1989 San Francisco Giants season

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1989 San Francisco Giants
National League West Champions
National League Champions
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) Bob Lurie
General manager(s) Al Rosen
Manager(s) Roger Craig
Local television KTVU
(Duane Kuiper, Steve Physioc, Hank Greenwald)
GiantsVision
(Joe Morgan, Duane Kuiper)
Local radio KNBR
(Ron Fairly, Hank Greenwald)
KLOK
(Tito Fuentes, Julio Gonzalez)
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The 1989 San Francisco Giants season saw the Giants finish in first place in the National League West with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses. It was their second division title in three years. The Giants defeated the Chicago Cubs in five games in the National League Championship Series. However, they were swept by their cross-Bay rivals, the Oakland Athletics, in an earthquake-marred World Series.

Offseason[edit]

  • December 8, 1988: Mike Aldrete was traded by the San Francisco Giants to the Montreal Expos for Tracy Jones.[1]
  • February 27, 1989: Ernie Camacho was signed as a Free Agent with the San Francisco Giants.[2]

Regular season[edit]

Opening Day starters[edit]

Season standings[edit]

NL West W L GB Pct.
San Francisco Giants 92 70 -- .568
San Diego Padres 89 73 3.0 .549
Houston Astros 86 76 6.0 .531
Los Angeles Dodgers 77 83 14.0 .481
Cincinnati Reds 75 87 17.0 .463
Atlanta Braves 63 97 28.0 .394

Notable transactions[edit]

  • April 14, 1989: Goose Gossage was signed as a Free Agent with the San Francisco Giants.[3]
  • June 5, 1989: Clay Bellinger was drafted by the San Francisco Giants in the 2nd round of the 1989 amateur draft. Player signed June 8, 1989.[4]
  • June 16, 1989: Tracy Jones was traded by the San Francisco Giants to the Detroit Tigers for Pat Sheridan.[5]
  • June 18, 1989: Charlie Hayes was traded by the San Francisco Giants with Dennis Cook and Terry Mulholland to the Philadelphia Phillies for a player to be named later and Steve Bedrosian. The Philadelphia Phillies sent Rick Parker (August 7, 1989) to the San Francisco Giants to complete the trade.[6]
  • August 2, 1989: Bob Brenly signed as a Free Agent.
  • August 10, 1989: Goose Gossage was selected off waivers by the New York Yankees from the San Francisco Giants.[3]

Major League debuts[edit]

  • Batters: Mike Benjamin (July 7) Greg Litton (May 2)
  • Pitchers: Randy McCament (June 28) Russ Swan (August 3) Stu Tate (September 20) [7]

Game log and schedule[edit]

Legend
  Giants win
  Giants loss
  Postponement
Bold Giants team member
1989 Game Log (92–70) (Home: 53–28; Road: 39–42)

Postseason[edit]

1989 Postseason Game Log

Roster[edit]

1989 San Francisco Giants
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Dave Dravecky[edit]

The previous season, a cancerous desmoid tumor was found in Dravecky's pitching arm. He underwent surgery on October 7, 1988, removing half of the deltoid muscle in his pitching arm and freezing the humerus bone in an effort to eliminate all of the cancerous cells. By July 1989, he was pitching in the minors, and on August 10, he made a highly publicized return to the major leagues, pitching 8 innings and defeating Cincinnati 4-3. In his following start five days later against the Expos, Dravecky pitched three no-hit innings, but in the fifth inning, he felt a tingling sensation in his arm. In the sixth inning he started off shaky, allowing a home run to the lead off batter and then hitting the second batter. Then, on his first pitch to Tim Raines, his humerus bone snapped, ending his career.

To see a pitcher break his arm with a loud cracking sound while doing something as ordinary as throwing a pitch, then fall to the ground rolling in agonizing pain, was shocking, unusual, and upsetting, especially for those who had followed his touching story. The pitch was replayed on television repeatedly over the following days.

