1993 Giro d'Italia

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1993 Giro d'Italia
Race details
Dates 23 May – 13 June
Stages 21
Distance 3,702 km (2,300 mi)
Winning time 98h 09' 44" (36.954 km/h or 22.962 mph)
Palmares
Winner  Miguel Indurain (ESP) (Banesto)
Second  Piotr Ugrumov (LAT) (Mecair-Ballan)
Third  Claudio Chiappucci (ITA) (Carrera Jeans-Tassoni)

Points  Adriano Baffi (ITA) (Mercatone Uno-Zucchini-Medeghini)
Mountains  Claudio Chiappucci (ITA) (Carrera Jeans-Tassoni)
Youth  Pavel Tonkov (RUS) (Lampre-Polti)
Intergiro  Ján Svorada (CZE) (Lampre-Polti)
Team Lampre-Polti
Team Points Ariostea
1992
1994

The 1993 Giro d'Italia, (English: Tour of Italy), was the 76th edition of the Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tours. The Giro started off in Porto Azzurro on 23 May with a split stage, with the first leg being a mass-start stage and the latter an individual time trial. The race ended on 13 June with a stage that stretched 166 km (103.1 mi) from Biella to Milan. Twenty teams entered the race, which was won by Miguel Indurain of the Banesto team. Second and third respectively were the Latvian Piotr Ugrumov and the Italian rider, Claudio Chiappucci.[1] Indurain's victory in the 1993 Giro was his first step in completing the Giro – Tour double – winning the Giro d'Italia and Tour de France in one calendar year – becoming the first rider to repeat this feat in consecutive years.[2][3]

Moreno Argentin was the first rider to wear the race leader's pink jersey after winning the opening stage.[2] Argentin held that lead for ten more days before losing it to Miguel Indurain after the conclusion stage 10.[2] Bruno Leali stole the lead away from Indurain after the race's eleventh leg and held it up until the end of the fourteenth day of racing.[2] Indurain gained the lead after mountainous stage 14 and then held it all the way to the Giro's finish in Milan.[2]

Indurain became the first Spanish rider to win the Giro d'Italia in consecutive years. Amongst the other classifications that the race awarded, Italian Adriano Baffi of Mercatone Uno-Zucchini-Medeghini won the points competition, Carrera Jeans-Tassoni's Claudio Chiappucci won the mountains classification, Lampre-Polti's Pavel Tonkov completed the Giro as the best rider aged 25 or younger in the general classification, finishing fifth overall, and Ján Svorada of Lampre-Polti won the intergiro competition. Lampre-Polti finished as the winners of the team classification, ranking each of the twenty teams contesting the race by lowest cumulative time.[1] Ariostea finished as winners of the Trofeo Super Team classification.[1]

Teams[edit]

Twenty teams were invited by the race organizers to participate in the 1993 edition of the Giro d'Italia,[1] seven of which were based outside of Italy.[2] Each team sent a squad of nine riders, which meant that the race started with a peloton of 180 cyclists. From the riders that began the race, 132 made it to the finish in Milan.[1][2]

The 20 teams that took part in the race were:[1]

Pre-race favorites[edit]

The starting peloton included the 1992 winner, Miguel Indurain, who had not had a successful start to his 1993 campaign according to El Mundo writer Javier de Dalmases.[4] Dalmases went on to name Gianni Bugno, Pavel Tonkov, 1988 winner Andrew Hampsten, and Claudio Chiappucci as contenders for the overall crown, while author Bill McGann dismissed Bugno saying that he was ability to "win at will" had passed.[2]

Famed sprinters Mario Cipollini and Djamolidine Abdoujaparov did not compete in the race, while Dutch sprinter Jean-Paul van Poppel was going to race in the Giro but was left off the roster before it started.[4] With the aforementioned riders' absence, Dalmases stated that Italian Adriano Baffi would likely win some of the flat stages.[4] In addition, Dalmases believed Maurizio Fondriest was in peak form coming into the race and that he would be the first rider to don the race leader's maglia rosa (English: pink jersey).[4]

Route and stages[edit]

A mountain in the distance.
The nineteenth stage, a 55 km (34 mi) individual time trial, began in Pinerolo finished in the mountainous village Sestriere.

