1989 WAFL season

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1989 WAFL season
Teams 8
Premiers Claremont
(7th premiership)
Minor premiers Claremont
(8th minor premiership)
Matches played 89
Bernie Naylor Medallist Neil Lester-Smith (East Fremantle)
Sandover Medal Craig Edwards (South Fremantle)
1988
1990 (WASFL) →

The 1989 WAFL season was the one hundred and fifth season of senior football in Perth. It saw Claremont continue its dominance of the competition with a third successive minor premiership under Gerard Neesham, despite having lost most of their top players of previous seasons to the VFL, and their 1988 conquerors Subiaco fall to third last with a mere six wins – their worst performance since the dark days of 1983 when the club had not played in the finals for nine years and had been wooden spooners four times in eight seasons. Coach Bunton had to promote many young players and knew 1989 was to be a year of rebuilding,[1] though only a second (and last as of 2014) Colts premiership under Eddie Pitter showed Subiaco did possess much resilience.[2]

Perth, who in 1988 had had their best record since 1978 and returned to Lathlain Park after the experiment of playing at their pre-1959 home of the WACA Ground was regarded as a financial failure, were also severely disappointing.[3] Swan Districts, who in 1988 had become the first club to suffer the ignominy of being last in all three grades,[a] rebounded so well despite the absence of Narkle that after thirteen rounds they were certainties for the four before a run of wins by West Perth coincided with a Swan slump and allowed the Falcons to reach the finals for only the third time in eleven seasons.

The season saw two experimental matches played in outer suburbs so that the WAFL could assess the possibility of relocating financially crippled Perth and West Perth to the Perth Hills and the growing northwestern corridor respectively.[4] The former move never occurred due to dissent within the committee, the latter did however five years subsequently.

Another first was the semi-finals double-header that was to become standard in the league during the 1990s, instigated due to the only senior finals tie since the 1938 Grand Final and the refusal of Claremont and South Fremantle to accept two weekends without a match.[5] Although a game on Saturday and one on Sunday was proposed, the first semi-final replay was ultimately played before the second semi on the Saturday.[6][b] There were also suggestions for the first time of the WAFL expanding beyond Perth to such rural centres as Bunbury and Geraldton and that established Perth clubs merge in order to adapt to the new realities of a national VFL/AFL competition.[7]

A more pressing issue was the off-field debate between Indian Pacific (the holders of the Eagles’ VFL licence) and the WAFL over the running of football in Western Australia, with Indian Pacific demanding an independent West Australian Football Commission rather than one controlled by the WAFL which was felt to be depressing standards.[8] The dispute after the VFL allowed the Eagles to field a reserves team in exchange for a larger list[9] continued: the VFL wanted the Eagles’ reserves playing in the VFL/AFL reserve grade competition, but that was unacceptable to the WAFC due to the cost of moving extra players to Melbourne, whilst the WAFC’s preferred option of an Eagle reserves team in the WAFL was not acceptable to WAFL club executives as it would upset the tried-and-proved WAFL structure.[10]

Home-and-away Season[edit]

Round 1[edit]

Round 1
Saturday, 8 April West Perth 13.12 (90) def. by South Fremantle 19.19 (133) Leederville Oval (crowd: 4300)
Saturday, 8 April Swan Districts 23.8 (146) def. Perth 16.9 (105) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 4100) [11]
Saturday, 8 April Subiaco 5.14 (44) def. by Claremont 17.11 (113) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 5000)
Saturday, 8 April East Fremantle 23.17 (155) def. East Perth 9.10 (64) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4300) [12]

The return in the reserves of injury-plagued Andrew Macnish proves the sole highlight for Subiaco in the Grand Final replay – the Lions’ league team minus Breman and Georgiades has absolutely no target in attack.[13]

Round 2[edit]

Round 2
Saturday, 15 April East Perth 10.11 (71) def. by Swan Districts 17.16 (118) WACA (crowd: 4267)
Saturday, 15 April Perth 9.14 (68) def. by Subiaco 15.17 (107) Lathlain Park (crowd: 4398) [14]
Saturday, 15 April Claremont 15.23 (113) def. West Perth 10.11 (71) Claremont Oval (crowd: 3720) [15]
Saturday, 15 April South Fremantle 16.19 (115) def. East Fremantle 13.19 (97) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 9358)
  • Sixteen-year-old Glen Jakovich kicks five goals to combine with Stevan Jackson in an impressive attack that East Fremantle cannot counter despite Jackson’s severely inaccurate total of 1.5 (11).[16]
  • The move of former centreman/defender Troy Ugle to the forward line and veteran defender Don Langsford onto the ball sparks 1988 wooden spooners Swans to equal top position with a ten-goal-to-two second half.[17]

