1990 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1990 throughout the world.

Champions[edit]

Major League Baseball[edit]

League Championship Series
CBS
World Series
CBS
           
East Boston Red Sox 0
West Oakland Athletics 4
AL Oakland Athletics 0
NL Cincinnati Reds 4
East Pittsburgh Pirates 2
West Cincinnati Reds 4

Other champions[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

MLB statistical leaders[edit]

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG George Brett KCR .329 Willie McGee STL .335
HR Cecil Fielder DET 51 Ryne Sandberg CHC 40
RBI Cecil Fielder DET 132 Matt Williams SFG 122
Wins Bob Welch OAK 27 Doug Drabek PIT 22
ERA Roger Clemens BOS 1.93 Danny Darwin HOU 2.21
Ks Nolan Ryan TEX 232 David Cone NYM 233

Major league baseball final standings[edit]

Managers[edit]

American League[edit]

Team Manager Comments
Baltimore Orioles Frank Robinson
Boston Red Sox Joe Morgan
California Angels Doug Rader
Chicago White Sox Jeff Torborg
Cleveland Indians John McNamara
Detroit Tigers Sparky Anderson
Kansas City Royals John Wathan
Milwaukee Brewers Tom Trebelhorn
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly
New York Yankees Bucky Dent Replaced during the season by Stump Merrill
Oakland Athletics Tony La Russa Won AL Pennant
Seattle Mariners Jim Lefebvre
Texas Rangers Bobby Valentine
Toronto Blue Jays Cito Gaston

National League[edit]

Team Manager Comments
Atlanta Braves Russ Nixon Replaced during the season by Bobby Cox
Chicago Cubs Don Zimmer
Cincinnati Reds Lou Piniella Won the World Series
Houston Astros Art Howe
Los Angeles Dodgers Tommy Lasorda
Montreal Expos Buck Rodgers
New York Mets Davey Johnson Replaced during the season by Bud Harrelson
Philadelphia Phillies Nick Leyva
Pittsburgh Pirates Jim Leyland
St. Louis Cardinals Whitey Herzog Replaced during the season by Joe Torre
San Diego Padres Jack McKeon Replaced during the season by Greg Riddoch
San Francisco Giants Roger Craig

Events[edit]

January–April[edit]

May–August[edit]

September–December[edit]

Births[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January[edit]

  • January 1 - Carmen Hill, 94, pitcher for three National League teams from 1915 through 1930, who won 22 games in 1927 for the league champions Pittsburgh Pirates
  • January 2 - Bill Beckmann, 82, pitcher who posted a 21-25 record with a 4.79 ERA in 90 games for the Philadelphia Athletics and St. Louis Cardinals from 1939 through 1942
  • January 4 - Bobby Balcena, 74, outfielder for the Cincinnati Reds, who during the 1956 season became the first player of Filipino ancestry to appear in a major league game.
  • January 4 - Bonnie Hollingsworth, 94, pitcher who posted a 4-9 record with a 4.91 ERA in 36 games for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Washington Senators, Brooklyn Robins and Boston Braves from 1922 to 1928
  • January 6 - Walter Anderson, 92, relief pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics during the 1917 and 1919 seasons
  • January 7 - Horace Stoneham, 86, owner of the Giants from 1936 to 1976 who moved the team from New York City to San Francisco for the 1958 season; the team won five NL pennants and the 1954 World Series during his tenure.
  • January 7 - Shag Thompson, 92, backup outfielder who hit .203 in 48 games for the Philadelphia Athletics from 1914 to 1916
  • January 9 - Spud Chandler, 82, All-Star pitcher for the New York Yankees who was the AL's MVP in a 20-4 season in 1943; owned career .717 winning percentage.
  • January 13 - Roy Jarvis, 63, catcher who played for the Brooklyn Dodgers and Pittsburgh Pirates between 1944 and 1947
  • January 16 - Earl Naylor, 70, backup outfielder for the Philadelphia Phillies (1942–43) and Brooklyn Dodgers (1946)

February[edit]