The route for the 1993 Giro d'Italia was unveiled by race director Carmine Castellano on 14 November 1992.[5][6] It contained three time trial events, all of which were individual.[6] There were nine stages containing high mountains, of which five had summit finishes: stage 3, to Sella di Corno;[7] stage 13, to Passo delle Erbe;[8] stage 15, to Lumezzane;[9] stage 17, to Chianale;[10] and stage 20, to Oropa.[2][11] Another stage with a mountain-top finish was stage 19, which consisted of a climbing time trial to village of Sestriere.[2][12] The organizers chose to include one rest day. When compared to the previous year's race, the race was 141 km (88 mi) shorter, contained one more rest day, more mountains,[6] and lacked an opening time trial prologue. In addition, this race contained one fewer stage, but two more sets of half stages.

The race began with a split stage on the island of Elba, where Napoleon Bonaparte was exiled briefly in 1814.[4][6] The race last visited in 1980 where the race finished in Portoferraio with a sprint finish won by Carmelo Barone.[4][6] The route contained less time trials than the 1992 route, which Italian rider Claudio Chiappucci had requested.[5][6] The race's fourteenth stage, which began and ended in Corvara, was named the queen stage for the amount of difficult mountains contained in the stage.[6] Italian rider Franco Chioccioli liked that there were more points of attack in the race and believed that played into Miguel Indurain's hands.[13]

Stage results[14][15]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
1a 23 May Porto Azzurro to Portoferraio 85 km (53 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Moreno Argentin (ITA)
1b Portoferraio 9 km (6 mi) Individual time trial  Maurizio Fondriest (ITA)
2 24 May Grosseto to Rieti 224 km (139 mi) Plain stage  Adriano Baffi (ITA)
3 25 May Rieti to Scanno 153 km (95 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Piotr Ugrumov (LAT)
4 26 May Lago di Scanno to Marcianise 179 km (111 mi) Plain stage  Fabio Baldato (ITA)
5 27 May Paestum to Terme Luigiane 210 km (130 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Dimitri Konyshev (RUS)
6 28 May Villafranca Tirrena to Messina 130 km (81 mi) Plain stage  Guido Bontempi (ITA)
7 29 May Capo d'Orlando to Agrigento 240 km (149 mi) Plain stage  Bjarne Riis (DEN)
8 30 May Agrigento to Palermo 140 km (87 mi) Plain stage  Adriano Baffi (ITA)
31 May Rest day
9 1 June Montelibretti to Fabriano 216 km (134 mi) Plain stage  Giorgio Furlan (ITA)
10 2 June Senigallia to Senigallia 28 km (17 mi) Individual time trial  Miguel Indurain (ESP)
11 3 June Senigallia to Dozza 184 km (114 mi) Plain stage  Fabiano Fontanelli (ITA)
12 4 June Dozza to Asiago 239 km (149 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Dimitri Konyshev (RUS)
13 5 June Asiago to Corvara 220 km (137 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Moreno Argentin (ITA)
14 6 June Corvara to Corvara 245 km (152 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Claudio Chiappucci (ITA)
15 7 June Corvara to Lumezzane 263 km (163 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Davide Cassani (ITA)
16 8 June Lumezzane to Borgo Val di Taro 181 km (112 mi) Plain stage  Fabio Baldato (ITA)
17 9 June Varazze to Pontechianale 223 km (139 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Marco Saligari (ITA)
18 10 June Sampeyre to Fossano 150 km (93 mi) Plain stage  Adriano Baffi (ITA)
19 11 June Pinerolo to Sestriere 55 km (34 mi) Individual time trial  Miguel Indurain (ESP)
20 12 June Turin to Santuario di Oropa 162 km (101 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Massimo Ghirotto (ITA)
21 13 June Biella to Milan 166 km (103 mi) Plain stage  Fabio Baldato (ITA)
Total 3,702 km (2,300 mi)

Race overview[edit]

A man wearing a navy pinstriped button-up with his arms behind his back.
Adriano Baffi won three stages at the 1993 Giro d'Italia.

