1991 Giro d'Italia

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1991 Giro d'Italia
Race details
Dates May 26 — June 16
Stages 21, including one split stage
Distance 3,715 km (2,308 mi)
Winning time 99h 35' 43" (37.303 km/h or 23.179 mph)
Palmares
Winner  Franco Chioccioli (ITA) (Del Tongo-MG Boys Maglificio)
Second  Claudio Chiappucci (ITA) (Carrera Jeans-Tassoni)
Third  Massimiliano Lelli (ITA) (Ariostea)

Points  Claudio Chiappucci (ITA) (Carrera Jeans-Tassoni)
Mountains  Iñaki Gastón (ESP) (CLAS-Cajastur)
Youth  Massimiliano Lelli (ITA) (Ariostea)
Intergiro  Alberto Leanizbarrutia (ESP) (CLAS-Cajastur)
Team Carrera Jeans-Tassoni
1990
1992

The 1991 Giro d'Italia was the 74th edition of the Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tours. The Giro began on May 26 with a mass-start stage that began and ended in the Italian city of Olbia. The race came to a close in Milan on June 16. Twenty teams entered the race, which was won by the Italian Franco Chioccioli of the Del Tongo-MG Boys Maglificio team. Second and third respectively were the Italians Claudio Chiappucci and Massimiliano Lelli.[1][2][3][4]

In the race's other classifications, Massimiliano Lelli of the Ariostea team finished as the best rider aged 25 or under in the general classification, finishing in third place overall; Carrera Jeans-Tassoni rider Claudio Chiappucci won the points classification, Iñaki Gastón of the CLAS-Cajastur team won the mountains classification, and CLAS-Cajastur rider Alberto Leanizbarrutia won the intergiro classification. Carrera Jeans-Tassoni finished as the winners of the Trofeo Fast Team classification, ranking each of the twenty teams contesting the race by lowest cumulative time.

Teams[edit]

A group of cyclists riding up an inclined road.
The peloton riding up the Sestriere during stage 13.

A total of 20 teams were invited to participate in the 1991 Giro d'Italia. Each team sent a squad of nine riders, so the Giro began with a peloton of 180 cyclists. Out of the 180 riders that started this edition of the Giro d'Italia, a total of 133 riders made it to the finish in Milan.

The 20 teams that took part in the race were:

  • CLAS-Cajastur
  • Pony Malta-Avianca
  • Selle Italia-Magniarredo-Vetta
  • Seur
  • TVM-Sanyo
  • ZG Mobili
  • Z

Route and stages[edit]

A mountain in the distance.
The nineteenth stage, a 192 km (119 mi) mass-start stage, began in Savigliano and finished in the mountainous village Sestriere (pictured).

The route for the 1991 edition of the Giro d'Italia was revealed to the public on television by head organizer Vincenzo Torriani, on 2 December 1990.[5] It contained three time trial events, all of which were individual.[5] There were twelve stages containing categorized climbs, of which five had summit finishes: stage 12, to Pian del Re;[6] stage 13, to Sestriere;[7] stage 15, to Aprica;[8] stage 16, to Selva di Val Gardena;[9] and stage 17, to Passo Pordoi.[10] The organizers chose to include one rest day, which was used to transfer the riders from Cagliari to Sorrento.[5] When compared to the previous year's race, the race was 265 km (165 mi) shorter, contained one more rest day, and the same number of individual time trials and split-stages. In addition, this race contained one more stage.

Stage characteristics and winners[5]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
1 26 May Olbia to Olbia 193 km (120 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Philippe Casado (FRA)
2a 27 May Olbia to Sassari 127 km (79 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Gianni Bugno (ITA)
2b Sassari 7 km (4 mi) Individual time trial  Gianluca Pierobon (ITA)
3 28 May Sassari to Cagliari 231 km (144 mi) Plain stage  Mario Cipollini (ITA)
29 May Rest day
4 30 May Sorrento to Sorrento 170 km (106 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Éric Boyer (FRA)
5 31 May Sorrento to Scanno 246 km (153 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Marino Lejarreta (ESP)
6 1 June Scanno to Rieti 205 km (127 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Vladimir Poulnikov (URS)
7 2 June Rieti to Città di Castello 174 km (108 mi) Plain stage  Mario Cipollini (ITA)
8 3 June Città di Castello to Prato 169 km (105 mi) Plain stage  Davide Cassani (ITA)
9 4 June Prato to Felino 229 km (142 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Massimo Ghirotto (ITA)
10 5 June Collecchio to Langhirano 43 km (27 mi) Individual time trial  Gianni Bugno (ITA)
11 6 June Sala Baganza to Savona 223 km (139 mi) Plain stage  Maximilian Sciandri (ITA)
12 7 June Savona to Pian del Re 182 km (113 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Massimiliano Lelli (ITA)
13 8 June Savigliano to Sestriere 192 km (119 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Eduardo Chozas (ESP)
14 9 June Turin to Morbegno 239 km (149 mi) Plain stage  Franco Ballerini (ITA)
15 10 June Morbegno to Aprica 132 km (82 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Franco Chioccioli (ITA)
16 11 June Tirano to Selva di Val Gardena 220 km (137 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Massimiliano Lelli (ITA)
17 12 June Selva di Val Gardena to Passo Pordoi 169 km (105 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Franco Chioccioli (ITA)
18 13 June Pozza di Fassa to Castelfranco Veneto 165 km (103 mi) Plain stage  Silvio Martinello (ITA)
19 14 June Castelfranco Veneto to Brescia 185 km (115 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Gianni Bugno (ITA)
20 15 June Broni to Casteggio 66 km (41 mi) Individual time trial  Franco Chioccioli (ITA)
21 16 June Pavia to Milan 153 km (95 mi) Plain stage  Mario Cipollini (ITA)
Total 3,715 km (2,308 mi)