Round 3[edit]

Round 3
Saturday, 22 April West Perth 18.15 (123) def. East Perth 14.15 (99) Leederville Oval (crowd: 3440)
Saturday, 22 April Claremont 19.24 (138) def. Swan Districts 14.8 (92) Claremont Oval (crowd: 4200)
Saturday, 22 April Perth 13.19 (97) def. by East Fremantle 27.27 (189) Kelmscott (crowd: 3601)
Sunday, 23 April Subiaco 16.15 (111) def. by South Fremantle 17.15 (117) Kalgoorlie (crowd: 4000) [18]
  • With Perth considering a move to the southeastern Perth Hills, the WAFL plays a game in Kelmscott,[4] but the Demons already look out of the running for the four after being expected contenders before the season started – they were never in the hunt after missing six consecutive shots late in the first quarter.[19]
  • The encouragement of fiancée Theresa helps Chris Davies return to West Perth from the Sunday Football League and he has the ball on a string in the Falcons’ first win for 1989.[20]

Round 4[edit]

Round 4
Saturday, 29 April West Perth 18.15 (123) def. Subiaco 10.13 (73) Wanneroo (crowd: 5007) [21]
Saturday, 29 April South Fremantle 19.15 (129) def. Perth 12.12 (84) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 5257)
Saturday, 29 April East Perth 5.17 (47) def. by Claremont 19.26 (140) WACA (crowd: 3050) [22]
Saturday, 29 April Swan Districts 17.12 (114) def. East Fremantle 13.14 (92) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 5100)
  • Brad Shine steels himself in the back pocket for the second half and becomes the driving force for an unexpected win after Swans were behind until three-quarter time. Eight kicks and six marks hold off most East Fremantle thrusts after half-time.[23]
  • In an effort to assess a potential move by the Falcons to the northern suburbs,[24][25] a game is played in the rapidly developing Shire of Wanneroo. West Perth would move to Arena Joondalup for the 1994 season.

Round 5[edit]

Round 5
Saturday, 6 May Swan Districts 18.17 (125) def. Subiaco 16.13 (109) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 5695)
Saturday, 6 May Perth 22.17 (149) def. East Perth 11.8 (74) Lathlain Park (crowd: 3466) [26]
Saturday, 6 May Claremont 17.18 (120) def. South Fremantle 15.10 (100) Albany (crowd: 4638)
Saturday, 6 May East Fremantle 19.14 (128) def. West Perth 14.19 (103) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4671)

In a fine match watched by a figure claimed to be as high as six thousand,[c] Claremont overcome an 8.5 (53) first quarter with four goals to Craig Edwards as Neesham’s brain and skill – compensating for his lack of size and speed – controls a torrid game thereafter.[27]

Round 6[edit]

Round 6
Saturday, 13 May West Perth 15.24 (114) def. by Swan Districts 17.13 (115) Leederville Oval (crowd: 4403)
Saturday, 13 May South Fremantle 18.18 (126) def. East Perth 11.12 (78) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3510) [28]
Saturday, 13 May Claremont 18.25 (133) def. Perth 18.10 (118) Claremont Oval (crowd: 3309)
Saturday, 13 May Subiaco 18.14 (122) def. East Fremantle 16.14 (110) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 3780)
  • Greg Walker’s skill has some observers thinking his champion father[d] is making a comeback, as his speed along with Passeri, Bazzo and the Holmes brothers lift Swan Districts to a thrilling win.[29]
  • Despite a Demon burst of 10.4 (64) to 0.4 (4) either side of half-time, Perth’s poor defence that takes only seven marks all game means it cannot hold the Tigers for the remainder of the afternoon.[30]

Round 7[edit]

Round 7
Saturday, 20 May Swan Districts 12.15 (87) def. by South Fremantle 17.10 (112) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 6352) [31]
Saturday, 20 May Perth 9.20 (74) def. by West Perth 15.20 (110) Lathlain Park (crowd: 3158)
Saturday, 20 May East Perth 12.12 (84) def. Subiaco 11.13 (79) WACA (crowd: 2504) [32]
Saturday, 20 May East Fremantle 4.11 (35) def. by Claremont 10.18 (78) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4168)
  • In appalling conditions, Claremont’s remarkably pin-point precision football in Brian Peake’s three hundred and fiftieth senior Australian Rules match gives a convincing win. Peake is his side’s best in an unfamiliar role tagging fellow veteran Neesham.[33]
  • Robert Wiley, having high expectation at season’s opening, is very angry at Perth’s lack of teamwork in the second half, when west Perth, led by the previously out-of-form Mifka, Madaffari and O‘Brien, score 9.11 (65) to 3.10 (28).[3]