  • February 3 - Erv Kantlehner, 97, pitcher who posted a 13-29 record with a 2.84 in 87 games for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Philadelphia Phillies from 1914 to 1916
  • February 10 - Tony Solaita, 43, first baseman regarded as the only native Samoan ever to play in the majors, who hit .255 with 50 home runs and 203 RBI in 525 games for the Yankees, Royals, Angels and Expos between 1968 and 1979
  • February 17 - Larry Cox, 42, backup catcher who hit .221 in 382 games with the Phillies, Mariners, Cubs and Rangers (1973–81); later a minor league manager (1983–87) and bullpen coach for the Cubs (1988–89)
  • February 20 - Cecil Garriott, 73, pinch-hitter for the 1946 Chicago Cubs
  • February 24 - Tony Conigliaro, 45, All-Star right fielder for the Boston Red Sox who at age 20 became the youngest player ever to win a home run title, but never fully recovered from being hit in the face by a pitch two years later.
  • February 27 - Vern Freiburger, 66, first baseman for the 1941 Cleveland Indians

March[edit]

  • March 1 - Creepy Crespi, 72, second baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals during four seasons, including the 1942 World Champion team.
  • March 6 - Joe Sewell, 91, Hall of Fame shortstop for the Cleveland Indians and New York Yankees who batted .312 lifetime and struck out only 114 times in more than 8,300 plate appearances; led AL in doubles in 1924, and in putouts and assists four times each.
  • March 9 - Lou Vedder, 92, relief pitcher who appeared in one game for the 1920 Detroit Tigers.
  • March 11 - Roy Schalk, 81, second baseman for the Chicago White Sox from 1944 to 1945.
  • March 23 - Margaret Holgerson, 63, All-American Girls Professional Baseball League pitcher who posted a 76-69 record and a 1.94 ERA in seven seasons and hurled a postseason no-hitter.
  • March 26 - Chet Brewer, 83, All-Star pitcher of the Negro Leagues, later a scout for the Pirates.
  • March 28 - Johnny Neun, 89, first baseman for the Detroit Tigers and Boston Braves from 1925 to 1931, who in 1927 completed the seventh unassisted triple play in major league history.
  • March 29 - Phil Masi, 74, a four-time All-Star catcher who played for the Boston Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates and Chicago White Sox between 1939 and 1952.

April[edit]

  • April 8 - Bill Kelly, 91, first baseman who led the International League in RBI three times (1924–26) and in home runs twice (1924, 1926); played briefly for the Philadelphia Athletics and Philadelphia Phillies in the 1920, and later managed and umpired in the minors
  • April 12 - Johnny Reder, 80, Polish sportsman who was a goalkeeper for several American Soccer League teams; played at first base for the 1932 Boston Red Sox, and also was named the New York–Penn League MVP in 1935 while playing with the Williamsport Grays
  • April 18 - John Antonelli, 74, who spent 70 years in baseball, debuting in 1935 as player/manager in minor leagues at age of 16, appearing at third base in 133 games with the Cardinals and Phillies from 1944 to 1945, and later playing, managing, coaching and instructing in the minors through 1985
  • April 29 - Ray Poat, 72, pitcher who posted a 22-30 record with a 4.55 ERA in 116 games for the Cleveland Indians, New York Giants and Pittsburgh Pirates from 1942 through 1949
  • April 21 - Johnny Beazley, 71, who went 21–6 with a 2.13 ERA in his 1942 rookie season for the Cardinals and pitched two complete-game wins in the team's World Series over the Yankees.

May[edit]

  • May   4 - Jim Schelle, 73, pitcher for the 1939 Philadelphia Athletics
  • May 16 - Pretzel Pezzullo, 79, relief pitcher who posted a 3-5 record with a 6.36 ERA and one save in 42 games for the Philadelphia Phillies from 1935 to 1936
  • May 23 - Charlie Keller, 73, five-time All-Star left fielder for the New York Yankees who hit 30 home runs three times.
  • May 24 - José Del Vecchio, 73, Venezuelan sports medicine specialist and youth baseball pioneer in his country
  • May 24 - Augie Donatelli, 75, National League umpire from 1950 to 1973 who initiated that league's trend toward a low strike zone, and spearheaded the formation of the first umpires' union.
  • May 31 - Charlie Shoemaker, 50, backup infielder who hit .258 in 28 games for the Kansas City Athletics between 1961 and 1964

June[edit]

