1993 Michigan Wolverines football team

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1993 Michigan Wolverines football
Michigan Wolverines Logo.svg
Hall of Fame Bowl Champions
Conference Big Ten Conference
Ranking
Coaches #19
AP #21
1993 record 8–4 (5–3 Big Ten)
Head coach Gary Moeller (4th year)
Defensive coordinator Lloyd Carr (7th year)
MVP Buster Stanley
Captain Buster Stanley
Captain Ricky Powers
Home stadium Michigan Stadium
Seasons
« 1992 1994 »
1993 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#6/5 Wisconsin § 6 1 1     10 1 1
#11/10 Ohio State § 6 1 1     10 1 1
#8/7 Penn State 6 2 0     10 2 0
Indiana 5 3 0     8 4 0
#21/19 Michigan 5 3 0     8 4 0
Illinois 5 3 0     5 6 0
Michigan State 4 4 0     6 6 0
Iowa 3 5 0     6 6 0
Minnesota 3 5 0     4 7 0
Northwestern 0 8 0     2 9 0
Purdue 0 8 0     1 10 0
§ – Conference co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll / Coaches' Poll

The 1993 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1993 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team's head coach was Gary Moeller. The Wolverines played their home games at Michigan Stadium. That year Michigan Wolverines football competed in the Big Ten Conference in almost all intercollegiate sports including men's college football. The team featured three All-Americans: Tyrone Wheatley, Buster Stanley, and Ty Law. Stanley, who was the team MVP, served as co-captain with Ricky Powers. The team posted an 8–4 overall record (5–3 Big Ten) and won the 1994 Hall of Fame Bowl.

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 4, 1993 3:30 PM Washington State* #3/3 Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI ABC W 41–14   105,512
September 11, 1993 12:00 PM #11/10 Notre Dame* #3/2 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI (Rivalry) ABC L 23–27   106,851
September 25, 1993 12:30 PM Houston* #8/9 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 42–21   104,196
October 2, 1993 12:30 PM Iowa #8/10 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI ESPN W 24–7   105,423
October 9, 1993 3:30 PM at Michigan State #9/10 Spartan StadiumEast Lansing, MI (Paul Bunyan Trophy) ABC L 7–17   78,311
October 16, 1993 12:00 PM at #7/7 Penn State #18/17 Beaver StadiumUniversity Park, PA ABC W 21–13   96,719
October 23, 1993 3:30 PM Illinoisdagger #13/14 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI ABC L 21–24   106,385
October 30, 1993 12:30 PM at #21/20 Wisconsin #24/23 Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI ESPN L 10–13   77,745
November 6, 1993 1:00 PM Purdue Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 25–10   104,326
November 13, 1993 12:30 PM at Minnesota Hubert H. Humphrey MetrodomeMinneapolis, MN (Little Brown Jug) ESPN W 58–7   43,603
November 20, 1993 12:00 PM #5/5 Ohio State Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI (The Game) ABC W 28–0   106,867
January 1, 1994 11:00 AM vs. NC State* #23/22 Tampa StadiumTampa, FL (Hall of Fame Bowl) ESPN W 42–7   64,597
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll / Coaches' Poll released prior to game. All times are in Eastern Time.

Statistical achievements[edit]

Wheatley was the repeat Big Ten scoring champion with an 8.4 points per game average in all games, although he lost the conference games title to Purdue's Mike Alstott.[1]

The team led the Big Ten in passing efficiency for conference games (155.2), although Wisconsin won the title for all games.[2] The team earned the fourth of four consecutive and six 1990s Big Ten rushing defense statistical championships for all games by holding opponents to 108.0 yards per game.[3] The team also earned the third of five consecutive and six 1990s Big Ten rushing defense statistical championships for conference games by holding opponents to 103.0 yards per game.[3] The team led the Big Ten Conference in scoring defense for conference games (11.4 points per game) and all games (13.3).[4]

Todd Collins established the school record for single-season pass attempts (296), eclipsing Jim Harbaugh's 1986 total of 277 and broken by Brian Griese in 1997.[5]

Awards and honors[edit]

Coaching staff[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2010. pp. 53–4. Retrieved July 8, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2010. p. 55. Retrieved July 8, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2010. p. 56. Retrieved July 8, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2010. p. 58. Retrieved July 8, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Record Book". CBS Interactive. January 5, 2009. pp. 120–123. Retrieved July 10, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Michigan's Academic All-Americans". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on July 18, 2010. Retrieved July 10, 2010. 

External links[edit]