1990–91 Los Angeles Lakers season

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1990–91 Los Angeles Lakers season
Western Conference Champions
Head coach Mike Dunleavy, Sr.
Owner(s) Jerry Buss
Arena Great Western Forum
Results
Record 58–24 (.707)
Place Division: 2nd (Pacific)
Conference: 3rd (Western)
Playoff finish NBA Finals
(eliminated 1–4)

Stats @ Basketball-Reference.com
Local media
Television Prime Ticket, KCAL
Radio AM 570 KLAC
< 1989–90 1991–92 >

The highlight of the Los Angeles Lakers was Magic Johnson leading the Lakers to the NBA Finals, where they lost 1–4 to Michael Jordan's Chicago Bulls. The Lakers would not return to the Finals until 2000. The season is generally considered the final season of the team's successful, uptempo Showtime era.[1][2]

The Lakers finished the regular season with a 58–24 record, but for the first time since the 1980–81 season, did not win their division. Johnson finished second behind Jordan in the voting for the NBA Most Valuable Player Award.[3] Johnson was the league's third-oldest point guard, and had grown more powerful and stronger than in his earlier years, but was also slower and less nimble.[4] Mike Dunleavy was the new head coach, the offense used more half-court sets, and the team had a renewed emphasis on defense.[5]

Draft picks[edit]

Main article: 1990 NBA Draft
Round Pick Player Position Nationality College
1 27 Elden Campbell F  United States Clemson
2 51 Tony Smith C  United States Marquette

Roster[edit]

Los Angeles Lakers 1990-91 roster
Players Coaches
Pos. # Nat. Name Ht. Wt. From
G/F 35 United States Brown, Tony (waived) 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 185 lb (84 kg) Arkansas
C 41 United States Campbell, Elden 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 215 lb (98 kg) Clemson
C 12 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Divac, Vlade 7 ft 1 in (2.16 m) 243 lb (110 kg)
G 10 United States Drew, Larry 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) 170 lb (77 kg) Missouri
F/C 45 United States Green, A. C. 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 220 lb (100 kg) Oregon State
G/F 32 United States Johnson, Magic 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 215 lb (98 kg) Michigan State
F/C 14 United States Perkins, Sam 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 235 lb (107 kg) North Carolina
G 4 United States Scott, Byron 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) 195 lb (88 kg) Arizona State
G 34 United States Smith, Tony 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) 185 lb (84 kg) Marquette
G/F 20 United States Teagle, Terry 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) 195 lb (88 kg) Baylor
F 30 United States Thomas, Irving 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 225 lb (102 kg) Florida State
F/C 43 United States Thompson, Mychal 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) 226 lb (103 kg) Minnesota
F 42 United States Worthy, James 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 225 lb (102 kg) North Carolina
Head coach




Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • (DP) Unsigned draft pick
  • (FA) Free agent
  • (S) Suspended
  • Injured Injured

Regular season[edit]

  • April 15, 1991 - Magic Johnson established the standard for most assists in a career with 9,888.[6] The previous record holder was Oscar Robertson. For the season, Magic would establish a team record with 989 assists for the season. Magic would finish the season with a career total of 9,921.

Season standings[edit]

Pacific Division W L PCT GB Home Road Div
y-Portland Trail Blazers 63 19 .768 36–5 27–14 18-10
x-Los Angeles Lakers 58 24 .707 5 33–8 25-16 19-9
x-Phoenix Suns 55 27 .671 8 32–9 23-18 17–11
x-Golden State Warriors 44 38 .537 19 30–11 14–27 13–15
x-Seattle SuperSonics 41 41 .500 22 28-13 13–28 12-16
Los Angeles Clippers 31 51 .378 32 23–18 8-33 10-18
Sacramento Kings 25 57 .305 38 24-17 1–40 9–19
y - clinched division title
x - clinched playoff spot
# Western Conference
Team W L PCT GB
1 z-Portland Trail Blazers 63 19 .768
2 y-San Antonio Spurs 55 27 .671 8
3 x-Los Angeles Lakers 58 24 .707 5
4 x-Phoenix Suns 55 27 .671 8
5 x-Utah Jazz 54 28 .659 9
6 x-Houston Rockets 52 30 .634 11
7 x-Golden State Warriors 44 38 .537 19
8 x-Seattle SuperSonics 41 41 .500 22
9 Orlando Magic 31 51 .378 32
10 Los Angeles Clippers 31 51 .378 32
11 Minnesota Timberwolves 29 53 .354 34
12 Dallas Mavericks 28 54 .341 35
13 Sacramento Kings 25 57 .305 38
14 Denver Nuggets 20 62 .244 43
z - clinched division title
y - clinched division title
x - clinched playoff spot

