1988 Cleveland Browns season

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1988 Cleveland Browns season
Head coach Marty Schottenheimer
General manager Ernie Accorsi
Owner Art Modell
Home field Cleveland Municipal Stadium
Local radio WDOK · WWWE
Results
Record 10–6
Division place T-2nd AFC Central
Playoff finish Lost AFC Wild Card Playoffs
Timeline
Previous season Next season
1987 1989

The 1988 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 39th season with the National Football League.

Despite taking the Browns to the playoffs for the fourth consecutive season, head coach Marty Schottenheimer was fired at the end of the 1988 season. He left the Browns having compiled a record of 44–27 (a 62% winning percentage) with the team.

Offseason[edit]

NFL Draft[edit]

1988 Cleveland Browns draft
Round Pick Player Position College Notes
1 21 Clifford Charlton  OLB Florida
50 Michael Dean Perry *  DT Clemson
77 Van Waiters  OLB Indiana
103 Anthony Blaylock  CB Winston-Salem
188 Thane Gash  DB East Tennessee State
216 J.J. Birden  WR Oregon
      Made roster    †   Pro Football Hall of Fame    *   Made at least one Pro Bowl during career

Personnel[edit]

Staff[edit]

1988 Cleveland Browns staff
Front office

Head coaches

Offensive coaches

Defensive coaches
  • Defensive Coordinator – Dave Adolph
  • Defensive Line – Tom Pratt
  • Secondary – Bill Cowher
  • Special Assistant/Defense – Darvin Wallis

Special teams coaches

Strength and conditioning

[1]

Regular season[edit]

Schedule[edit]

Week Date Opponent Result Attendance
1 September 4, 1988 at Kansas City Chiefs W 6–3
55,654
2 September 11, 1988 New York Jets L 23–3
74,434
3 September 19, 1988 Indianapolis Colts W 23–17
75,148
4 September 25, 1988 at Cincinnati Bengals L 24–17
54,943
5 October 2, 1988 at Pittsburgh Steelers W 23–9
56,410
6 October 9, 1988 Seattle Seahawks L 16–10
78,605
7 October 16, 1988 Philadelphia Eagles W 19–3
78,787
8 October 23, 1988 at Phoenix Cardinals W 29–21
61,261
9 October 30, 1988 Cincinnati Bengals W 23–16
79,147
10 November 7, 1988 at Houston Oilers L 24–17
51,467
11 November 13, 1988 at Denver Broncos L 30–7
75,806
12 November 20, 1988 Pittsburgh Steelers W 27–7
77,131
13 November 27, 1988 at Washington Redskins W 17–13
51,604
14 December 4, 1988 Dallas Cowboys W 24–21
77,683
15 December 12, 1988 at Miami Dolphins L 38–31
61,884
16 December 18, 1988 Houston Oilers W 28–23
74,610

Playoffs[edit]

Week Date Opponent Result
Wild Card December 24, 1988 Houston Oilers L 24–23

Game summaries[edit]

Week 16[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Oilers 10 6 7 0 23
• Browns 0 7 7 14 28

[2]


Standings[edit]

AFC Central
W L T PCT DIV CONF PF PA
Cincinnati Bengals(1) 12 4 0 .750 4–2 8–4 448 329
Cleveland Browns(4) 10 6 0 .625 4–2 6–6 304 288
Houston Oilers(5) 10 6 0 .625 3–3 7–5 365 424
Pittsburgh Steelers 5 11 0 .313 1–5 4–8 336 421

Playoffs[edit]

AFC Wild Card Game[edit]

Houston Oilers 24, Cleveland Browns 23
1 2 3 4 Total
Oilers 0 14 0 10 24
Browns 3 6 7 7 23

at Cleveland Stadium, Cleveland, Ohio

Oilers cornerback Richard Johnson's interception set up kicker Tony Zendejas' game-clinching 49-field field goal with 1:54 left in the game. After the Browns scored first on a 33-yard field goal by Matt Bahr, Houston marched 91 yards to score on quarterback Warren Moon's 14-yard touchdown pass to running back Allen Pinkett. Then on Cleveland's next drive, Oilers defensive lineman Richard Byrd recovered quarterback Don Strock's fumble to set up Pinkett's 16-yard touchdown run. Bahr later made two field goals to cut Houston's lead, 14–9, before halftime. In the third quarter, backup quarterback Mike Pagel, who replaced an injured Strock, threw a 14-yard touchdown completion to wide receiver Webster Slaughter to put the Browns ahead, 16–14. However, the Oilers marched on a 76-yard drive that was capped with running back Lorenzo White's 1-yard rushing touchdown. After Johnson's interception and Zendejas' subsequent game-clinching 49-yard field goal, Slaughter caught a 2-yard touchdown reception to close out the scoring.

Awards and records[edit]

Milestones[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "All-Time Assistant Coaches". ClevelandBrowns.com. Archived from the original on May 22, 2008. Retrieved February 6, 2009. 
  2. ^ Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved 2013-Dec-22.