The Giants won the National League pennant in 1989, and in the post-game celebration, Dravecky's arm was broken a second time. A doctor examining Dravecky's x-rays noticed a mass in his arm. Cancer had returned. Eighteen days later, Dravecky retired from baseball, aged 33, leaving a 64-57 record with 558 strikeouts and a 3.13 ERA in 1,062.2 innings. He won the 1989 Willie Mac Award honoring his spirit and leadership.

Player stats[edit]

Batting[edit]

Starters by position[edit]

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

= Indicates team leader
Pos. Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Kennedy, TerryTerry Kennedy 125 355 85 .239 5 34
1B Clark, WillWill Clark 159 588 196 .333 23 111
2B Thompson, RobbyRobby Thompson 148 547 132 .241 13 50
3B Riles, ErnestErnest Riles 122 302 84 .278 7 40
SS Uribe, JoséJosé Uribe 151 453 100 .221 1 30
LF Mitchell, KevinKevin Mitchell 154 543 158 .291 47 125
CF Butler, BrettBrett Butler 154 594 168 .283 4 36
RF Maldonado, CandyCandy Maldonado 129 345 75 .217 9 41

[8]

Other batters[edit]

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Oberkfell, KenKen Oberkfell 83 116 37 .319 2 15
Williams, MattMatt Williams 84 292 59 .202 18 50
Brenly, BobBob Brenly 12 22 4 .182 0 3

Pitching[edit]

Starting pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Garrelts, ScottScott Garrelts 30 193.1 14 5 2.28 119
Reuschel, RickRick Reuschel 32 208.1 17 8 2.94 111
Robinson, DonDon Robinson 34 197 12 11 3.43 96
Downs, KellyKelly Downs 18 82.2 4 8 4.79 49
Krukow, MikeMike Krukow 8 43 4 3 3.98 18

[8]

Other pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA
LaCoss, MikeMike LaCoss 45 150.1 10 10 3.17 78

Relief pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Bedrosian, SteveSteve Bedrosian 40 1 4 17 2.65 34
Gossage, GooseGoose Gossage 31 2 1 4 2.68 24
Lefferts, CraigCraig Lefferts 70 2 4 20 2.69 71
Brantley, JeffJeff Brantley 59 7 1 0 4.07 69

National League Championship Series[edit]

Game 1[edit]

October 4 at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 3 0 1 4 0 0 0 3 0 11 13 0
Chicago 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 8 1
W: Scott Garrelts (1-0)   L: Greg Maddux (0-1)   S: None
HR: SFWill Clark (1), (2), Kevin Mitchell (1)  CHCMark Grace (1), Ryne Sandberg (1)
Pitchers: SF – Garrelts, Brantley (8), Hammaker (9)  CHC – Maddux, Kilgus (5), Wilson (8)
Attendance: 39,195

Game 2[edit]

October 5 at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 5 10 0
Chicago 6 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 X 9 11 0
W: Les Lancaster (1-0)   L: Rick Reuschel (0-1)   S: None
HR: SFKevin Mitchell (2), Matt Williams (1), Robby Thompson (1)  CHC – None
Pitchers: SF – Reuschel, Downs (1), Lefferts (6), Brantley (7), Bedrosian (8)  CHC – Bielecki, Assenmacher (5), Lancaster (6)
Attendance: 39,195

Game 3[edit]

October 7 at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 4 10 0
San Francisco 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 X 5 8 3
W: Don Robinson (1-0)   L: Les Lancaster (1-1)   S: Steve Bedrosian (1)
HR: CHC – None  SFRobby Thompson (2)
Pitchers: CHC – Sutcliffe, Assenmacher (7), Lancaster (7)  SF – LaCoss, Brantley (4), Robinson (7), Lefferts (8), Bedrosian (9)
Attendance: 62,065

Game 4[edit]

October 8 at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 4 12 1
San Francisco 1 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 X 6 9 1
W: Kelly Downs (1-0)   L: Steve Wilson (0-1)   S: Steve Bedrosian (2)
HR: CHCLuis Salazar (1)  SFMatt Williams (2)
Pitchers: CHC – Maddux, Wilson (4), Sanderson (6), Williams (8)  SF – Garrelts, Downs (5), Bedrosian (9)
Attendance: 62,078

Game 5[edit]