Round 8[edit]

Round 8
Saturday, 27 May South Fremantle 6.11 (47) def. by West Perth 12.15 (87) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3682) [34]
Saturday, 27 May Perth 11.13 (79) def. by Swan Districts 24.10 (154) Lathlain Park (crowd: 2616) [35]
Saturday, 27 May Claremont 9.7 (61) def. by Subiaco 12.19 (91) Claremont Oval (crowd: 3015)
Saturday, 27 May East Perth 8.13 (61) def. by East Fremantle 14.29 (113) WACA (crowd: 2122)
  • Relegated Eagle forward Karl Langdon shows his toughness by being used as a tagger on Neesham and eliminating his influence to defeat the previously unblemished Tigers – who score only 1.3 (9) in the second half – only a week after the Lions lost of last-placed East Perth.[36]
  • West Perth win at Fremantle Oval for the first time since 1978, ending the longest run of failures there since East Fremantle left the ground after the 1952 season.[37]

Round 9 (Foundation Day)[edit]

Round 9
Saturday, 3 June Subiaco 13.14 (92) def. by Perth 14.12 (96) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 3561) [38]
Saturday, 3 June West Perth 12.19 (91) def. by Claremont 27.9 (171) Leederville Oval (crowd: 5428)
Sunday, 4 June Swan Districts 12.13 (85) def. by East Perth 15.15 (105) Dampier Sports Ground (crowd: 3000)
Monday, 5 June East Fremantle 21.14 (140) def. South Fremantle 20.15 (135) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 10000)
  • In perfect weather for football fans are treated to a brilliant display, especially by Claremont whose superb disposal and marking make a good West Perth team appear second-rate.[39]
  • In a second brilliant match for the round, Neil Lester-Smith kicks six goals coming off the bench and Clinton Browning kicked the Sharks’ winning goal in the last minute.[40] The match was compared favourably with the previous week’s VFL thriller between West Coast and top team Hawthorn.[41]

Round 10[edit]

Round 10
Saturday, 10 June South Fremantle 16.15 (111) def. Subiaco 7.9 (51) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4278) [1]
Saturday, 10 June East Perth 15.16 (106) def. West Perth 14.16 (100) WACA (crowd: 3403) [42]
Saturday, 10 June Swan Districts 13.18 (96) def. by Claremont 22.12 (144) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 5126)
Saturday, 10 June Perth 13.10 (88) def. by East Fremantle 17.13 (115) Lathlain Park (crowd: 3178) [43]

Round 11[edit]

Round 11
Saturday, 17 June Subiaco 8.16 (64) def. by West Perth 14.21 (105) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 3839)
Saturday, 17 June Perth 11.10 (76) def. by South Fremantle 18.18 (126) Lathlain Park (crowd: 3306)
Saturday, 17 June Claremont 21.11 (137) def. East Perth 17.13 (115) Claremont Oval (crowd: 3306)
Saturday, 17 June East Fremantle 20.16 (136) def. Swan Districts 16.10 (106) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4276) [44]

Despite losing skipper Menaglio, Mifka, relegated Eagle Turley, plus full-forward Gavin Howlett kicking 3.9 (27) from mainly easy shots, West Perth via direct, efficient play appear a chance for the four despite their loss to the Royals the week previously.[45]

Round 12[edit]

Round 12
Saturday, 24 June Swan Districts 14.17 (101) def. Subiaco 14.11 (95) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 3442) [46]
Saturday, 24 June East Perth 17.16 (118) def. by Perth 19.8 (122) WACA (crowd: 3116) [47]
Saturday, 24 June South Fremantle 16.13 (109) def. Claremont 11.14 (80) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 7668)
Saturday, 24 June West Perth 15.13 (103) def. by East Fremantle 23.13 (151) Leederville Oval (crowd: 3890)

A noisy members’ stand inspires South Fremantle to a fine victory over pacesetters Claremont, as Craig Edwards, already favorite for the Sandover, is a colossus with eighteen kicks and 27 ruck knocks.[48]