  • June 8 - Neb Stewart, 72, backup outfielder who hit .129 in 10 games for the 1940 Philadelphia Phillies
  • June 12 - Glen Gorbous, 59, Canadian outfielder who hit .238 in 117 games with the Cincinnati Reds and Philadelphia Phillies from 1955 to 1957
  • June 12 - George McNamara, backup outfielder who hit .273 in three games with the 1922 Washington Senators
  • June 12 - Jim Walkup, 94, relief pitcher for the 1927 Detroit Tigers
  • June 15 - Bucky Jacobs, 77, relief pitcher who posted a 1-2 record with a 4.91 ERA in 22 games for the Washington Senators between 1937 and 1940
  • June 27 - Joe O'Rourke, 85, pinch-hitter for the 1929 Philadelphia Phillies
  • June 29 - Boyd Perry, 76, backup infielder who hit .181 in 36 games for the 1941 Detroit Tigers

July[edit]

  • July 7 - Don Bessent, 59, relief pitcher who posted a 14-7 record with a 4.08 ERA and 12 saves in 108 games for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers from 1955 through 1958
  • July 10 - Henry Coppola, 77, middle-relief pitcher who was 3-4 with a 5.65 ERA and one save for the Washington Senators from 1935 to 1936
  • July 24 - Andy Woehr, 94, backup third baseman who hit .274 in 63 games with the Philadelphia Phillies from 1923 to 1924
  • July 28 - Red Barrett, 75, All-Star pitcher for three NL teams who set a major league record for the fewest pitches (58) in a nine-inning game in 1944; led NL in wins in 1945.

August[edit]

  • August 3 - Bob Brown, 79, pitcher who posted a 16-21 record with a 4.48 ERA in 79 appearances with the Boston Braves/Bees from 1930 to 1936
  • August 10 - Cookie Lavagetto, 77, All-Star third baseman who, with the Brooklyn Dodgers, spoiled a Yankee no-hitter with two out in the ninth inning of Game Four in the 1947 World Series, hitting a game-winning double; later managed the Senators and Twins.
  • August 12 - Fay Thomas, 86, pitcher for the New York Giants, Cleveland Indians, Brooklyn Dodgers and St. Louis Browns between 1927 and 1935, who also appeared in the 1942 film The Pride of the Yankees as Christy Mathewson
  • August 15 - Bob Garbark, 80, backup catcher who hit .248 in 145 games with the Indians, Cubs, Athletics and Red Sox between 1934 and 1945
  • August 21 - Bill Lasley, 88, relief pitcher who appeared in two games for the 1924 St. Louis Browns
  • August 21 - Bob Uhl, 76, relief pitcher who played for the Chicago White Sox (1938) and Detroit Tigers (1940)
  • August 24 - Mickey Witek, 74, second baseman who hit .277 with 22 home runs and 196 RBI in 580 games for the New York Giants from 1940 to 1949
  • August 28 - Larry Jackson, 59, All-Star pitcher who won 194 games for the Cardinals, Cubs and Phillies; led NL in wins in 1964.
  • August 30 - Lou Garland, 85, pitcher who posted a 0-2 record for the 1931 Chicago White Sox

September[edit]

  • September 1 - Buster Adams, 75, backup outfielder who hit .266 with 50 home runs and 249 RBI in 576 games for the Cardinals and Phillies from 1939 through 1947
  • September 2 - Mark Mauldin, 75, backup third baseman who hit .263 with one home run and thrre RBI in 10 games for the 1934 Chicago White Sox
  • September 3 - Marshall Bridges, 59, relief pitcher who posted a 23-15 record with a 3.75 ERA and 25 saves in 206 games with the Cardinals, Reds, Yankees and Senators from 1959 to 1965, who during the 1962 World Series became the first American League pitcher to cough up a grand slam in Series history
  • September 6 - Al Veach, 81, pitcher who posted a 0-2 record for the 1935 Philadelphia Athletics
  • September 8 - Joe Gleason, 81, pitcher who posted a 2-2 record in 11 games for the Washington Senators in 1920 and 1922
  • September 9 - Doc Cramer, 85, five-time All-Star center fielder for four AL teams who collected 2,705 hits and was a defensive standout; the only AL player to twice go 6-for-6 in a nine-inning game.
  • September 12 - Jim Romano, 63, pitcher who appeared in three games for the 1950 Brooklyn Dodgers
  • September 20 - Dick Gyselman, 82, backup infielder who hit .225 in 82 games for the Boston Braves from 1933 to 1934
  • September 23 - Betty Warfel, 62, pitcher and infielder who played for two All-American Girls Professional Baseball League champion teams spanning 1948-1949
  • September 24 - Johnny Werts, 92, pitcher who posted a 15-21 record with a 4.29 ERA in 88 games for the Boston Braves from 1926 through 1929
  • September 29 - Al McLean, 78, relief pitcher for the Washington Senators during the 1935 season
  • September 30 - Nels Potter, 79, pitcher who posted a 92-97 record with a 3.99 ERA in 349 appearances for the Cardinals, Athletics, Red Sox, Browns and Braves from 1936 to 1949