This edition of the Giro began with a split stage, with the morning leg consisting of a 85 km (53 mi) undulating course and the afternoon stage being a brief 9 km (6 mi) individual time trial.[2][16] Moreno Argentin won the morning stage after attacking on the final climb of the day to win the leg by thirty-four seconds over the chasing peloton.[2][16] The afternoon time trial navigated the streets of Portoferraio and was won by Italian Maurizio Fondriest.[2][16] The Giro's second stage was relatively a flat route that culminated with a sprint finish which was won by Adriano Baffi.[2][17] The next day saw the first uphill finish to the Selle di Corno.[2][18] General classification hopeful Piotr Ugrumov positioned himself in the day's breakaway and attacked up the final climb to win the stage and climb to second overall.[2][18]

The Giro's fourth stage ended with a sprint finish that was won by Italian Fabio Baldato.[2][19] Jolly Componibili-Club 88's Dimitri Konyshev attacked in the closing kilometers of the fifth stage to take the win.[2][20] The day of racing concluded with a sprint finish in Messina, which was won by Italian Guido Bontempi.[2][21] Bjarne Riis, Giancarlo Perini, and Michele Coppolillo made up the leading breakaway as the race made its way into the stage seven finish in Agrigento.[22] Riis and Coppolillo pulled away from Perini in the final seconds and Riis subsequently edged out Perini for the victory.[22] The race's eighth leg came down to a sprint finish in Palermo, where Adriano Baffi bested the likes of Endrio Leoni and Fabio Baldato for the win.[23]

The race's ninth stage began in Montelibretti after the race necessitated the transfer to the city during the rest day the day before. The riders were preparing for a sprint finish when Giorgio Furlan and Mario Chiesa attacked with about 5 km (3 mi) of racing to go.[24] The two riders successfully fended off the chasing peloton and went on to the finish in Fabriano, where Furlan managed to beat out Chiesa for the victory.[24] The stage 10 individual time trial began and ended in the city of Senigallia.[25] Miguel Indurain dominated the course and gained over a minute on race leader Moreno Argentin, which allowed him to gain the overall lead of the race and don the race leader's maglia rosa (English: pink jersey).[2][25]

Stage eleven was marred by rainy weather, which caused many splits in the peloton.[2][26] Fabio Fontanelli won the stage as a member of the lead group, but tenth place finisher Bruno Leali gained a six-second race lead by finishing more than three minutes in front of overall leader Miguel Indurain.[2][26] The Giro's twelfth stage began with a large climb which led to many attacks.[2][27] Despite the flurry of attacks, the whole peloton eventually made it to the finish line together for a sprint finish that was won by Russian Dimitri Konyshev.[2][27]

The thirteenth stage saw the first stage that contained mountains from the Dolomites.[2] On the penultimate climb of the day, the Passo di Eores, a lead group broke away that contained the likes of Andrew Hampsten, Piotr Urgrumov, and Massimiliano Lelli.[2][28] The riders stayed out in front over the final climb of the Passi delle Erbe, but were eventually caught by the chase group containing the race leader Leoni.[2][28] Moreno Argentin edged out Lelli for his second stage victory at the 1993 Giro d'Italia.[2][28] The next day's route was even more demanding as it contained two ascents of the Passo Pordoi, as well as the climbing of three other highly categorized climbs.[2][29] Miguel Indurain, Ugrumov, Claudio Chiappucci, and a few other general classification hopefuls were in the leading breakaway as they crossed the Pordoi for the second time.[2][30] The group rode into the finish in Corvara with race leader Leoni trailing by several minutes.[2][30] Chiappucci won the sprint to the line, while Indurain regained the overall lead.[2][30]

A man looking at the camera while wearing a suit.
Miguel Indurain won his second consecutive Giro d'Italia in 1993.