Round 13[edit]

Round 13
Saturday, 1 July Swan Districts 18.12 (120) def. West Perth 15.11 (101) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 4399)
Saturday, 1 July East Perth 11.11 (77) def. by South Fremantle 19.16 (130) WACA (crowd: 3398) [49]
Saturday, 1 July Perth 12.8 (80) def. by Claremont 16.13 (109) Lathlain Park (crowd: 2633)
Saturday, 1 July East Fremantle 15.12 (102) def. Subiaco 14.14 (98) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3533) [50]

After shaving his head to convince selectors to give him more games, Swan Districts rover Peter Hodyl looks a new player as he and his fellow rovers dominate the packs during a vital third quarter when Swans score 6.2 (38) to 3.5 (23).[51] The win leaves Swans three games clear in the four and has WAFL official worried about potentially declining attendances.

Round 14[edit]

Round 14
Saturday, 8 July South Fremantle 14.10 (94) def. Swan Districts 14.7 (91) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4683)
Saturday, 8 July West Perth 17.18 (120) def. Perth 16.11 (107) Leederville Oval (crowd: 2636) [52]
Saturday, 8 July Subiaco 22.17 (149) def. East Perth 13.6 (84) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 2741)
Saturday, 8 July Claremont 16.13 (109) def. East Fremantle 11.17 (83) Claremont Oval (crowd: 4200) [53]
  • Willie Rioli kicks a 55-metre goal after a fifty-metre penalty on the siren to win the match, whilst the move of his elder brother Maurice’s move to the half-forward line proved decisive in energising a previously decrepit Bulldog attack.[54]
  • Again-relegated Eagle Langdon provokes Dawson of East Perth into a fifty-metre penalty and with three third-quarter goals leads the Lions to win a battle of the tailenders following a slow start.[55]

Round 15[edit]

Round 15
Saturday, 15 July West Perth 11.14 (80) def. by South Fremantle 13.16 (94) Leederville Oval (crowd: 3748) [56]
Saturday, 15 July Perth 22.6 (138) def. Swan Districts 9.9 (63) Lathlain Park (crowd: 3194)
Saturday, 15 July Subiaco 15.12 (102) def. Claremont 11.16 (82) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 3478) [57]
Saturday, 15 July East Fremantle 20.19 (139) def. East Perth 12.12 (84) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 2641)

The on-ball combination of Mark Watson and Willie Dick suggests the four may not be sealed as the pair demolish Swan Districts and atone for several previous costly Demon lapses.[58]

Round 16[edit]

Round 16
Saturday, 22 July Swan Districts 21.13 (139) def. East Perth 12.14 (86) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 3031)
Saturday, 22 July Perth 18.19 (127) def. Subiaco 14.16 (100) Lathlain Park (crowd: 2684)
Saturday, 22 July Claremont 18.15 (123) def. West Perth 3.12 (30) Claremont Oval (crowd: 2405) [59]
Saturday, 22 July South Fremantle 14.15 (99) def. by East Fremantle 20.6 (126) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 8970) [60]

West Perth are the first WA(N)FL team goalless at half-time since Swan Districts against South Fremantle in Round 15 of 1976. Their only three goals are during the first few minutes of the third quarter, and it is West Perth’s lowest score since 1950 and only the second time since 1928 they have scored just three goals in a match.[61]

Round 17[edit]

Round 17
Saturday, 29 July Subiaco 12.9 (81) def. by South Fremantle 13.14 (92) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 3465) [62]
Saturday, 29 July East Perth 8.14 (62) def. by West Perth 16.10 (106) WACA (crowd: 2377)
Saturday, 29 July Claremont 13.12 (90) def. Swan Districts 9.15 (69) Claremont Oval (crowd: 3303)
Saturday, 29 July East Fremantle 27.15 (177) def. Perth 3.11 (29) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3458)
  • In a hard, physical game from when Tony Evans and Mick Grasso tangle at the opening, Claremont’s greater accuracy in the second half ensures it a critical victory over the tenacious Swans to stay on top.[63]
  • East Fremantle record their biggest win over Perth,[64] who kick the third-lowest score ever at East Fremantle Oval and the lowest since 1964.[65] The Demons, without Watson, are never in the hunt after scoring the first goal within a minute of the start.[66]

Round 18[edit]

