1988–89 South Pacific cyclone season

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1988–89 South Pacific cyclone season
Season summary map
First system formed December 15, 1988
Last system dissipated May 30, 1989
Strongest storm  – (10-minute sustained)
Total depressions 14
Tropical cyclones 14
Severe tropical cyclones 6
Total fatalities Unknown
Total damage Unknown
South Pacific tropical cyclone seasons
1986–87, 1987–88, 1988–89, 1989–90, 1990–91
Related articles

The 1988–89 South Pacific cyclone season was an active tropical cyclone season with an above average number of tropical cyclones observed.

Seasonal summary[edit]

Tropical cyclone scales#Comparisons across basins

During the season despite positive values of the Southern Oscillation Index being recorded throughout the season, there was an unusual distribution of tropical cyclones with five developing between 180° and 140°W.[1] This unusual distribution of tropical cyclones was attributed to the relatively rapid development of an active South Pacific Convergence Zone over an area of cooler than normal sea surface temperatures during January and February 1989.[1]

Storms[edit]

Tropical Cyclone Eseta[edit]

Category 2 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Duration December 15 – December 25
Peak intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (10-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

On December 15, TCWC Nadi reported that a tropical depression had developed, within the monsoon trough just to the north of Vanuatu.[1][2] The system subsequently persisted for a week with little change in intensity, as it gradually moved south-southwest over Vanuatu and New Caledonia.[2] Between December 20-21, an area of high pressure developed to the south of the system, which prevented any further southwards movement.[1] The system subsequently moved north-eastwards and passed over southern Vanuatu, before TCWC Nadi reported late on December 23, that the cyclone had developed into a category 1 tropical cyclone and named it Eseta.[1][2][3] At around this time the system was located about 525 km (325 mi) to the southwest of Nadi, Fiji and had started to move south-westwards as it interacted with a trough of low pressure in the Tasman Sea.[3][4] During December 24, the system intensified further, before TCWC Nadi reported later that day that Eseta had peaked as a category 2 tropical cyclone, with 10-minute sustained wind speeds of 100 km/h (65 mph).[2][4] The system subsequently degenerated into an extratropical depression and impacting New Zealand between December 29-30.[2][5]

As a tropical depression, Eseta caused heavy rainfall within Vanuatu, however there were no reports of any damages to property or crops.[6] The system subsequently caused strong gusty winds and prolonged heavy rainfall over the Fiji Islands between December 22 – 27, with Nadi airport reporting sustained winds of 35 mph (55 km/h) and wind gusts of 58 mph (95 km/h).[2] The heavy rain lead to widespread flooding over various parts of the island nation, with minor damage to roads and crops reported.[7] The system brought heavy rain and flooding to parts of New Zealand's Northland, Auckland, Waikato and the Bay of Plenty, with flood damage to a supermarkets storeroom was estimated at NZD30 thousand, USD25 thousand.[5] Several homes were evacuate while it was thought that the heavy rain had contributed to at least 50 injuries with seven of those in a weather-related car accident.[5]

Tropical Cyclone Delilah[edit]

Category 2 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration January 1 – January 8
Peak intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (10-min)  975 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Cyclone Fili[edit]

Category 2 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Clockwise vortex
Duration January 1 – January 8
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (10-min)  985 mbar (hPa)

On January 1, TCWC Nadi reported that a shallow and ill defined tropical depression, had developed about 400 km (250 mi) to the east of the Samoan Islands.[1] Over the next few days the depression moved towards the southwest, while gradually developing further, before slightly weakening on January 3, as convection surrounding the system had decreased as it started to recurve and move towards the southeast. Over the next couple of days satellite imagery showed that the system was re-intensifying, before at 1800 UTC on January 5, TCWC Nadi reported that the depression had developed into a tropical cyclone and named it Fili, while it was at its peak intensity of 95 km/h (60 mph). After the cyclone was named it continued to move south-eastwards, before it was last noted to the southeast of the Cook Islands during January 8, by TCWC Wellington.