Davide Cassani won the fifteenth stage that featured a summit finish to Lumezzane, while the general classification remained largely unaltered.[31] The next day of racing saw a break from the mountains, with a primarily flat course that stretched from Varazze to Pontechianale.[32] The stage ultimately finished with a bunch sprint that was won by Italian Fabio Baldato.[32] The Giro's seventeenth stage concluded with a summit finish to Chianale.[33] Marco Saligari won the stage by over a minute on the second place finisher Gianluca Bortolami, while the general classification contenders finished together leaving the classification largely unchanged.[33] Stage eighteen was a primarily flat stage that closed with a field sprint.[34] Adriano Baffi won the field sprint and the stage, which was his third stage victory at the Giro that year.[34]

The final time trial in the 1993 Giro d'Italia was 55 km (34 mi) in length and had a summit finish on the famous climb of the Sestriere.[2][35] Miguel Indurain won the leg and extended his lead over the rest of the field.[2][35] The penultimate stage featured a 10 km (6 mi) climb to Oropa.[2][36] Second overall Piotr Ugrumov attacked multiple times on the final climb of the day to gain time on Indurain; he attacked one last time and Indurain could not match his move.[2][36] Massimo Ghirotto was the first rider to cross the finish line, with Ugrumov finishing in fifth and Indurain in tenth.[2][36] Ugrumov gained 40 seconds on Indurain's lead, but it was not good enough to take it away from the Spaniard.[2][36] The final stage was a primarily flat course that stretched from Biella to Milan.[1] The leg culminated with a bunch sprint that was won by Italian Fabio Baldato.[1] Indurain had won his second consecutive Giro d'Italia.[2]

Success in stages was limited to nine of the competing teams, seven of which achieved multiple stage victories, while five individual riders won multiple stages. The riders that won more than once were Moreno Argentin in stages 1a[16] and 13,[28] Adriano Baffi in stages 2,[17] 8,[23] and 18,[34] Fabio Baldato in stages 4,[19] 16,[32] and 21,[1] Dimitri Konyshev in stages 5[20] and 12,[27] and Miguel Indurain in stages 10 and 19.[25][35] Mecair-Ballan won two stages with Moreno Argentin and stage 3 with Piotr Ugrumov.[18] Ariostea won four stages, with Bjarne Riis in stage 7,[22] Giorgio Furlan in stage 9,[24] Davide Cassani in stage 15,[31] and Marco Saligari stage 17.[33] Banesto won two stages with Miguel Indurain. GB-MG Maglificio won three stages with Fabio Baldato. Jolly Componibili-Club 88 won two stages with Dimitri Konyshev. Carrera Jeans-Tassoni won two stages, stage 6 with Guido Bontempi and stage 14 with Claudio Chiappucci.[21][30] Navigare-Blue Storm also won multiple stages, with Fabiano Fontanelli in stage 11 and three stages with Adriano Baffi.[26]

Lampre-Polti and ZG Mobili each won one stage apiece. Maurizio Fondriest of Lampre-Polti won the stage 1b individual time trial,[16] while ZG Mobili rider Massimo Ghirotto won the mountainous stage 20.[36]

Classification leadership[edit]

Five different jerseys were worn during the 1993 Giro d'Italia. The leader of the general classification – calculated by adding the stage finish times of each rider, and allowing time bonuses for the first three finishers on mass-start stages – wore a pink jersey. This classification is the most important of the race, and its winner is considered as the winner of the Giro.[37]

A picture of a mountain.
The Pordoi Pass was the Cima Coppi for the 1993 running of the Giro d'Italia.

For the points classification, which awarded a purple (or cyclamen) jersey to its leader, cyclists were given points for finishing a stage in the top 15; additional points could also be won in intermediate sprints. The green jersey was awarded to the mountains classification leader. In this ranking, points were won by reaching the summit of a climb ahead of other cyclists. Each climb was ranked as either first, second or third category, with more points available for higher category climbs. The Cima Coppi, the race's highest point of elevation, awarded more points than the other first category climbs.[37] The Cima Coppi for this Giro was the Passo Pordoi. The first rider to cross the Pordoi Pass was Spaniard Miguel Indurain. The white jersey was worn by the leader of young rider classification, a ranking decided the same way as the general classification, but only riders born after 1 January 1969 were eligible for it.[37] The intergiro classification was marked by a blue jersey.[37] The calculation for the intergiro is similar to that of the general classification, in each stage there is a midway point that the riders pass through a point and where their time is stopped. As the race goes on, their times compiled and the person with the lowest time is the leader of the intergiro classification and wears the blue jersey.[37] Although no jersey was awarded, there was also one classification for the teams, in which the stage finish times of the best three cyclists per team were added; the leading team was the one with the lowest total time.[37]

The rows in the following table correspond to the jerseys awarded after that stage was run.