Round 18
Saturday, 5 August West Perth 18.11 (119) def. Subiaco 13.10 (88) Leederville Oval (crowd: 2812) [67]
Saturday, 5 August South Fremantle 20.8 (128) def. Perth 13.5 (83) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3282)
Saturday, 5 August East Perth 17.14 (116) def. by Claremont 20.17 (137) WACA (crowd: 2165) [68]
Saturday, 5 August Swan Districts 12.10 (82) def. by East Fremantle 14.21 (105) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 5441)

Despite playing some of their best football during 1989, Swan Districts move into a precarious position via a loss to a powerful, systematic East Fremantle team – led brilliantly by Brian Peake in the centre.[69]

Round 19[edit]

Round 19
Saturday, 12 August Subiaco 15.10 (100) def. by Swan Districts 23.26 (164) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 3017)
Saturday, 12 August Perth 16.20 (116) def. East Perth 12.14 (86) Lathlain Park (crowd: 2225)
Saturday, 12 August Claremont 16.8 (104) def. South Fremantle 12.11 (83) Claremont Oval (crowd: 5514)
Saturday, 12 August East Fremantle 16.19 (115) def. by West Perth 20.10 (130) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3780)
  • A brilliant burst to get within eleven points after West Perth had previously kicked fourteen of fifteen for a fifty-point lead fails to give the Sharks the win needed for a second semi-final berth – Falcon Williams kicks a brilliant goal to seal East Fremantle’s fate.[70]
  • Claremont kick the final seven goals of a match its coach said was “equal in pressure to a VFL game” after South had jumped them with six goals to one in the first quarter, but the Tigers are worried about a hamstring injury to coach Neesham and a should problem to wingman Mark Hann.[71]
  • Despite having to use an obviously injured Brad Shine to replace Kevin Caton after a collision with Subiaco’s Brad McDougall, Swan Districts – with Shine helping exceptionally well – kick 15.16 (106) to 9.2 (56) after a tight first half to be a game and 6.5 percent clear inside the four.[72]
  • Perth ensure East Perth cannot repeat its late escapes from the wooden spoon in 1986, 1987 and 1988 vis a convincing with after an even three quarter led again by defender-cum-centreman Willie Dick.[73]

Round 20[edit]

Round 20
Saturday, 19 August West Perth 16.17 (113) def. Swan Districts 12.16 (88) Leederville Oval (crowd: 7895)
Saturday, 19 August South Fremantle 21.14 (140) def. East Perth 7.4 (46) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3149)
Saturday, 19 August Claremont 15.17 (107) def. Perth 7.15 (57) Claremont Oval (crowd: 2660) [74]
Saturday, 19 August Subiaco 10.18 (78) def. by East Fremantle 21.10 (136) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 2800) [75]

Despite being the victim of a severe bump that was expected to keep him off the field, ex-St. Kilda wingman Jon Riggs recovers to lead West Perth to a criticla win that leaves them 3.83 percent behind Swan Districts in fourth – and with a much easier last-round match.[76]

Round 21[edit]

Round 21
Saturday, 26 August Swan Districts 11.15 (81) def. by South Fremantle 17.14 (116) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 5739)
Saturday, 26 August West Perth 27.15 (177) def. Perth 10.15 (75) Leederville Oval (crowd: 4995) [77]
Saturday, 26 August East Perth 12.17 (89) def. by Subiaco 20.17 (137) WACA (crowd: 1876)
Saturday, 26 August East Fremantle 13.17 (95) def. Claremont 12.15 (87) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 6060)
  • Swan Districts fall out of the four for the only time all season as West Perth thrash Perth, whilst the Swans cannot counter raging Sandover favourite Edwards’ 23 kicks, 13 marks and five goals or Maurice Rioli’s 31 kicks and eleven handballs.[78]
  • Despite not kicking a goal between the eight-minute mark of the second quarter and the corresponding point of the last, East Fremantle expose numerous flaws in Claremont’s ruck and forward divisions to make a second flag look doubtful.[79]

Ladder[edit]

1989 WAFL Ladder
TEAM P W L D PF PA  % PTS
1 Claremont 21 17 4 0 2376 1724 137.82% 68
2 South Fremantle 21 16 5 0 2336 1870 124.92% 64
3 East Fremantle 21 15 6 0 2539 1982 128.1% 60
4 West Perth 21 11 10 0 2196 2146 102.33% 44
5 Swan Districts 21 10 11 0 2236 2243 99.69% 40
6 Subiaco 21 6 15 0 1971 2209 89.23% 24
7 Perth 21 6 15 0 1968 2560 76.88% 24
8 East Perth 21 3 18 0 1752 2640 66.36% 12
Key: P = Played, W = Won, L = Lost, D = Drawn, PF = Points For, PA = Points Against