Classification Leadership[edit]

Five different jerseys were worn during the 1991 Giro d'Italia. The leader of the general classification – calculated by adding the stage finish times of each rider, and allowing time bonuses for the first three finishers on mass-start stages – wore a pink jersey. This classification is the most important of the race, and its winner is considered as the winner of the Giro.[11]

A picture of a mountain.
The Pordoi Pass was the Cima Coppi for the 1991 running of the Giro d'Italia.

For the points classification, which awarded a purple (or cyclamen) jersey to its leader, cyclists were given points for finishing a stage in the top 15; additional points could also be won in intermediate sprints. The green jersey was awarded to the mountains classification leader. In this ranking, points were won by reaching the summit of a climb ahead of other cyclists. Each climb was ranked as either first, second or third category, with more points available for higher category climbs. The Cima Coppi, the race's highest point of elevation, awarded more points than the other first category climbs.[11] The Cima Coppi for this Giro was the Passo Pordoi. It was crossed twice by the riders, for the first climbing of the mountain, Italian Franco Vona was the first over the climb, while Franco Chioccioli was first over the second passing. The white jersey was worn by the leader of young rider classification, a ranking decided the same way as the general classification, but only riders born after 1 January 1969 were eligible for it.[11]

The intergiro classification was marked by a blue jersey.[11] The calculation for the intergiro is similar to that of the general classification, in each stage there is a midway point that the riders pass through a point and where their time is stopped. As the race goes on, their times compiled and the person with the lowest time is the leader of the intergiro classification and wears the blue jersey.[11] Although no jersey was awarded, there was also one classification for the teams, in which the stage finish times of the best three cyclists per team were added; the leading team was the one with the lowest total time.[11]

The rows in the following table correspond to the jerseys awarded after that stage was run.

Classification leadership by stage
Stage Winner General classification
Points classification
Mountains classification
Young rider classification
Intergiro classification
Trofeo Fast Team
1 Philippe Casado Philippe Casado Philippe Casado  ?  ?  ? Selle Italia-Magniarredo-Vetta
2a Gianluca Pierobon Franco Chioccioli Franco Chioccioli Carrera Jeans-Tassoni
2b Mario Cipollini
3 Eduardo Chozas
4 Éric Boyer Éric Boyer Claudio Chiappucci Z
5 Marino Lejarreta Franco Chioccioli ONCE
6 Vladimir Poulnikov Franco Chioccioli Carrera Jeans-Tassoni
7 Mario Cipollini Claudio Chiappucci
8 Davide Cassani
9 Massimo Ghirotto
10 Gianni Bugno
11 Maximilian Sciandri
12 Massimiliano Lelli
13 Eduardo Chozas
14 Franco Ballerini
15 Franco Chioccioli ONCE
16 Massimiliano Lelli
17 Franco Chioccioli Carrera Jeans-Vagabond
18 Silvio Martinello
19 Gianni Bugno
20 Franco Chioccioli
21 Mario Cipollini
Final Franco Chioccioli Claudio Chiappucci Iñaki Gastón Massimiliano Lelli Alberto Leanizbarrutia Carrera Jeans-Tassoni

Final Standings[edit]

Legend
  A pink jersey   Denotes the winner of the General classification[12]   A green jersey   Denotes the winner of the Mountains classification[12]
  A purple jersey   Denotes the winner of the Points classification[12]   A white jersey   Denotes the winner of the Young rider classification[12]
  A blue jersey   Denotes the winner of the Intergiro classification[12]

General classification[edit]

Final general classification (1–10)
Rank Name Team Time
1  Franco Chioccioli (ITA) Pink jersey Del Tongo-MG Boys Maglificio 99h 35' 43"
2  Claudio Chiappucci (ITA) A purple jersey Carrera Jeans-Tassoni + 3' 48"
3  Massimiliano Lelli (ITA) A white jersey Ariostea + 6' 56"
4  Gianni Bugno (ITA) Chateau d'Ax-Gatorade + 7' 49"
5  Marino Lejarreta (ESP) ONCE + 10' 23"
6  Éric Boyer (FRA) Z + 11' 09"
7  Leonardo Sierra (VEN) Selle Italia-Magniarredo-Vetta + 11' 56"
8  Marco Giovannetti (ITA) Chateau d'Ax-Gatorade + 13' 03"
9  Zenon Jaskuła (POL) Del Tongo-MG Boys Maglificio + 18' 22"
10  Eduardo Chozas Olmo (ESP) ONCE + 23' 42"