Classification leadership by stage
Stage Winner General classification
Points classification
Mountains classification
Young rider classification
Intergiro classification
Trofeo Fast Team
1a Moreno Argentin Moreno Argentin Moreno Argentin not awarded Francesco Casagrande not awarded Mecair-Ballan
1b Maurizio Fondriest Eddy Seigneur
2 Adriano Baffi Marco Saligari Francesco Casagrande Francesco Casagrande
3 Piotr Ugrumov Stefano Colagè
4 Fabio Baldato
5 Dimitri Konyshev Ján Svorada Carrera Jeans-Tassoni
6 Guido Bontempi Adriano Baffi
7 Bjarne Riis Ariostea
8 Adriano Baffi Mariano Piccoli Stefano Colagè
9 Giorgio Furlan
10 Miguel Indurain Miguel Indurain Mecair-Ballan
11 Fabiano Fontanelli Bruno Leali Lampre-Polti
12 Dimitri Konyshev Pavel Tonkov
13 Moreno Argentin Ján Svorada
14 Claudio Chiappucci Miguel Indurain Claudio Chiappucci Stefano Colagè Carrera Jeans-Tassoni
15 Davide Cassani Mariano Piccoli
16 Fabio Baldato Maurizio Fondriest
17 Marco Saligari Ján Svorada
18 Adriano Baffi Adriano Baffi Claudio Chiappucci Lampre-Polti
19 Miguel Indurain
20 Massimo Ghirotto
21 Fabio Baldato
Final Miguel Indurain Adriano Baffi Claudio Chiappucci Pavel Tonkov Ján Svorada Lampre-Polti

Final Standings[edit]

Legend
  A pink jersey   Denotes the winner of the General classification[1]   A green jersey   Denotes the winner of the Mountains classification[1]
  A purple jersey   Denotes the winner of the Points classification[1]   A white jersey   Denotes the winner of the Young rider classification[1]
  A blue jersey   Denotes the winner of the Intergiro classification[1]

General classification[edit]

Rider Team Time
1  Miguel Indurain (ESP) Pink jersey Banesto 98h 09' 44"
2  Piotr Ugrumov (LAT) Mecair-Ballan + 58"
3  Claudio Chiappucci (ITA) A green jersey Carrera Jeans-Tassoni + 5' 27"
4  Massimiliano Lelli (ITA) Ariostea + 6' 09"
5  Pavel Tonkov (RUS) A white jersey Lampre-Polti + 7' 11"
6  Moreno Argentin (ITA) Mecair-Ballan + 9' 12"
7  Vladimir Pulnikov (RUS) Carrera Jeans-Tassoni + 11' 30"
8  Maurizio Fondriest (ITA) Lampre-Polti + 12' 53"
9  Stephen Roche (IRL) Carrera Jeans-Tassoni + 13' 31"
10  Zenon Jaskuła (POL) GB-MG Maglificio + 13' 41"

Points classification[edit]

Rider Team Points
1  Adriano Baffi (ITA) purple jersey Mercatone Uno-Zucchini-Medeghini 228
2  Maurizio Fondriest (ITA) Lampre-Polti 187
3  Miguel Indurain (ESP) Pink jersey Banesto 167
4  Fabio Baldato (ITA) GB-MG Maglificio 164
5  Moreno Argentin (ITA) Mecair-Ballan 141
6  Piotr Ugrumov (LAT) Mecair-Ballan 130
7  Marco Saligari (ITA) Ariostea 118
8  Ján Svorada (CZE) A blue jersey Lampre-Polti 117
 Dimitri Konychev (RUS) Jolly Componibili-Club 88
10  Endrio Leoni (ITA) Jolly Componibili-Club 88 113