October 9 at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 10 1
San Francisco 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 X 3 4 1
W: Rick Reuschel (1-1)   L: Mike Bielecki (0-1)   S: Steve Bedrosian (3)
HR: CHC – None  SF – None
Pitchers: CHC – Bielecki, Williams (8), Lancaster (8)  SF – Reuschel, Bedrosian (9)
Attendance: 62,084

The Giants made it to their first World Series since 1962 with a 3-2 win over the Cubs to win the 1989 National League pennant, four games to one. The final game pitted Mike Bielecki against a well-rested (due to his quick exit from Game 2) Rick Reuschel. Reuschel made amends for his poor start in Game 2 by giving up only one run over eight innings. The one run Reuschel gave up was an unearned run the Cubs scored when Walton reached on an error by Mitchell and then scored on Sandberg's double. The Cubs held the 1-0 lead until the seventh inning when Will Clark tripled and scored on Mitchell's sacrifice fly.

With two outs in the eighth, the Cubs appeared ready to perhaps send the series back to Chicago. But Candy Maldonado pinch-hit for Reuschel and walked. Bielcki then proceeded the load the bases by walking both Butler and Thompson. Don Zimmer sent for Mitch Williams to end the jam, but Clark drove a single to center that gave the Giants a 3-1 lead. The Cubs strung together three straight singles with two outs in the ninth to pull within a run, but Bedrosian got Sandburg to ground out to second to end the game and the series.

The Giants were in their first World Series since 1962. Clark's stellar performance earned him Most Valuable Player honors for the Giants. Clark hit .650 with eight RBIs.

World series[edit]

Main article: 1989 World Series

It was the first World Series in which the losing team never had the lead and never had the tying run at the plate in its final turn at-bat.[9]

Game 1[edit]

October 14, 1989 at Oakland Coliseum in Oakland, California.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1
Oakland 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 X 5 11 1
W: Dave Stewart (1-0) L: Scott Garrelts (0-1)

Game 2[edit]

October 15, 1989 at Oakland Coliseum in Oakland, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 0
Oakland 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 X 5 7 0
W: Mike Moore (1-0) L: Rick Reuschel (0-1)

Game 3[edit]

October 27, 1989 at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California

The game was delayed until October 27, or about ten days, due to the Loma Prieta earthquake.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Oakland 2 0 0 2 4 1 0 4 0 13 14 0
San Francisco 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 4 7 10 3
W: Dave Stewart (2-0) L: Scott Garrelts (0-2)

Game 4[edit]

October 28, 1989 at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Oakland 1 3 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 9 12 0
San Francisco 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 6 9 0
W: Mike Moore (2-0) L: Don Robinson (0-1) S:Dennis Eckersley

Award winners[edit]

All-Star Game

Farm system[edit]

Level Team League Manager
AAA Phoenix Firebirds Pacific Coast League Gordon Mackenzie
AA Shreveport Captains Texas League Bill Evers
A San Jose Giants California League Duane Espy
A Clinton Giants Midwest League Keith Bodie
Short-Season A Everett Giants Northwest League Joe Strain
Rookie Pocatello Giants Pioneer League Deron McCue

[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mike Aldrete Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com
  2. ^ "Ernie Camacho Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-reference.com. Archived from the original on August 20, 2008. Retrieved September 6, 2008. 
  3. ^ a b "Rich Gossage Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-reference.com. Archived from the original on September 5, 2008. Retrieved September 6, 2008. 
  4. ^ "Clay Bellinger Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-reference.com. Archived from the original on August 11, 2008. Retrieved September 6, 2008. 
  5. ^ "Tracy Jones Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-reference.com. Archived from the original on October 11, 2008. Retrieved September 6, 2008. 
  6. ^ Charlie Hayes Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com
  7. ^ http://www.thebaseballcube.com/statistics/1989/25.shtml
  8. ^ a b "1989 San Francisco Giants Statistics and Roster - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-reference.com. Archived from the original on September 16, 2008. Retrieved September 6, 2008. 
  9. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p.366, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, NY, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0
  10. ^ http://www.baseball-almanac.com/awards/aw_hut.shtml
  11. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, N.C.: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

External links[edit]