Finals[edit]

Semi Finals[edit]

First Semi-Final
Saturday, 2 September East Fremantle 16.14 (110) drew with West Perth 16.14 (110) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 15,656) [80]

In his three hundredth WA(N)FL game, Brian Peake goaled from 40 metres out to produce the first senior WA(N)FL finals draw since the 1938 Grand Final.[40] As of 2014, it is East Fremantle’s only draw since 1974.[81]

First Semi-Final Replay
Saturday, 9 September (11:45 am) East Fremantle 17.17 (119) def. West Perth 9.22 (76) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 30,246) [82]
  • The replay was played as a double-header with the second semi-final, starting a tradition established in the WAFL during the 1990s.
  • West Perth’s woeful inaccuracy costs it dearly in the end after the two teams were deadlocked following six quarters of football. In the second half the Sharks’ rucks and rovers took over completely.
Second Semi-Final
Saturday, 9 September (2:15 pm) Claremont 12.17 (89) def. by South Fremantle 16.9 (105) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 30,246)

With the motivation of winning for former champion coach Clive Lewington who was dying of cancer, South Fremantle get away in the final ten minutes with three remarkable goals from Peter Matera[83]

Preliminary Final[edit]

Preliminary Final
Saturday, 16 September Claremont 17.14 (116) def. East Fremantle 12.13 (85) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 16,088)

Despite ridiculously taking to a criss-cross short-passing style after kicking the first nine goals, 31-possession Neesham and Rowland hold off East Fremantle after the Sharks kick five straight at the beginning of the final quarter to be only twelve points behind.[84]

Grand Final[edit]

Main article: 1989 WAFL Grand Final
1989 WAFL Grand Final
Saturday, 23 September South Fremantle def. by Claremont Subiaco Oval (Crowd: 38,193) [85]
0.2 (2)
1.6 (12)
5.7 (37)
5.9 (39)
Q1
Q2
Q3
Final
4.6 (30)
9.10 (64)
11.13 (79)
15.16 (106)
Umpires: D. Johnson, M. Ball
Simpson Medal: Ben Allan (Claremont)
Willie Rioli 2, Peter Matera, Geary, Macdonald Goals Brayshaw 5, Dale Kickett 3, Evans 3, Thorne 2, Mann, Allan
Edwards, Solin, Maskos, Nalder, Brad Collard Best Allan, Evans, Thorne, Neeshan, Scott, Hahn, Brayshaw

In a game expected to be close, Claremont record a crushing win via a superb defence and brilliant tagging. South Fremantle kick the lowest open-age WA(N)FL Grand Final score since 1934, with all their goals coming between the 28-minute mark of the second quarter and midway through the third. Neesham, who was superb in the packs,[85] Peter Thorne and Warren Ralph retired as players after the game.[86]


Notes[edit]

a The only other clubs to finish last in all three grades since 1957 have been Peel Thunder in their inaugural 1997 season and West Perth in 1992. No club has won premierships in all three grades in this time span.
b As with the AFL, WAFL/Westar semi- and preliminary finals have since 1991 been required to play extra time if drawn at full-time, though this has never actually occurred.
c At the Albany match the attendance figure did not include children under fifteen years of age who were admitted free of charge.
d At that time, Bill was president of the Swan Districts Football Club, a position he held from 1983 to 1994