Tropical Cyclone Gina[edit]

Category 1 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Duration January 6 – January 9
Peak intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min)  987 mbar (hPa)

Severe Tropical Cyclone Harry[edit]

Category 4 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 4 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Duration February 7 – February 23
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (10-min)  925 mbar (hPa)

On February 7, TCWC Nadi reported that a shallow depression had developed, within the monsoon trough about 800 km (495 mi) to the west of Vanuatu. Over the next day the system moved eastwards and developed into a category 1 tropical cyclone.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Hinano[edit]

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Duration February 21 – March 1
Peak intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (10-min)  970 mbar (hPa)

On February 21, the Tahiti Meteorological office started to monitor a tropical depression that had developed on February 19 near the Pitcairn Islands. During February 21, the depression gradually developed further as it moved towards the west-southwest. Later that day it was named Hinano by Tahiti, after it had developed into a severe tropical storm and had become equivalent to a category two tropical cyclone on the Australian tropical cyclone intensity scale. After it was named, Hinano came under the influence of Cyclone Judy and started to move towards the northwest.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Ivy[edit]

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 3 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Clockwise vortex
Duration February 21 – March 3
Peak intensity 155 km/h (100 mph) (10-min)  960 mbar (hPa)

On February 21, a depression developed within the monsoon trough to the north of Vanuatu, and started to move towards the east.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Judy[edit]

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 2 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Duration February 22 – February 28
Peak intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (10-min)  965 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Cyclone Kerry[edit]

Category 2 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Clockwise vortex
Duration March 29 – April 4
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (10-min)  985 mbar (hPa)

On March 29, TCWC Nadi started to monitor a westward moving tropical depression that had developed within a monsoon trough about x to the x of x. Over the next few days, the system moved towards the west before after it several large pressure drops were reported,

Severe Tropical Cyclone Lili[edit]

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 3 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Duration April 6 – April 13
Peak intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (10-min)  955 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Cyclone Meena[edit]

Category 1 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Clockwise vortex
Duration May 1 – May 5 (Exited basin)
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (10-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

On May 1, TCWC Nadi reported that a shallow depression had developed within the monsoon trough, over the south-eastern Solomon Islands.[8] Over the next few days the system remained weak and ill-defined as it moved slowly southwards.[8] On May 3, the JTWC initiated advisories on the system and designated it as Tropical Cyclone 27P, as it started to gradually intensify further.[8][9] The system was subsequently named Meena by TCWC Nadi during May 4, as it had developed into a category 1 tropical cyclone on the Australian scale.[8] Meena subsequently moved into the Australian region during May 5, where it reached its peak intensity before making landfall on the Cape York Peninsular during May 9.[8]

Tropical Depression 28P (Ernie)[edit]

Tropical depression (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Clockwise vortex
Duration May 6 – May 9 (Exited basin)
Peak intensity 55 km/h (35 mph) (10-min)  997 mbar (hPa)

Other systems[edit]

According to TCWC Nadi, a tropical depression existed between May 28 and May 30, to the far west of Fiji, with the associated cloudband located over Fiji between May 27 and May 31. The associated cloudband caused some flooding in low lying areas on the island of Viti Levu.

Season effects[edit]

This table lists all the storms that developed in the South Pacific to the east of longitude 160°E during the 1989–90 season. It includes their intensity on the Australian tropical cyclone intensity scale, duration, name, landfalls, deaths, and damages. All data is taken from the warning centers from the region unless otherwise noted.