Young rider classification[edit]

Rider Team Time
1  Pavel Tonkov (RUS) A white jersey Lampre-Polti 98h 16' 55"
2  Wladimir Belli (ITA) Lampre-Polti + 11' 35"
3  Francesco Casagrande (ITA) Mercatone Uno-Zucchini-Medeghini + 1h 07' 38"
4  Kai Hundertmarck (GER) Motorola + 1h 15' 15"
5  Vladislav Bobrik (RUS) Mecair-Ballan + 1h 43' 22"
6  Laurent Desbiens (FRA) Castorama + 1h 58' 04"
7  Carmelo Miranda (ESP) Artiach + 2h 02' 38"
8  Mariano Piccoli (ITA) Mercatone Uno-Zucchini-Medeghini + 2h 04' 55"
9  Bruno Thibout (FRA) Castorama + 2h 05' 30"
10  Evgeni Berzin (RUS) Mecair-Ballan + 2h 10' 08"

Intergiro classification[edit]

Rider Team Time
1  Ján Svorada (CZE) A blue jersey Lampre-Polti 53h 10' 33"
2  Stefano Colagè (ITA) ZG Mobili + 40"
3  Miguel Indurain (ESP) Pink jersey Banesto + 41"

Trofeo Fast Team classification[edit]

Team Time
1 Lampre-Polti 294h 50' 53"
2 Carrera Jeans-Tassoni + 2' 24"
3 Ariostea + 6' 47"
4 Mecair-Ballan + 9' 59"
5 Mercatone Uno-Zucchini-Medeghini + 22' 56"
6 GB-MG Maglificio + 48' 17"
7 Castorama + 1h 07' 33"
8 Banesto + 1h 23' 22"
9 Mapei-Viner + 1h 33' 04"
10 ZG Mobili + 1h 36' 37"

Team points classification[edit]

Team Points
1 Ariostea 531
2 Mercatone Uno-Zucchini-Medeghini 460
3 Lampre-Polti 444
4 Carrera Jeans-Tassoni 417
5 Mecair-Ballan 383
6 GB-MG Maglificio 351
7 Gatorade-Mega Drive 263
8 Castorama 262
9 Jolly Componibili-Club 88 250
10 Mapei-Viner 232