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lewis, Ross; ‘Subi on Slippery Slope’; The West Australian, 12 June 1989, p. 112
  2. ^ Spillman, Ken; Diehards: The Story of the Subiaco Football Club 1946-2000, p. 250 ISBN 0957818505
  3. ^ a b Lewis, Ross; ‘Demons Find No Sympathy’; The West Australian, 22 May 1989, p. 104
  4. ^ a b East, Alan (2005); From Redlegs to Demons : A History of the Perth Football Club from 1899; p. 165
  5. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Commission May Regret Final Change’; The West Australian, 4 September 1989, p. 107
  6. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Public Gets Behind Double-Header’; The West Australian, 6 September 1989, p. 144
  7. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Football Needs to Spread Its Wings’; The West Australian, 29 May 1989, p. 98
  8. ^ See Stocks, Gary; ‘Eagles, WAFL Ready for Truce’; The West Australian, 19 June 1989, p. 108
  9. ^ Main, Jim and Christison, Darren; 1989 Football: The Year in Review, p. 96. Published 1989 by Century Magazines
  10. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Presidents Opposed to Eagles’ Reserves Side’; The West Australian, 28 August 1989, p. 105
  11. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Swans Have Ed Smiling’; The West Australian, 10 April 1989, p. 117
  12. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Rover Rowe a Find for Sharks’; The West Australian, 10 April 1989, p. 117
  13. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Macnish Flair Lightens Up Subi’s Gloom’; The West Australian, 10 April 1989, p. 117
  14. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Subiaco on the Rebound’; The West Australian, 17 April 1989, p. 139
  15. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘The Mark of a Champion’; The West Australian, 17 April 1989, p. 141
  16. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Jakovich Pedigree Breeds a Bulldog’; The West Australian, 17 April 1989, p. 141
  17. ^ Reid, Russell; ‘Juggling Act by Blackaby Lifts Swans’; The West Australian, 17 April 1989, p. 139
  18. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘It’s a Kalgoorlie Cracker’; The West Australian, 24 April 1989, p. 132
  19. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Demons’ Season Goes Up in Smoke’; The West Australian, 24 April 1989, p. 133
  20. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Woman’s Hand Helps Falcons’; The West Australian, 24 April 1989, p. 131
  21. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Falcons’ Win a Sign of Better Times’; The West Australian, 1 May 1989, p. 102
  22. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Royals Dredge Depths’; The West Australian, 1 May 1989, p. 102
  23. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Captain Sets Fine Example’; The West Australian, 1 May 1989, p. 103
  24. ^ Atkinson, Brian; It’s a Grand Old Flag: A History and Comprehensive Statistical Analysis of the West Perth Football Club 1885-2007; p. 151; ISBN 9781921361395
  25. ^ ‘WA Football 2000’; in Barker, Anthony J. Behind the Play: A History of Football in Western Australia; pp. 275-276 ISBN 0975242709
  26. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Star Trio Bring Demons Back to Life’; The West Australian, 8 May 1989, p. 141
  27. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Neesham Still Shows Bulldogs New Tricks’; The West Australian, 8 May 1989, p. 140
  28. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Edwards Earns Call-Up’; The West Australian, 15 May 1989, p. 103
  29. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘The Dawn of a New Walker Era’; The West Australian, 15 May 1989, p. 103
  30. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Top Marks to Claremont’; The West Australian, 15 May 1989, p. 103
  31. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Bassendean Jinx Broken by Bulldogs’; The West Australian, 22 May 1989, p. 105
  32. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Subiaco Shocked as Royals Break the Ice’; The West Australian, 22 May 1989, p. 105
  33. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Tigers Weave a Magic Spell’; The West Australian, 22 May 1989, p. 104
  34. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Falcons Sail the Heights with Sing on Song’; The West Australian, 29 May 1989, p. 100
  35. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Swans Put Demons in Doldrums’; The West Australian, 29 May 1989, p. 101
  36. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Karl a Tiger Tamer’; The West Australian, 29 May 1989, p. 99
  37. ^ Fremantle Oval: Unsuccessful Streaks
  38. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Reshuffle by Wiley Puts Lions on Deck’; The West Australian, 5 June 1989, p. 96
  39. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Falcons’ Hit by Tigers’ Thunderbolt’; The West Australian, 5 June 1989, p. 96
  40. ^ a b WAFL Match Program and Results 1989 (archived)
  41. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Scruffy Puts the Bite on Bulldogs – Lester-Smith Kicks Six as Sharks Steal Thiller’; The West Australian, 6 June 1989, pp. 124-125