Name Dates active Peak classification Sustained
windspeeds
Pressure Land areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths Refs
Eseta December 15 – 28 Category 2 tropical cyclone 95 km/h (60 mph) 985 hPa (29.09 inHg) Vanuatu, New Caledonia
Fiji, New Zealand
>$25 thousand None [2]
Delilah 1
Fili January 1 – 8 Category 2 tropical cyclone 95 km/h (60 mph) 985 hPa (29.09 inHg) None None None
Gina Samoan Islands 5 million
Harry February 8 – 23 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) New Caledonia
None February 9 – 30 Tropical Depression Not Specified Not Specified Fiji Nine [10]
Hinano February 21 – March 1 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 970 hPa (28.65 inHg) French Polynesia
Judy February 22 – 28 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 965 hPa (28.35 inHg)
Ivy Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 155 km/h (100 mph) 960 hPa (28.20 inHg)
Kerry
Lili April 6 – April 13 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) New Caledonia
Meena May 1 – 5 Category 1 tropical cyclone 85 km/h (50 mph) 990 hPa ( inHg) Solomon Islands Minor None
Ernie May 6 – 9 Tropical Depression 65 km/h (35 mph) 997 hPa ( inHg)
None May 28 – 30 Tropical Depression Not Specified Not Specified
No land areas affected.
[10]
Season Aggregates
12 systems November 23 – May 19 140 km/h (85 mph) 960 hPa (28.35 inHg) >$18.5 million


See also[edit]

  • Atlantic hurricane seasons: 1990, 1991
  • Pacific hurricane seasons: 1990, 1991
  • Pacific typhoon seasons: 1990, 1991
  • North Indian Ocean cyclone seasons: 1990, 1991

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Drosdowsky, L; Woodcock, F. "The South Pacific and southeast Indian Ocean Cyclone Season 1988–89". Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Journal (Australian Bureau of Meteorology) (39): 113–129. Retrieved July 27, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Prasad Rajendra; Fiji Meteorological Service (1989). DeAngellis, Richard M. ed. Tropical Cyclone Eseta (Mariners Weather Log: Fall 1989). 33. United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. p. 42.
  3. ^ a b Darwin Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre (1989). "December 1988". Darwin Tropical Diagnostic Statement (Australian Bureau of Meteorology) 7 (12): 2–3. ISSN 1321-4233. Archived from the original on July 27, 2014. Retrieved July 27, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b RSMC Nadi – Tropical Cyclone Centre, TCWC Brisbane, TCWC Wellington (May 22, 2009). "TCWC Wellington Best Track Data 1967–2006". Fiji Meteorological Service, Meteorological Service of New Zealand Limited, Australian Bureau of Meteorology. United States: International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship. 
  5. ^ a b c December 1988 Upper North Island Flooding (NZ Historic Weather Events Catalog). National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research. November 7, 2013. Archived from the original on July 27, 2014. http://www.webcitation.org/6RNrUAg8u. Retrieved July 27, 2014.
  6. ^ Tropical cyclones in Vanuatu: 1847 to 1994. Vanuatu Meteorological Service. May 19, 1994. Archived from the original on November 18, 2010. http://www.pacificdisaster.net/pdnadmin/data/original/VUT_TC_1847_1994.pdf. Retrieved July 27, 2014.
  7. ^ McGree, Simon; Yeo, Stephen W; Devi, Swastika (October 1, 2010). "Flooding in the Fiji Islands between 1840 and 2009". Risk Frontiers. p. 41. Archived from the original on July 26, 2014. Retrieved July 27, 2014. 
  8. ^ a b c d e Tropical Cyclone Meena (Report). Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Archived from the original on November 8, 2014. http://www.webcitation.org/6Tvn8ugCu.
  9. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center; Naval Pacific Meteorology and Oceanography Center. Annual Tropical Cyclone Report: 1989 (Report). United States Navy, United States Air Force. pp. 194, 241-249. http://www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/nmfc-ph/RSS/jtwc/atcr/1989atcr.pdf. Retrieved November 8, 2014.
  10. ^ a b Gosai, Ashmita; Motilal, Simon (2001). List of floods occurring in the Fiji Islands between 1840 and 2000 (FMS Information Sheet No. 125). Fiji Meteorological Service. p. 15. Archived from the original on 2011-05-11. http://www.pacificdisaster.net/pdnadmin/data/original/FJI_MET_2001_floods1840_2000.pdf. Retrieved 2011-04-30.

External links[edit]