 Bulgaria
29 March Denmark  0–6
 Japan

World Championship Group D (Australia)[edit]

Played in Perth, Western Australia 13–20 March. Taiwan also played four games as exhibition contests. They lost 31–3 to Australia, 24–0 to South Korea, 12–1 to New Zealand, and tied Hong Kong 2–2.[2]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
25  Australia 6 5 1 0 177–06 11
26  South Korea 6 4 1 1 130–16 9
27  New Zealand 6 2 0 4 42–143 4
28  Hong Kong 6 0 0 6 01–185 0

Australia was promoted to Group C. Later, when Romania declined to travel to Australia for the 1989 World Ice Hockey Championships Group C for financial reasons, South Korea was promoted to take their place.[4]

13 March Australia  37–0
 Hong Kong
13 March South Korea  35–2
 New Zealand
14 March Australia  58–0
 New Zealand
14 March South Korea  44–0
 Hong Kong
15 March New Zealand  19–0
 Hong Kong
15 March Australia  7–2
 South Korea
17 March Australia  42–0
 Hong Kong
17 March South Korea  21–2
 New Zealand
18 March Australia  29–0
 New Zealand
18 March South Korea  24–1
 Hong Kong
20 March Australia  4–4
 South Korea
20 March New Zealand  19–0
 Hong Kong

Ranking and statistics[edit]

 


 1987 IIHF World Championship Winners 

Sweden
4th title

Tournament Awards[edit]

Final standings[edit]

The final standings of the tournament according to IIHF:

Gold medal icon.svg  Sweden
Silver medal icon.svg  Soviet Union
Bronze medal icon.svg  Czechoslovakia
4  Canada
5  Finland
6  West Germany
7  United States
8  Switzerland

European championships final standings[edit]

The final standings of the European championships according to IIHF:

Gold medal icon.svg  Soviet Union
Silver medal icon.svg  Czechoslovakia
Bronze medal icon.svg  Finland
4  Sweden
5  West Germany
6  Switzerland

Scoring leaders[edit]

List shows the top skaters sorted by points, then goals.

Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM POS
Soviet Union Vladimir Krutov 10 11 4 15 +15 8 F
Soviet Union Sergei Makarov 10 4 10 14 +19 8 F
Soviet Union Igor Larionov 10 4 8 12 +16 2 F
United States Aaron Broten 10 5 6 11 +6 6 F
Soviet Union Vyacheslav Bykov 10 5 6 11 +13 0 F
Sweden Bengt-Åke Gustafsson 10 3 8 11 +9 4 F
West Germany Gerd Truntschka 10 3 8 11 +6 13 F
West Germany Helmut Steiger 10 5 5 10 +2 12 F
Sweden Tomas Sandström 8 4 6 10 +11 6 F
Soviet Union Viacheslav Fetisov 10 2 8 10 +13 2 D

Source: [1]

Leading goaltenders[edit]

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played 50% of their team's minutes are included in this list.

Player MIP GA GAA SVS% SO
Soviet Union Yevgeni Belosheikin 600 15 1.50 .923 3
Czechoslovakia Dominik Hašek 520 19 2.19 .923 0
Sweden Peter Lindmark 399 14 2.11 .901 2
Finland Jarmo Myllys 464 27 3.49 .895 0
Canada Sean Burke 300 12 2.40 .895 0

Source: [2]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Duplacey page507
  2. ^ a b c d e 1987 Summary
  3. ^ IIHF.com
  4. ^ a b 1989 Summary

References[edit]

See also: World Juniors