  42. ^ Reid, Russell; ‘Jackson Talks Royals to Victory‘; The West Australian, 12 June 1989, p. 111
  43. ^ Denham, Greg; ‘Mick Back with Bang‘; The West Australian, 12 June 1989, p. 111
  44. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Broadbridge Strike New High as Sharks Shred Swans’ Defences’; The West Australian, 19 June 1989, pp. 104-105
  45. ^ Denham, Greg; ‘Falcons Look Good for the Final Four’; The West Australian, 19 June 1989, p. 104
  46. ^ Loxley, Steven; ‘Swans Prevail but Need All-Round Improvement’; The West Australian, 26 June 1989, p. 98
  47. ^ Reid, Russell; ‘Narkle Gives the Demons a Lift’; The West Australian, 26 June 1989, p. 98
  48. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Bulldogs Respond to Familiar Chorus’; The West Australian, 26 June 1989, p. 98
  49. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Craig Gives Bulldogs Bite’; The West Australian, 3 July 1989, p. 113
  50. ^ Loxley, Steven; ‘Ellis Puts Sharks on Right Road’; The West Australian, 3 July 1989, p. 113
  51. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘New-Look Hodyl a Master for Swans’; The West Australian, 3 July 1989, p. 112
  52. ^ Loxley, Steven; ‘Second-Quarter Nap Costs Demons Dearly’; The West Australian, 10 July 1989, p. 100
  53. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Cheers for Beers in Claremont Win’; The West Australian, 10 July 1989, p. 99
  54. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Swans Let South Scramble Home’; The West Australian, 10 July 1989, p. 100
  55. ^ Reid, Russell; ‘Langdon Sets Off a Subiaco Goal Glut’; The West Australian, 10 July 1989, p. 100
  56. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Nelson’s Grit Not Enough for Falcons’; The West Australian, 17 July 1989, p. 96
  57. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Bunton Has All the Right Moves; Checkmate for Subiaco’; The West Australian, 17 July 1989, p. 96
  58. ^ Reid, Russell; ‘Demons Kick Finals Fight Back into Life’; The West Australian, 17 July 1989, p. 97
  59. ^ Denham, Greg; ‘Tigers Breeze In for 95-Point Win’; The West Australian, 24 July 1989, p. 87
  60. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Brad the Derby Hero’; The West Australian, 24 July 1989, p. 88
  61. ^ West Perth: Lowest Scores
  62. ^ Reid, Russell; ‘Close Shave for South Fremantle’; The West Australian, 31 July 1989, p. 100
  63. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Tigers Earn Stripes; Swans Make Life Tough at the Top’; The West Australian, 31 July 1989, p. 100
  64. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: East Fremantle Team v Team
  65. ^ East Fremantle Oval: Lowest Scores
  66. ^ Denham, Greg; ‘Sharks Shatter Pathetic Perth’; The West Australian, 31 July 1989, p. 100
  67. ^ Reid, Russell; ‘Nelson Keeps Falcons Clear of Waterloo’; The West Australian, 7 August 1989, p. 92
  68. ^ Denham, Greg; ‘Game Just a Picnic for Claremont’; The West Australian, 7 August 1989, p. 90
  69. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Swans Show form; Sharks Take Honours’; The West Australian, 7 August 1989, p. 90
  70. ^ Denham, Greg; ‘Williams Kicks Super Goal To Crush Sharks’; The West Australian, 14 August 1989, p. 97
  71. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Claremont Win but at a Price’; The West Australian, 14 August 1989, p. 96
  72. ^ Reid, Russell; ‘Hobbling Shine is the Hero’; The West Australian, 14 August 1989, p. 95
  73. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘A Right Royal Letdown’; The West Australian, 14 August 1989, p. 96
  74. ^ Reid, Russell; ‘Tigers Do Just Enough to Dump the Demons’; The West Australian, 21 August 1989, p. 84
  75. ^ Denham, Greg; ‘Easy for the Sharks: Sleepy-Time Lions Go Round in Circles’; The West Australian, 21 August 1989, p. 84
  76. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Soaring Falcons Stay in Hunt’; The West Australian, 21 August 1989, p. 84
  77. ^ Reid, Russell; ‘For Falcons, Pure Joy’; The West Australian, 28 August 1989, p. 104
  78. ^ Reid, Russell; ‘For Swans, There’s Always Another Year’; The West Australian, 28 August 1989, p. 104
  79. ^ Denham, Greg; ‘Sharks Set for the Semis’; The West Australian, 28 August 1989, p. 105
  80. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Spine-Tingler Will Be Hard to Repeat’; The West Australian, 4 September 1989, p. 106
  81. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: Most Consecutive Games Between Successive Draws
  82. ^ Reid, Russell; ‘Sharks Ease Through’; The West Australian, 11 September 1989, p. 99
  83. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Bulldogs Scent the Holy Grail’; The West Australian, 11 September 1989, p. 100
  84. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Lessons Are Learnt as Tigers Head the Class’; The West Australian, 18 September 1989, p. 104
  85. ^ a b Stocks, Gary; ‘Perfect Timing by Maestro Neesham’; in The West Australian; 25 September 1989; p. 110
  86. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Thorne Thinks It’s Over’; The West Australian, 25 September 1989, p. 106

External links[edit]