October[edit]

  • October 2 - Heinie Schuble, 83, backup infielder who hit .251 with 11 home runs and 116 RBI in 332 games for the Cardinals and Tigers between 1927 and 1936
  • October 4 - Vance Dinges, 75, backup first baseman/outfielder who hit .291 with two home runs and 46 RBI in 159 games for the Philadelphia Phillies from 1945 to 1946
  • October 5 - Dixie Howell, 70, utility catcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Cincinnati Reds and Brooklyn Dodgers between 1947 and 1956
  • October 7 - Walt Ripley, 73, relief pitcher who played briefly for the 1935 Boston Red Sox
  • October 10 - George Barnicle, 73, pitcher who posted a 3-3 record with a 6.55 ERA in 20 games with the Boston Bees/Braves from 1939 to 1941
  • October 10 - Wally Moses, 80, All-Star right fielder for the Athletics, White Sox and Red Sox who hit .300 in his first seven seasons, led AL in doubles and triples once each.
  • October 13 - Lino Donoso, 78, Cuban pitcher who posted a 4-6 record with a 5.21 ERA in 28 games for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1955 to 1956
  • October 18 - Nick Etten, 77, All-Star first baseman who hit .277 with 89 home runs and 526 RBI in 937 games with three teams from 1938 to 1946; led American League in home runs (1944) and RBI (1945), and also was a member of the 1943 World Champion New York Yankees
  • October 21 - Frank Waddey, 85, outfielder who hit .273 in 14 games with the 1931 St. Louis Browns
  • October 24 - Jim Clark, 63, backup infielder who hit .250 in nine games for the 1948 Washington Senators

November[edit]

  • November 3 - Jack Russell, 85, All-Star relief pitcher who won 85 games for six teams from 1926 to 1940; twice led American League in saves (1933–34), and later became instrumental in raising money to build a baseball stadium, Jack Russell Memorial Stadium, which became the spring training home of the Phillies in 1955
  • November 8 - Earl Torgeson, 66, first baseman who hit .389 in 1948 World Series with Boston Braves, led NL in runs in 1950.
  • November 10 - Aurelio Monteagudo, 46, Cuban pitcher with five teams who also gained renown for pitching in the Venezuelan and Mexican leagues.
  • November 12 - Junior Walsh, 71, middle-relief pitcher who posted a 4-10 record with a 5.88 ERA and two saves for the Pittsburgh Pirates between the 1946 and 1951 seasons
  • November 22 - Joe Bowman, 80, pitcher for the Athletics, Giants, Phillies, Pirates, Red Sox, and Reds between 1932 and 1945.
  • November 23 - Baudilio "Bo" Díaz, 37, All-Star catcher, most notably with the Phillies and Reds, who batted .333 in the 1983 World Series.
  • November 28 - Tommy Hughes, 71, pitcher who posted a 31-56 record with a .392 ERA in 144 games with the Phillies and Reds between 1941 and 1948

December[edit]

  • December 2 - Paddy Smith, 96, backup catcher who played for the 1920 Boston Red Sox
  • December 7 - Lew Flick, 75, backup outfielder who hit .175 in 20 games for the Philadelphia Athletics from 1943 to 1944
  • December 15 - Bill Otis, 100, backup outfielder who appeared in four games with the 1912 New York Highlanders
  • December 16 - Wally Flager, 69, shortstop who hit .241 with two home runs and 21 RBI in 70 games for the Reds and Phillies during the 1945 season
  • December 18 - Charlie Gibson, 91, backup catcher who hit .133 in 12 games for the 1924 Philadelphia Athletics
  • December 28 - Shirley Crites, 56, AAGPBL infielder for the 1953 pennant-winning Fort Wayne Daisies

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cincinnati Enquirer Pete Rose timeline". Archived from the original on 2009-08-14. Retrieved 2009-08-11.