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "'93 giro de Italia" ['93 Giro d'Italia] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 14 June 1993. p. 38. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am Bill and Carol McGann. "1993 Giro d'Italia". Bike Race Info. Dog Ear Publishing. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 16 April 2013. 
  3. ^ Andrew Hood (13 May 2013). "The Giro-Tour double: Cycling’s elusive feat". VeloNews (Competitor Group, Inc). Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 23 June 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f Javier de Dalmases (23 May 1993). "La isla de Elba designará al primer 'Napoleón' rosa" [The island of Elba appoint the first 'Napoleon' pink] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). p. 38. Archived from the original on 2013-07-02. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  5. ^ a b "Klimtijdrit in de Giro" [Climb Time Trial in the Giro] (PDF). Leidsch Dagblad (in Dutch) (Milan, Italy: Leidsch Dagblad). 16 November 1992. p. 24. Archived from the original on 2013-07-02. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g "Un Giro duro y equilibrado" [A Hard and Balanced Tour] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 15 November 1992. p. 36. Archived from the original on 19 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  7. ^ "Hoy: Rieti – Scanno 157km" [Today: Rieti – Scanno 157km] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 25 May 1993. p. 39. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  8. ^ "Hoy: Asiago – Corvara Alta Badia 217km" [Today: Asiago – Corvara Alta Badia 217km] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 5 June 1993. p. 34. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  9. ^ "Hoy: Corvara Alta Badia – Lumezzane 258km" [Today: Corvara Alta Badia – Lumezzane 258km] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 7 June 1993. p. 46. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  10. ^ "Hoy: Varazze – Valle Varaita (Chianale) 223km" [Today: Varazze – Valle Varaita (Chianale) 223km] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 9 June 1993. p. 39. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  11. ^ "Hoy: Torino – Oropa 172km" [Today: Torino – Oropa 172km] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 12 June 1993. p. 8. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  12. ^ "Hoy: Pinerolo – Sestrieres 55km" [Today: Pinerolo – Sestrieres 55km] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 11 June 1993. p. 9. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  13. ^ "Un Giro duro y equilibrado" [A Hard and Balanced Tour] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 15 November 1992. p. 37. Archived from the original on 19 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  14. ^ "Miguel el Conquistador" [Miguel the Conquistador] (PDF). l’Unità (in Italian) (PCI). 23 May 1993. p. 28. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  15. ^ "Milán se convierte en Villava por unas horas" [Milan becomes Villava for a few hours] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 14 June 1993. p. 34. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  16. ^ a b c d e "Indurain cumple con lo previsto" [Indurain complies with the provisions] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 24 May 1993. p. 39. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  17. ^ a b "Indurain muestra sus garras" [Indurain shows his claws] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 25 May 1993. p. 36. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  18. ^ a b c "Indurain siempre controla" [Indurain always controls] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 26 May 1993. p. 34. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  19. ^ a b "Indurain huye de las caídas" [Indurain Flees the Falls] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 27 May 1993. p. 40. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  20. ^ a b "Konyshev, como en una clásica" [Konyshev, as in a Classic] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 28 May 1993. p. 38. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  21. ^ a b "Indurain se queda sin Philipot" [Indurain runs out Philipot] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 29 May 1993. p. 38. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  22. ^ a b c "Indurain se refugia del calor" [Indurain takes refuge from the heat] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 20 May 1993. p. 34. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  23. ^ a b "Baffi cierra la semana del calor con otra victoria" [Baffi heat closes the week with another victory] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 31 May 1993. p. 42. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  24. ^ a b c "Furlan le roba la gloria a Cabello" [Furlan steals glory at Cabello] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 2 June 1993. p. 38. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  25. ^ a b c "Miguel Indurain vuela en Senigallia y se viste de rosa" [Miguel Indurain in Senigallia flies and wears pink] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 3 June 1993. p. 38. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  26. ^ a b c "Miguel presta la 'maglia' a Leali" [Miguel lends the 'jersey' to Leali] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 4 June 1993. p. 31. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  27. ^ a b c "Miguel Indurain, salvado por la labor de caza de los Mercatone" [Miguel Indurain, saved by the work of hunting Mercatone] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 5 June 1993. p. 31. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  28. ^ a b c d "Reválida para el número uno" [Revalidation for number one] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 6 June 1993. p. 42. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  29. ^ "Hoy: Corvara Alta Badia – Corvara Alta Badia 250km" [Today: Corvara Alta Badia – Corvara Alta Badia 250km] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 6 June 1993. p. 45. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  30. ^ a b c d "Indurain recupera el rosa con una leccion de poder" [Indurain regains pink with a lesson in power] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 7 June 1993. p. 43. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  31. ^ a b "El Banesto, a por Gianni Bugno" [The Banesto, by Gianni Bugno] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 8 June 1993. p. 33. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  32. ^ a b c "Claudio ataca, Miguel responde" [Claudio attacks, Miguel responds] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 7 June 1993. p. 43. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  33. ^ a b c "Claudio, el 'Diablo' sin tridente" [Claudio, the 'Devil' no trident] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 10 June 1993. p. 35. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  34. ^ a b c "Indurain controla antes del gran día" [Indurain controls before the big day] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 11 June 1993. p. 6. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  35. ^ a b c "Indurain remata la faena a lo grande" [Indurain finishes off the job in style] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 11 June 1993. p. 6. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  36. ^ a b c d e "Indurain tambien es humano" [Indurain is human] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish) (El Mundo Deportivo S.A.). 11 June 1993. p. 6. Archived from the original on 18 June 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  37. ^ a b c d e f Laura Weislo (13 May 2008). "Giro d'Italia classifications demystified". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 13 July 2013.