Game log[edit]

Playoffs[edit]

West First Round[edit]

(3) Los Angeles Lakers vs. (6) Houston Rockets: Lakers win series 3–0

Last Playoff Meeting: 1990 Western Conference First Round (Los Angeles won 3–1)

West Conference Semifinals[edit]

(3) Los Angeles Lakers vs. (7) Golden State Warriors: Lakers win series 4–1

Last Playoff Meeting: 1987 Western Conference Semifinals (Los Angeles won 4–1)

West Conference Finals[edit]

(1) Portland Trail Blazers vs. (3) Los Angeles Lakers: Lakers win series 4–2

Last Playoff Meeting: 1989 Western Conference First Round (Los Angeles won 3–0)

NBA Finals[edit]

Game 1[edit]

Sunday, June 2, at the Chicago Stadium

Team 1 2 3 4 Tot.
Los Angeles 29 22 24 18 93
Chicago 30 23 15 23 91

Game 2[edit]

Wednesday, June 5, at the Chicago Stadium The Bulls shot a Finals record 61.7% from the floor—since broken by the Orlando Magic in Game 3 of the 2009 NBA Finals—with a Jordan layup over Sam Perkins a highlight.[7]

Team 1 2 3 4 Tot.
Los Angeles 23 20 26 17 86
Chicago 28 20 38 21 107

Game 3[edit]

Friday, June 7, at the Great Western Forum

Team 1 2 3 4 OT Tot.
Chicago 25 23 18 26 12 104
Los Angeles 25 22 25 20 4 96

Game 4[edit]

Sunday, June 9, at the Great Western Forum

Team 1 2 3 4 Tot.
Chicago 27 25 22 23 97
Los Angeles 28 16 14 24 82

Game 5[edit]

Wednesday, June 12, at the Great Western Forum

The Lakers were facing elimination, and the lack of Worthy and Scott was not any help to the Lakers. This would not stop Magic Johnson as Johnson had 20 assists in the game, but it was not enough. Elden Campbell outscored Michael Jordan with 13 points in the first half, but it was not enough. The Lakers still fought and even led 93-90 in the fourth quarter, but a Bulls 9-0 run, and Paxson's 10 points in the final half of the fourth quarter helped secure the Chicago Bulls, and Michael Jordan's, first NBA title.

Team 1 2 3 4 Tot.
Chicago 27 21 32 28 108
Los Angeles 25 24 31 21 101

Player stats[edit]

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field-goal percentage  3P%  3-point field-goal percentage  FT%  Free-throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game

Season[edit]

Player GP REB AST STL BLK PTS AVG
Elden Campbell
Vlade Divac
A. C. Green 82 516 71 59 23 750 9.1
Terry Teagle
James Worthy

Playoffs[edit]

Awards and Records[edit]

Transactions[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Price, Victoria (2000). "The Los Angeles Lakers". St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture. Farmington Hills, Michigan: The Gale Group Inc. Retrieved December 7, 2012 – via HighBeam Research. (subscription required (help)). Some see the big man's retirement as the end of Showtime, others cite Pat Riley's departure the following year, but most Lakers' fans feel that Showtime came to an end when Magic Johnson announced that he was HIV-positive. 
  2. ^ "'Magic'al Mystery Tour Over". Times-Union (Warsaw, Indiana). January 30, 1996. p. 7A. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Amid Pressing Matters, Jordan Accepts M.V.P.". New York Times. May 21, 1991. 
  4. ^ Perlman, Jeff (2014). Showtime: Magic, Kareem, Riley, and the Los Angeles Lakers Dynasty of the 1980s. Gotham Books. p. 397. ISBN 978-1-59240-755-2. 
  5. ^ Aldridge, Dave (June 2, 1991). "Johnson Not Ready To Pass Mantle; For 9th Time, Lakers Show Magic Touch". The Washington Post. Retrieved December 7, 2012 – via HighBeam Research. (subscription required (help)). But after a slow start under new coach Mike Dunleavy, Los Angeles found out that new weapons and new emphasis on defense could take it to the same place as Showtime did during the 1980s. 
  6. ^ "Magic Breaks Record for Assists". New York Times. April 16, 1991. 
  7. ^ "Legendary Dunk Change Lay Up" from all Angles on YouTube

External links[edit]