1989–90 Calgary Flames season

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1989–90 Calgary Flames
Smythe Division Champions
Division 1st Smythe
Conference 1st Campbell
1989–90 record 42–23–15
Home record 28–7–5
Road record 14–16–10
Goals for 348 (1st)
Goals against 265 (4th)
Team information
General Manager Cliff Fletcher
Coach Terry Crisp
Captain Jim Peplinski (Oct)
Brad McCrimmon (Oct-Apr)
Alternate captains Tim Hunter
Doug Gilmour
Arena Olympic Saddledome
Average attendance 19,861
Team leaders
Goals Joe Nieuwendyk (45)
Assists Doug Gilmour (67)
Points Joe Nieuwendyk (95)
Penalties in minutes Tim Hunter (279)
Wins Mike Vernon (23)
Goals against average Mike Vernon (3.13)
<1988–89 1990–91>
Calgary Flames 10th anniversary logo patch

The 1989–90 Calgary Flames season was the tenth National Hockey League season in Calgary. In defence of their first Stanley Cup championship, the Flames remained a dominant team on the ice, finishing atop the Smythe Division for the third consecutive year, and 2nd overall in the NHL with 99 points - two points behind the Boston Bruins.

The regular season success did not translate in the post season, however, as the Flames were stunned by the Los Angeles Kings in six games in the first round of the playoffs. The loss would begin a 15–year period of playoff frustration, as the Flames would not win another post season round until the 2003–04 season.

Following the loss, the Flames fired head coach Terry Crisp, later replacing him with Doug Risebrough. In three seasons with the Flames, Crisp compiled a 144–63–33 record, with one Stanley Cup win and two President's Trophies.[1]

Individually, Russian superstar Sergei Makarov, who was drafted by the Flames in 1983, was allowed to leave the Soviet Union and play in the NHL. Makarov finished 4th in team scoring with 86 points. The 32 year old Makarov captured the Calder Trophy as the NHL's rookie of the year. The selection was controversial, as Makarov had played 11 pro seasons in the Soviet Union prior to joining the Flames. As a result, the league changed the rules for the following seasons, stating that only players under the age of 26 would be eligible for the award.[2]

Four Flames were named to represent the Campbell Conference at the 1990 All-Star Game: Forwards Joe Mullen and Joe Nieuwendyk, defenceman Al MacInnis and goaltender Mike Vernon.[3]

Regular season[edit]

The Flames finished first in scoring, with 348 goals for, and first in power-play percentage, with 27.73% (99 for 357).[4]

Season standings[edit]

Smythe Division
GP W L T GF GA Pts
Calgary Flames 80 42 23 15 348 265 99
Edmonton Oilers 80 38 28 14 315 283 90
Winnipeg Jets 80 37 32 11 298 290 85
Los Angeles Kings 80 34 39 7 338 337 75
Vancouver Canucks 80 25 41 14 245 306 64

[5]Note: GP = Games played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, Pts = Points, GF = Goals for, GA = Goals against

Note: Teams that qualified for the playoffs are highlighted in bold.


Campbell Conference[6]
R Div GP W L T GF GA Pts
1 Calgary Flames SMY 80 42 23 15 348 265 99
2 Edmonton Oilers SMY 80 38 28 14 315 283 90
3 Winnipeg Jets SMY 80 37 32 11 298 290 85
4 Chicago Blackhawks NRS 80 41 33 6 316 294 88
5 St. Louis Blues NRS 80 37 34 9 295 279 83
6 Toronto Maple Leafs NRS 80 38 38 4 337 358 80
7 Los Angeles Kings SMY 80 34 39 7 338 337 75
8 Minnesota North Stars NRS 80 36 40 4 284 291 76
9 Detroit Red Wings NRS 80 28 38 14 288 323 70
10 Vancouver Canucks SMY 80 25 41 14 245 306 64

Divisions: NRS – Norris, SMY – Smythe

bold – Qualified for playoffs


Schedule and results[edit]

1989–90 Game Log

Playoffs[edit]

The Flames defense of their first Stanley Cup championship ended quickly as Calgary was stunned by the Los Angeles Kings in six games. The loss would begin a string of playoff disappointments for the Flames, who would not win another playoff round until the 2004 Stanley Cup Playoffs.

The Flames 12–4 defeat in game four of the series remains a Flames team record for most goals against in one playoff game.[7]

1990 Stanley Cup Playoffs

Player statistics[edit]

Skaters[edit]

Note: GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; PIM = Penalty minutes