Points classification[edit]

Rider Team Points
1  Claudio Chiappucci (ITA) A purple jersey Carrera Jeans-Tassoni 283
2  Franco Chioccioli (ITA) Pink jersey Del Tongo-MG Boys Maglificio 239
3  Mario Cipollini (ITA) Del Tongo-MG Boys Maglificio 191
4  Gianni Bugno (ITA) Chateau d'Ax-Gatorade 189
5  Marino Lejarreta (ESP) ONCE 143
6  Massimiliano Lelli (ITA) A white jersey Ariostea 131
7  Jean-François Bernard (FRA) Banesto 124
8  Éric Boyer (FRA) Z 115
9  Gianluca Bortolami (ITA) Colnago-Lampre 110
10  Silvio Martinello (ITA) Italbonifica-Navigare 94

Mountains classification[edit]

Rider Team Points
1  Iñaki Gastón (ESP) A green jersey CLAS-Cajastur 75
2  Claudio Chiappucci (ITA) A purple jersey Carrera Jeans-Tassoni 69
3  Franco Chioccioli (ITA) Pink jersey Del Tongo-MG Boys Maglificio 57
4  Acacio da Silva (POR) Lotus-Festina 46
5  Massimiliano Lelli (ITA) A white jersey Ariostea 38
6  Marino Lejarreta (ESP) ONCE 26
7  Gianni Bugno (ITA) Chateau d'Ax-Gatorade 19
8  Marco Giovannetti (ITA) Chateau d'Ax-Gatorade 18
9  Franco Vona (ITA) Jolly Componibili-Club 88 14
 Eduardo Chozas (ESP) ONCE
 Francisco Espinosa (ESP) CLAS-Cajastur

Young rider classification[edit]

Rider Team Time
1  Massimiliano Lelli (ITA) A white jersey Ariostea 99h 42' 39"
2  Leonardo Sierra (VEN) Selle Italia-Magniarredo-Vetta + 5' 00"
3  Gianluca Bortolami (ITA) Colnago-Lampre + 27' 36"
4  Santos Hernández (ESP) ONCE + 36' 53"
5  Stefano Della Santa (ITA) Amore & Vita-Fanini + 55' 16"

Intergiro classification[edit]

Rider Team Time
1  Alberto Leanizbarrutia (ESP) A blue jersey LAS-Cajastur 59h 34' 55"
2  Claudio Chiappucci (ITA) A purple jersey Carrera Jeans-Tassoni + 9' 36"
3  Franco Chioccioli (ITA) Pink jersey Del Tongo-MG Boys Maglificio + 9' 39"
4  Gianni Bugno (ITA) Chateau d'Ax-Gatorade + 10' 10"
5  Marino Lejarreta (ESP) ONCE + 11' 12"

Trofeo Fast Team classification[edit]

Team Time
1 Carrera Jeans-Tassoni 299h 49' 51"
2 ONCE + 4' 40"
3 Chateau d'Ax-Gatorade + 21' 40"
4 Banesto + 35' 07"
5 CLAS-Cajastur + 54' 57"
6 Z + 57' 25"
7 Del Tongo-MG Boys Maglificio + 1h 38' 21"
8 Ariostea + 1h 41' 52"
9 Lotus-Festina + 1h 52' 00"
10 Pony Malta-Avianca + 1h 59' 12"

References[edit]

  1. ^ ""Coppino" se convirtió en Chioccioli" ["Coppino" became Chioccioli] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 17 June 1991. p. 34. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  2. ^ ""Coppino" se convirtió en Chioccioli" ["Coppino" became Chioccioli] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 17 June 1991. p. 35. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  3. ^ "¡Franco, Franco, Franco!" [¡Franco, Franco, Franco!] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 17 June 1991. p. 47. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  4. ^ "Lejarreta: ¡Por fin llegó el relax!" [Lejarreta: relax finally arrived!] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 17 June 1991. p. 49. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Un giro para escaladores" [A Tour for climbers] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 3 December 1990. p. 80. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  6. ^ "La etapa de hoy" [Today's stage] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 7 June 1991. p. 42. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  7. ^ "La etapa de hoy" [Today's stage] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 8 June 1991. p. 45. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  8. ^ "La etapa de hoy" [Today's stage] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 10 June 1991. p. 63. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  9. ^ "La etapa de hoy" [Today's stage] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 11 June 1991. p. 43. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  10. ^ "La etapa de hoy" [Today's stage] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 12 June 1991. p. 45. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f Laura Weislo (13 May 2008). "Giro d'Italia classifications demystified". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 13 July 2013. 
  12. ^ a b c d e "Clasificaciones" [Classifications] (PDF) (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 17 June 1991. p. 48. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012.