1992 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships

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1992 IIHF World U20 Championship
Tournament details
Host country  Germany
Dates December 26 - January 4
Teams 8
Venue(s) (in 2 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg  CIS (1st title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg  Sweden
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg  United States
Fourth place  Finland
Tournament statistics
Matches played 28
Goals scored 215 (7.68 per match)
Scoring leader(s) Sweden Michael Nylander (17 points)
1991
1993

The 1992 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships (1992 WJHC) was the 16th edition of the World Junior Ice Hockey Championships and was held from December 26, 1991 until January 4, 1992. It was held in Füssen and Kaufbeuren, Germany. The Commonwealth of Independent States won gold, while Sweden won silver, and the United States took home the bronze medal.

Final standings[edit]

The 1992 tournament was a round-robin format, with the top three teams winning gold, silver and bronze medals respectively.

The day the tournament began, the Soviet Union formally dissolved. In the week that followed the team continued to play as the Soviet Union, but on January 1, 1992, the team was renamed the Commonwealth of Independent States.[1] The team had no new flag to fly at the tournament, and continued to use their Soviet jerseys through to its conclusion. [2]

Rank Team GP W L T GF GA PTS
1st  Commonwealth of Independent States 7 6 1 0 39 13 12
2nd  Sweden 7 5 1 1 41 24 11
3rd  United States 7 5 2 0 30 22 10
4  Finland 7 3 3 1 22 21 7
5  Czechoslovakia 7 3 4 0 28 25 6
6  Canada 7 2 3 2 21 30 6
7  Germany 7 1 6 0 15 40 2
8  Switzerland 7 1 6 0 19 40 2

Switzerland was relegated to Pool B for 1993.

Results[edit]

December 26, 1991 Canada  5 – 4
 Germany Füssen
December 26, 1991 Sweden  8 – 4
 Czechoslovakia Füssen
December 26, 1991 Soviet Union  10 – 2
 Switzerland Kaufbeuren
December 26, 1991 United States  5 – 1
 Finland Füssen
December 27, 1991 Canada  6 – 4
 Switzerland Füssen
December 27, 1991 Finland  5 – 1
 Czechoslovakia Kaufbeuren
December 27, 1991 Soviet Union  4 – 3
 Sweden Füssen
December 27, 1991 United States  6 – 2
 Germany Füssen
December 29, 1991 Canada  2 – 2
 Sweden Kaufbeuren
December 29, 1991 Soviet Union  4 – 1
 Finland Füssen
December 29, 1991 Czechoslovakia  8 – 2
 Germany Füssen
December 29, 1991 United States  5 – 1
 Switzerland Füssen
December 30, 1991 Finland  2 – 2
 Canada Füssen
December 30, 1991 Switzerland  4 – 2
 Czechoslovakia Füssen
December 31, 1991 Soviet Union  7 – 0
 Germany Füssen
December 31, 1991 Sweden  8 – 6
 United States Kaufbeuren
January 1, 1992 United States  5 – 3
 Canada Füssen
January 1, 1992 Sweden  4 – 3
 Switzerland Füssen
January 1, 1992 Finland  2 – 0
 Germany Kaufbeuren
January 1, 1992 Czechoslovakia  5 – 2
 CIS Füssen
January 2, 1992 Czechoslovakia  6 – 1
 Canada Füssen
January 2, 1992 Finland  7 – 3
 Switzerland Füssen
January 2, 1992 Sweden  10 – 1
 Germany Füssen
January 2, 1992 CIS Commonwealth of Independent States 5 – 0
 United States Kaufbeuren
January 4, 1992 CIS Commonwealth of Independent States 7 – 2
 Canada Füssen
January 4, 1992 Sweden  6 – 4
 Finland Füssen
January 4, 1992 Germany  6 – 2
 Switzerland Kaufbeuren
January 4, 1992 United States  3 – 2
 Czechoslovakia Füssen

Leading scorers[edit]

  GP G A Pts PIM
Sweden Michael Nylander 8 9 17
Sweden Peter Forsberg 3 8 11
Sweden Markus Näslund 8 2 10
Sweden Mikael Renberg 6 4 10
Commonwealth of Independent States Alexei Kovalev 5 5 10

Tournament all-stars[edit]

Pool B[edit]