    Regular season   Playoffs
Player # GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
Joe Nieuwendyk 25 79 45 50 95 40 6 4 6 10 4
Doug Gilmour 39 78 24 67 91 54 6 3 1 4 8
Al MacInnis 2 79 28 62 90 82 6 2 3 5 8
Sergei Makarov 42 80 24 62 86 55 6 0 6 6 3
Gary Suter 20 76 16 60 76 97 6 0 1 1 12
Gary Roberts 10 78 39 33 72 222 6 2 5 7 41
Joe Mullen 7 78 36 33 69 24 6 3 0 3 0
Theoren Fleury 14 80 31 35 66 157 6 2 3 5 10
Paul Ranheim 28 80 26 28 54 23 6 1 3 4 2
Brian MacLellan 27 65 20 18 38 26 6 0 2 2 8
Jamie Macoun 34 78 8 27 35 70 6 0 3 3 10
Joel Otto 29 75 13 20 33 116 6 2 2 4 2
Jiri Hrdina 17 64 12 18 30 31 6 0 1 1 2
Dana Murzyn 5 78 7 13 20 140 6 2 2 4 2
Brad McCrimmon 4 79 4 15 19 78 6 0 2 2 8
Ric Nattress 6 49 1 14 15 26 6 2 0 2 8
Colin Patterson 11 61 5 3 8 20 - - - - -
Jonas Bergqvist 18 22 2 5 7 10 - - - - -
Mark Hunter 22 10 2 3 5 39 - - - - -
Tim Hunter 19 67 2 3 5 279 6 0 0 0 4
Roger Johansson 21 35 0 5 5 48 - - - - -
Sergei Priakin 16 20 2 2 4 0 2 0 0 0 0
Mike Vernon 30 47 0 3 3 21 6 0 0 0 0
Jim Korn 26 9 0 2 2 26 4 1 0 1 12
Jim Peplinski 24 6 1 0 1 4 - - - - -
Brian Glynn 32 1 0 0 0 0 - - - - -
Steve Guenette 1 2 0 0 0 2 - - - - -
Stu Grimson 35 3 0 0 0 17 - - - - -
Marc Bureau 33 5 0 0 0 4 - - - - -
Ken Sabourin 55 5 0 0 0 10 - - - - -
Rick Wamsley 31 36 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0

Denotes player spent time with another team before joining Calgary. Stats reflect time with the Flames only.

Goaltenders[edit]

Note: GP = Games played; TOI = Time on ice (minutes); W = Wins; L = Losses; OT = Overtime/shootout losses; GA = Goals against; SO = Shutouts; GAA = Goals against average

    Regular season   Playoffs
Player # GP TOI W L T GA SO GAA GP TOI W L GA SO GAA
Mike Vernon 30 47 2795 23 14 9 146 1 3.13 6 342 2 3 19 0 3.33
Rick Wamsley 31 36 1969 18 8 6 107 0 3.26 1 49 0 1 9 0 11.02
Steve Guenette 1 2 119 1 1 0 8 0 4.03 - - - - - - -

Transactions[edit]

The Flames were involved in the following transactions during the 1989–90 season.

Trades[edit]

June 16, 1989 To Calgary Flames
2nd round pick in 1989 (Kent Manderville)
To Toronto Maple Leafs
Rob Ramage
March 6, 1990 To Calgary Flames
Jim Korn
To New Jersey Devils
5th round pick in 1990 (Petr Kuchyna)

Free Agents[edit]

Player Former team
Player New team
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Draft picks[edit]

Calgary's picks at the 1989 NHL Entry Draft, held in Bloomington, Minnesota.[8]

Rnd Pick Player Nationality Position Team (league) NHL statistics
GP G A Pts PIM
2 24 Kent Manderville  Canada C N/A 646 37 67 104 348
2 42 Ted Drury  United States C N/A 414 41 52 93 367
3 50 Veli-Pekka Kautonen  Finland D HIFK Helsinki (FNL)
3 63 Corey Lyons  Canada RW Lethbridge Hurricanes (WHL)
4 70 Robert Reichel  Czechoslovakia C CHZ LITVÍNOV (CZE) 830 252 378 630 388
4 84 Ryan O'Leary  United States C N/A
5 105 Toby Kearney  United States LW N/A
7 147 Alex Nikolic  Canada LW Cornell (ECAC)
8 168 Kevin Wortman  United States D N/A 5 0 0 0 2
9 189 Sergei Gomolyako  Soviet Union RW Traktor Chelyabinsk (USSR)
10 210 Dan Sawyer  United States D N/A
11 231 Alexander Yudin  Soviet Union D HC Dynamo Moscow (USSR)
12 252 Kenneth Kennholt  Sweden D Djurgårdens IF (SEL)
S 26 Shawn Heaphy  Canada C N/A 1 0 0 0 2

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Player stats: 2006–07 Calgary Flames Media Guide, pg 122
  • Game log: 2006–07 Calgary Flames Media Guide, pg 138
  • Team standings: 1989–90 NHL standings @hockeydb.com
  • Trades: Individual player pages at hockeydb.com
  1. ^ Crisp Is Dismissed As Coach of Flames, New York Times, May 8, 1990, accessed June 10, 2007
  2. ^ New Rules for Rookies, New York Times, June 20, 1990, accessed June 10, 2007
  3. ^ All-Stars, 2006–07 Calgary Flames Media Guide, pg. 22
  4. ^ http://www.hockey-reference.com/leagues/NHL_1990.html
  5. ^ Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2011). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book 2012. Dan Diamond & Associates. p. 153. ISBN 9781894801225. 
  6. ^ "1989-1990 Conference Standings Standings - NHL.com - Standings". NHL. 
  7. ^ Playoff Records, 2006–07 Calgary Flames Media Guide, pg. 225
  8. ^ Calgary Flames draft history, hockeydb.com, accessed June 4, 2007