Eight teams contested the second tier this year in Tychy and Oswiecim Poland from December 27 to January 5. It was played in a simple round robin format, each team playing seven games. This tournament offered a rather improbable result; four of the eight teams finished tied for first. In head-to-head results, Japan and Poland had 4 points each, Norway and France 2 each, so Japan's victory over Poland on the final day gave them the tournament victory.[3][4]

Standings
Rank Team GP W L T GF GA PTS Japan Poland Norway France Romania Netherlands Austria North Korea
1  Japan 7 5 2 0 32 18 10 7 - 4 2 - 4 4 - 2 3 - 2 5 - 2 2 - 3 9 - 1
2  Poland 7 5 2 0 42 19 10 4 - 7 5 - 3 5 - 1 3 - 6 9 - 0 7 - 2 9 - 0
3  Norway 7 5 2 0 45 17 10 4 - 2 3 - 5 1 - 4 8 - 0 14 - 2 6 - 2 9 - 2
4  France 7 5 2 0 31 15 10 2 - 4 1 - 5 4 - 1 6 - 1 5 - 1 4 - 1 9 - 2
5  Romania 7 4 3 0 23 26 8 2 - 3 6 - 3 0 - 8 1 - 6 3 - 0 3 - 2 8 - 4
6  Netherlands 7 2 5 0 14 38 4 2 - 5 0 - 9 2 - 14 1 - 5 0 - 3 4 - 1 5 - 1
7  Austria 7 2 5 0 16 29 4 3 - 2 2 - 7 2 - 6 1 - 4 2 - 3 1 - 4 5 - 3
8  North Korea 7 0 7 0 13 54 0 1 - 9 0 - 9 2 - 9 2 - 9 4 - 8 1 - 5 3 - 5

Japan was promoted to Pool A and North Korea was relegated to Pool C for 1993.

Pool C[edit]

Pool C was contested by nine teams from December 28, to January 4, in Marino and Rome Italy. In the first round the nine teams were divided into three groups of three. The second round pitted the three first place teams against each other, likewise for the second place teams. Greece was disqualified for using an ineligible player, so they did not participate in the final round.[5]

Preliminary Round[edit]

Group A
Team GP W L T GF GA PTS Italy South Korea Greece
 Italy 2 2 0 0 21 1 4 8 - 1 13 - 0
 South Korea 2 1 1 0 8 8 2 1 - 8 7 - 0
 Greece 2 0 2 0 0 20 0 0 - 13 0 - 7
Group B
Team GP W L T GF GA PTS Denmark Hungary Bulgaria
 Denmark 2 2 0 0 22 1 4 10 - 0 12 - 1
 Hungary 2 1 1 0 8 10 2 0 - 10 8 - 0
 Bulgaria 2 0 2 0 1 20 0 1 - 12 0 - 8
Group C
Team GP W L T GF GA PTS United Kingdom Spain Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
 Great Britain 2 1 1 0 16 9 2 4 - 5 12 - 4
 Spain 2 1 1 0 8 10 2 5 - 4 3 - 6
 Yugoslavia 2 1 1 0 10 15 2 4 - 12 6 - 3

Final Round[edit]

Promotion Group
Group A
Team GP W L T GF GA PTS Italy Denmark United Kingdom
 Italy 2 2 0 0 9 5 4 5 - 2 4 - 3
 Denmark 2 1 1 0 8 8 2 2 - 5 6 - 3
 Great Britain 2 0 2 0 6 10 0 3 - 4 3 - 6

Italy was promoted to Pool B for 1993.

Fourth Place Group
Group A
Team GP W L T GF GA PTS Spain Hungary South Korea
 Spain 2 2 0 0 11 8 4 5 - 4 6 - 4
 Hungary 2 1 1 0 8 8 2 4 - 5 4 - 3
 South Korea 2 0 2 0 7 10 0 4 - 6 3 - 4
Seventh Place

 Yugoslavia 1 - 1  Bulgaria

References[edit]

  1. ^ IIHF 100 year anniversary story 59
  2. ^ Podnieks, Andrew (1998). Red, White, and Gold: Canada at the World Junior Championships 1974–1999. ECW Press. p. 240. ISBN 1-55022-382-8. 
  3. ^ Results at passionhockey.com
  4. ^ Tie breaking format
  5. ^ Results at passionhockey.com